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    Default "Hopefully when I知 gone, there値l be something that'll stay with people & move them"

    "Hopefully when I知 gone, there値l be something that will stay with people, and move them" - Eddie Van Halen

    By Paul Brannigan

    From Louder:

    The acclaimed biography 'Unchained: The Eddie Van Halen Story' by Classic Rock writer Paul Brannigan came out in the UK earlier this year.

    Now, with a US edition available to order, we're publishing the book's introduction to gave fans a taste of what lies within its pages.

    Lost in music, Eddie Van Halen didn稚 initially hear his wife screaming at him as he repeatedly pounded out the keyboard riff which had been living rent-free in his head for the best part of two years.

    Only later, listening back to his first demo recording of that percussive chord vamp, instantly recognisable now as the introduction to his band痴 signature anthem Jump, could Eddie pick out the exasperated yells of 鉄hut up! coming from the couple痴 bedroom as he jabbed staccato triads on the synth on his living-room floor.

    In the earliest months of his residency in America, constantly hearing those same two words from bullying teachers, from racist classmates, from the stressed, exhausted, homesick parents in the two families who shared the three-bedroom property in the Pasadena suburbs in which his own family was housed upon emigrating to California caused the previously confident, happy-go-lucky, inquisitive Dutch youngster to withdraw deep into his own imagination.

    It wasn稚 until he discovered rock地池oll, and the liberating potential of an over-amplified electric guitar, that the young Eddie Van Halen found his voice and began to reimagine the world around him.

    That process began soon after he reached the age of majority, when, dissatisfied with the mass-produced 祖lassic guitars that had helped democratise rock 地 roll for the generation which preceded him, he invented his own hybrid instrument, a bespoke 詮rankenstrat.

    He then set about creating a whole new vocabulary for this misshapen mongrel as, alongside his elder brother Alex, he negotiated a life in music with the band that bore his surname.

    Still he was told to shut up: by club owners who wanted their patrons sedated with familiar pop standards; by buzz-kill cops who壇 gatecrash the chaotic, over-subscribed backyard parties Van Halen played every weekend, barking dispersal orders at hundreds of high-school students flipping the bird skywards at the hovering Pasadena Police Department helicopter; even, with increasing regularity, by the needy, limelight-addicted, man-child singer by his side. But the guitarist would be silent no more.

    The release of Van Halen痴 dazzling self-titled debut album in February 1978 shifted the course of rock 地 roll history. As with debut sets from the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Ramones, Public Enemy and N.W.A., it created a fresh, original, revitalising blueprint for music with attitude.

    Let痴 be clear: while it emerged at a time when disco and new wave had captured the popular imagination, Van Halen didn稚 壮ave hard rock and heavy metal no rock fan in 1978 listening to Powerage or Live and Dangerous or Stained Class or Hemispheres or Tokyo Tapes considered the genre on its knees, and the nascent New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement which would propel Iron Maiden and Def Leppard into US arenas within five years owed precisely nothing to the Pasadena party rockers but Eddie痴 innovative, incandescent guitar-playing undoubtedly lit a new fire under the genre.

    And with Eruption, his jaw-dropping 102-second solo showcase, blending laser-guided hammer-ons and pull-offs, blur-speed neo-classical triplets, two-handed legato tapping and gravity-drop whammy-bar plunges, the twenty three-year-old guitarist established a new Year Zero for his fellow players. On hearing it, guitarists inevitably had two questions: "How the fuck is he doing that?" and "How can I copy it?"

    The most iconic instrumental showcase since Jimi Hendrix痴 Woodstock savaging of The Star-Spangled Banner, Eruption served to bisect hard rock痴 timeline into 善re-EVH and 善ost-EVH, creating both a generation of inferior copycat technicians and, arguably of greater significance, a subculture of 疎lternative rock guitarists who, awed and daunted by Eddie痴 virtuosity, sought to focus instead on fashioning less technical, more individualistic approaches to playing the instrument.

    Eddie, of course, had his own influences early Eric Clapton, Alvin Lee, Jimmy Page, Pete Townshend, Jeff Beck and Allan Holdsworth to name but a few but in terms of a mindset and modus operandi underpinning his approach to the guitar, it may be instructive to remove any identification with England痴 rock aristocracy and, instead, re-centre Eddie spiritually with California痴 Z-Boys skateboard crew of the mid-1970s Tony Alva, Jay Adams, Stacy Peralta, Peggy Oki fearless, questing, daredevil athletes who constantly pushed boundaries, both physical and psychological.

    Like Tony Alva with a wooden deck and polyurethane wheels beneath his feet, Eddie felt at his most weightless with wood and wires in his hands uncontainable, unstoppable, unchained. As with the Z-Boys launching themselves into empty suburban Californian swimming pools, Eddie痴 approach to guitar solos was to leap into the unknown, with no preconceived idea of where, or indeed how, he might land and no fear of the descent.

    Like a skater, too, he viewed the bumps and dips of the landscape stretching before him as a space for free expression, and where others saw obstacles, he saw opportunities. "Edward has a sense of adventure," David Lee Roth once noted approvingly. "He will dive headfirst. We値l see if there痴 water in the pool later."

    I met Eddie Van Halen only once, at his 5150 studio facility in the grounds of his Los Angeles home, in spring 1998. With its twin-seater SEGA Daytona USA racing game, Twister pinball machine, Asteroids arcade game, widescreen TV and racks of video cassettes and CDs, the studio痴 reception room resembled a teenage boy痴 idea of an adult male痴 home, but the juxtaposition, in the kitchen, of a photograph of Eddie and Alex痴 childhood home in Nijmegen, Holland, with a huge, gleaming Recording Industry Association of America presentation plaque acknowledging their group痴 60 million US record sales was a striking reminder of just how far Jan and Eugenia Van Halen痴 boys had come.

    The man of the house could not have been more gracious or hospitable, proffering non-alcoholic beers before taking a seat on a black couch alongside his band痴 new vocalist, former Extreme frontman Gary Cherone, ready to talk up Van Halen痴 third act, which was being heralded by the St Patrick痴 Day release of the quartet痴 eleventh studio album, Van Halen III. He spoke about his love for his six-year-old son Wolfie, telling how the pair would take trips together to the beach to collect stones to fashion into plectrums, and shared his regret at the demands of his job taking him away from his actress wife, Valerie Bertinelli.

    Speaking of his pressing need for a hip replacement operation, he noted, "I知 just a fucking old jerk like anyone else." But when he picked up one of his signature series guitars and began tapping out the riff to Drop Dead Legs on the fretboard, his well-lined face seemed to shed the wear and tear of the past fifteen years in an instant.

    Over the course of the next hour, as he shared war stories from his twenty-five years in the rock地池oll business, that guitar never left his hands. It sang, it roared, it squealed, it grumbled, it spat, and often it seemed to laugh aloud, with Eddie smiling and laughing too, seemingly scarcely able to believe the sounds he was making.

    Notoriously wary of journalists "No one really understands what I知 trying to say," he once complained to Guitar Player magazine痴 Jas Obrecht, the writer who conducted Eddie痴 very first media interview in 1978 and became a trusted confidante he placed his own Dictaphone on the table alongside mine as our interview began.

    It was only years later, as I read more about his working methods, that I realised that his tape recorder wasn稚 rolling to ensure that his words would not be misquoted in a publication he would surely never read, but rather to capture the riffs and musical motifs which streamed unselfconsciously from his fingers as he spoke, lest there might be gold buried in the deep.

    In conversation with US writer, and avowed fan, Chuck Klosterman for Billboard magazine in 2015, Eddie confessed that he couldn稚 recall writing the iconic riffs to any of his band痴 biggest songs, having written the vast majority of them while drunk and wired on high-grade cocaine. When he shared with me his belief that, in the past, his excessive drinking was born from a desire to mask the fact that he considered himself 奏he most insecure fuck you値l ever meet in your life, it was hard not to wonder whether his tried and trusted methodology of drinking in order to create hadn稚 contributed, over the years, to a debilitating sense of imposter syndrome.

    Van Halen III, he proudly declared, was the first album he壇 written while completely sober. Somewhat cruelly, it was also, inarguably, the worst album ever released under the Van Halen name, and although Eddie spoke that afternoon of 僧aking music until I die, in his remaining twenty-two years on the planet he would never again release a full album of new songs, with Van Halen痴 final album, 2012痴 A Different Kind of Truth, being largely composed of reworkings of previously unreleased demo tracks originally recorded between 1974 and 1977.

    In quiet moments, the indignity must surely have stung the maestro. 典here痴 an old Russian saying: 典here痴 no more lines in that guy痴 stomach," David Lee Roth told the LA Times in 2012, as A Different Kind of Truth was released. 的t means somebody got fat and slow. There are still a lot of lines in Eddie痴 stomach.

    Eddie Van Halen痴 death, aged sixty-five, on 6 October 2020, elicited a huge outpouring of grief and love from his fellow musicians, many of whom saluted him as 奏he Mozart of the guitar.

    "He was the real deal," said Led Zeppelin痴 Jimmy Page, "he pioneered a dazzling technique on guitar with taste and panache that I felt always placed him above his imitators."

    "Eddie was a guitar wonder, his playing pure wizardry," said AC/DC痴 Angus Young. "To the world of music, he was a special gift." Queen痴 Brian May hailed his friend as "probably the most original and dazzling rock guitarist in history", while The Who痴 Pete Townshend, another friend, simply called him "the Great American Guitar Player".

    Putting the finishing touches to this book in the spring of 2021, six months after Eddie痴 death, I dug out the copy of Kerrang! magazine in which my 1998 interview with the guitarist was published. The closing lines of the piece, perhaps inevitably, seemed to carry more gravitas and weight in the wake of his passing. "Music is not a competition," he told me, "and hopefully when I知 gone, there値l be something that will stay with people, and move them. Whether that値l be ten people, or ten million people, that値l be my mission here accomplished."

    In the article痴 concluding paragraphs, I had referenced the fact that Eddie freely admitted that he had never attempted to keep up with trends in modern music. He had revealed that most recently he壇 been listening to Bob Dylan痴 thirtieth studio album, 1997痴 Time Out of Mind, but that his CD of the album kept sticking on track three.

    Now, out of curiosity, I identified the song, Standing in the Doorway, and decided to listen to it as a way of paying my own respects to Eddie. A song about growing old and reflecting on days gone by, it痴 written from the perspective of an ageing narrator who smokes, strums a 組ay guitar and recognises that, soon enough, he値l be meeting once more with the ghosts of his past.

    That seems like a fitting elegy for Eddie Van Halen, an artist who値l forever be enshrined in the collective consciousness standing on a stage, smiling broadly, listening in wonderment to the sounds being conjured from his home-made guitar, hard rock痴 own Peter Pan, a free-spirited soul who never grew up but who learned how to fly.

    Published by Permuted Press, Unchained: The Eddie Van Halen Story is available to order now from Van Halen Store.

    The UK version of the book, titled Eruption, published by Faber and Faber, is on-sale now.

    Louder is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site.
    Beauty is life when life unveils
    her holy face.

    But you are life and you
    are the veil.

    Beauty is eternity gazing at itself
    in a mirror.

    But you are eternity
    and you are the mirror.

    -Kahil Gibran

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    Sorry James. Too impatient to read all that. Got the gist though.

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    Jim from Taxi: What does a yellow light mean?

    Slow down.

    Jim: Whhhhhat does a yelllllllow light mmmmean?

    Slow down, Chris!

    Patience.
    Beauty is life when life unveils
    her holy face.

    But you are life and you
    are the veil.

    Beauty is eternity gazing at itself
    in a mirror.

    But you are eternity
    and you are the mirror.

    -Kahil Gibran

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    Quote Originally Posted by James in New York View Post
    Jim from Taxi: What does a yellow light mean?

    Slow down.

    Jim: Whhhhhat does a yelllllllow light mmmmean?

    Slow down, Chris!

    Patience.
    Lord grant me patience and give it to me right now!
    "It's so lonely at the top because it's so crowded at the bottom" - Diamond David Lee Roth

    "The truth sounds like hate to those who hate the truth" - Todd Wagner

    "Women and Children First ... The REAL Van Halen III"

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    One of my very best friends is a Bob Dylan fanatic. I have to tell him about EVH's fascination with the song "Standing In The Doorway" ...

    "It's so lonely at the top because it's so crowded at the bottom" - Diamond David Lee Roth

    "The truth sounds like hate to those who hate the truth" - Todd Wagner

    "Women and Children First ... The REAL Van Halen III"

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    Quote Originally Posted by James in New York View Post
    "Hopefully when I’m gone, there’ll be something that will stay with people, and move them" - Eddie Van Halen

    By Paul Brannigan

    From Louder:

    The acclaimed biography 'Unchained: The Eddie Van Halen Story' by Classic Rock writer Paul Brannigan came out in the UK earlier this year.

    Now, with a US edition available to order, we're publishing the book's introduction to gave fans a taste of what lies within its pages.

    Lost in music, Eddie Van Halen didn’t initially hear his wife screaming at him as he repeatedly pounded out the keyboard riff which had been living rent-free in his head for the best part of two years.

    Only later, listening back to his first demo recording of that percussive chord vamp, instantly recognisable now as the introduction to his band’s signature anthem Jump, could Eddie pick out the exasperated yells of “Shut up!” coming from the couple’s bedroom as he jabbed staccato triads on the synth on his living-room floor.

    In the earliest months of his residency in America, constantly hearing those same two words – from bullying teachers, from racist classmates, from the stressed, exhausted, homesick parents in the two families who shared the three-bedroom property in the Pasadena suburbs in which his own family was housed upon emigrating to California – caused the previously confident, happy-go-lucky, inquisitive Dutch youngster to withdraw deep into his own imagination.

    It wasn’t until he discovered rock’n’roll, and the liberating potential of an over-amplified electric guitar, that the young Eddie Van Halen found his voice and began to reimagine the world around him.

    That process began soon after he reached the age of majority, when, dissatisfied with the mass-produced ‘classic’ guitars that had helped democratise rock ’n’ roll for the generation which preceded him, he invented his own hybrid instrument, a bespoke ‘Frankenstrat’.

    He then set about creating a whole new vocabulary for this misshapen mongrel as, alongside his elder brother Alex, he negotiated a life in music with the band that bore his surname.

    Still he was told to shut up: by club owners who wanted their patrons sedated with familiar pop standards; by buzz-kill cops who’d gatecrash the chaotic, over-subscribed backyard parties Van Halen played every weekend, barking dispersal orders at hundreds of high-school students flipping the bird skywards at the hovering Pasadena Police Department helicopter; even, with increasing regularity, by the needy, limelight-addicted, man-child singer by his side. But the guitarist would be silent no more.

    The release of Van Halen’s dazzling self-titled debut album in February 1978 shifted the course of rock ’n’ roll history. As with debut sets from the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Ramones, Public Enemy and N.W.A., it created a fresh, original, revitalising blueprint for music with attitude.

    Let’s be clear: while it emerged at a time when disco and new wave had captured the popular imagination, Van Halen didn’t ‘save’ hard rock and heavy metal – no rock fan in 1978 listening to Powerage or Live and Dangerous or Stained Class or Hemispheres or Tokyo Tapes considered the genre on its knees, and the nascent New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement which would propel Iron Maiden and Def Leppard into US arenas within five years owed precisely nothing to the Pasadena party rockers – but Eddie’s innovative, incandescent guitar-playing undoubtedly lit a new fire under the genre.

    And with Eruption, his jaw-dropping 102-second solo showcase, blending laser-guided hammer-ons and pull-offs, blur-speed neo-classical triplets, two-handed legato tapping and gravity-drop whammy-bar plunges, the twenty three-year-old guitarist established a new Year Zero for his fellow players. On hearing it, guitarists inevitably had two questions: "How the fuck is he doing that?" and "How can I copy it?"

    The most iconic instrumental showcase since Jimi Hendrix’s Woodstock savaging of The Star-Spangled Banner, Eruption served to bisect hard rock’s timeline into ‘Pre-EVH’ and ‘Post-EVH’, creating both a generation of inferior copycat technicians and, arguably of greater significance, a subculture of ‘alternative rock’ guitarists who, awed and daunted by Eddie’s virtuosity, sought to focus instead on fashioning less technical, more individualistic approaches to playing the instrument.

    Eddie, of course, had his own influences – early Eric Clapton, Alvin Lee, Jimmy Page, Pete Townshend, Jeff Beck and Allan Holdsworth to name but a few – but in terms of a mindset and modus operandi underpinning his approach to the guitar, it may be instructive to remove any identification with England’s rock aristocracy and, instead, re-centre Eddie spiritually with California’s Z-Boys skateboard crew of the mid-1970s – Tony Alva, Jay Adams, Stacy Peralta, Peggy Oki – fearless, questing, daredevil athletes who constantly pushed boundaries, both physical and psychological.

    Like Tony Alva with a wooden deck and polyurethane wheels beneath his feet, Eddie felt at his most weightless with wood and wires in his hands – uncontainable, unstoppable, unchained. As with the Z-Boys launching themselves into empty suburban Californian swimming pools, Eddie’s approach to guitar solos was to leap into the unknown, with no preconceived idea of where, or indeed how, he might land and no fear of the descent.

    Like a skater, too, he viewed the bumps and dips of the landscape stretching before him as a space for free expression, and where others saw obstacles, he saw opportunities. "Edward has a sense of adventure," David Lee Roth once noted approvingly. "He will dive headfirst. We’ll see if there’s water in the pool later."

    I met Eddie Van Halen only once, at his 5150 studio facility in the grounds of his Los Angeles home, in spring 1998. With its twin-seater SEGA Daytona USA racing game, Twister pinball machine, Asteroids arcade game, widescreen TV and racks of video cassettes and CDs, the studio’s reception room resembled a teenage boy’s idea of an adult male’s home, but the juxtaposition, in the kitchen, of a photograph of Eddie and Alex’s childhood home in Nijmegen, Holland, with a huge, gleaming Recording Industry Association of America presentation plaque acknowledging their group’s 60 million US record sales was a striking reminder of just how far Jan and Eugenia Van Halen’s boys had come.

    The man of the house could not have been more gracious or hospitable, proffering non-alcoholic beers before taking a seat on a black couch alongside his band’s new vocalist, former Extreme frontman Gary Cherone, ready to talk up Van Halen’s third act, which was being heralded by the St Patrick’s Day release of the quartet’s eleventh studio album, Van Halen III. He spoke about his love for his six-year-old son Wolfie, telling how the pair would take trips together to the beach to collect stones to fashion into plectrums, and shared his regret at the demands of his job taking him away from his actress wife, Valerie Bertinelli.

    Speaking of his pressing need for a hip replacement operation, he noted, "I’m just a fucking old jerk like anyone else." But when he picked up one of his signature series guitars and began tapping out the riff to Drop Dead Legs on the fretboard, his well-lined face seemed to shed the wear and tear of the past fifteen years in an instant.

    Over the course of the next hour, as he shared war stories from his twenty-five years in the rock’n’roll business, that guitar never left his hands. It sang, it roared, it squealed, it grumbled, it spat, and often it seemed to laugh aloud, with Eddie smiling and laughing too, seemingly scarcely able to believe the sounds he was making.

    Notoriously wary of journalists – "No one really understands what I’m trying to say," he once complained to Guitar Player magazine’s Jas Obrecht, the writer who conducted Eddie’s very first media interview in 1978 and became a trusted confidante – he placed his own Dictaphone on the table alongside mine as our interview began.

    It was only years later, as I read more about his working methods, that I realised that his tape recorder wasn’t rolling to ensure that his words would not be misquoted in a publication he would surely never read, but rather to capture the riffs and musical motifs which streamed unselfconsciously from his fingers as he spoke, lest there might be gold buried in the deep.

    In conversation with US writer, and avowed fan, Chuck Klosterman for Billboard magazine in 2015, Eddie confessed that he couldn’t recall writing the iconic riffs to any of his band’s biggest songs, having written the vast majority of them while drunk and wired on high-grade cocaine. When he shared with me his belief that, in the past, his excessive drinking was born from a desire to mask the fact that he considered himself ‘the most insecure fuck you’ll ever meet in your life’, it was hard not to wonder whether his tried and trusted methodology of drinking in order to create hadn’t contributed, over the years, to a debilitating sense of imposter syndrome.

    Van Halen III, he proudly declared, was the first album he’d written while completely sober. Somewhat cruelly, it was also, inarguably, the worst album ever released under the Van Halen name, and although Eddie spoke that afternoon of ‘making music until I die’, in his remaining twenty-two years on the planet he would never again release a full album of new songs, with Van Halen’s final album, 2012’s A Different Kind of Truth, being largely composed of reworkings of previously unreleased demo tracks originally recorded between 1974 and 1977.

    In quiet moments, the indignity must surely have stung the maestro. “There’s an old Russian saying: “There’s no more lines in that guy’s stomach," David Lee Roth told the LA Times in 2012, as A Different Kind of Truth was released. “It means somebody got fat and slow. There are still a lot of lines in Eddie’s stomach.”

    Eddie Van Halen’s death, aged sixty-five, on 6 October 2020, elicited a huge outpouring of grief and love from his fellow musicians, many of whom saluted him as ‘the Mozart of the guitar’.

    "He was the real deal," said Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page, "he pioneered a dazzling technique on guitar with taste and panache that I felt always placed him above his imitators."

    "Eddie was a guitar wonder, his playing pure wizardry," said AC/DC’s Angus Young. "To the world of music, he was a special gift." Queen’s Brian May hailed his friend as "probably the most original and dazzling rock guitarist in history", while The Who’s Pete Townshend, another friend, simply called him "the Great American Guitar Player".

    Putting the finishing touches to this book in the spring of 2021, six months after Eddie’s death, I dug out the copy of Kerrang! magazine in which my 1998 interview with the guitarist was published. The closing lines of the piece, perhaps inevitably, seemed to carry more gravitas and weight in the wake of his passing. "Music is not a competition," he told me, "and hopefully when I’m gone, there’ll be something that will stay with people, and move them. Whether that’ll be ten people, or ten million people, that’ll be my mission here accomplished."

    In the article’s concluding paragraphs, I had referenced the fact that Eddie freely admitted that he had never attempted to keep up with trends in modern music. He had revealed that most recently he’d been listening to Bob Dylan’s thirtieth studio album, 1997’s Time Out of Mind, but that his CD of the album kept sticking on track three.

    Now, out of curiosity, I identified the song, Standing in the Doorway, and decided to listen to it as a way of paying my own respects to Eddie. A song about growing old and reflecting on days gone by, it’s written from the perspective of an ageing narrator who smokes, strums a ‘gay guitar’ and recognises that, soon enough, he’ll be meeting once more with the ghosts of his past.

    That seems like a fitting elegy for Eddie Van Halen, an artist who’ll forever be enshrined in the collective consciousness standing on a stage, smiling broadly, listening in wonderment to the sounds being conjured from his home-made guitar, hard rock’s own Peter Pan, a free-spirited soul who never grew up but who learned how to fly.

    Published by Permuted Press, Unchained: The Eddie Van Halen Story is available to order now from Van Halen Store.

    The UK version of the book, titled Eruption, published by Faber and Faber, is on-sale now.

    Louder is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site.
    "I met Eddie only once, but still decided to write a book about him."
    Little Dreamer

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Dreamer View Post
    "I met Eddie only once, but still decided to write a book about him."
    The first time I heard Eddie play guitar, I knew dozens of books would someday be written about him.
    "It's so lonely at the top because it's so crowded at the bottom" - Diamond David Lee Roth

    "The truth sounds like hate to those who hate the truth" - Todd Wagner

    "Women and Children First ... The REAL Van Halen III"

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    This guy is a good writer.

    But his legitimacy to write about EVH is close to zero. Brad Tolinski spent weeks with Eddie at 5150 (cumulatively), and then wrote a book. This dude spent two hours. The whole book will be quotes of interviews by Steven Rosen and Jas Obrecht, people who really interacted with Ed on a deep level.
    EVH was a very complex person, so I take issue with people who didn't know him writing about him.
    Little Dreamer

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Dreamer View Post
    This guy is a good writer.

    But his legitimacy to write about EVH is close to zero. Brad Tolinski spent weeks with Eddie at 5150 (cumulatively), and then wrote a book. This dude spent two hours. The whole book will be quotes of interviews by Steven Rosen and Jas Obrecht, people who really interacted with Ed on a deep level.
    EVH was a very complex person, so I take issue with people who didn't know him writing about him.
    He has two hours more legitimacy than 99% of people on this planet.

    And definitely more than anybody on a VH message board claiming he is illegitimate.


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    It seems like a lot of books that get released about Eddie are just a bunch of old quotes from Guitar World and various other guitar magazines that have been reprinted a thousand times. And I've read those interviews a thousand times. I guess they are fine for someone who isn't a die hard fan.
    Leave everything to me!-Powdered Toast Man

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Dreamer View Post
    This guy is a good writer.

    But his legitimacy to write about EVH is close to zero. Brad Tolinski spent weeks with Eddie at 5150 (cumulatively), and then wrote a book. This dude spent two hours. The whole book will be quotes of interviews by Steven Rosen and Jas Obrecht, people who really interacted with Ed on a deep level.
    EVH was a very complex person, so I take issue with people who didn't know him writing about him.
    That's about the silliest thing I've ever read on here.

    Being a good writer and researcher is 1,000 times more important than whether or not you knew the person.
    If I don't respond to you it means I have you on ignore, which means you are a douchenozzle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave's Dreidel View Post
    That's about the silliest thing I've ever read on here.

    Being a good writer and researcher is 1,000 times more important than whether or not you knew the person.
    I'm saying this after reading the intro here. Where he quotes other journalists. Greg Renoff never met Eddie either. But he accessed new sources to write VH Rising - a legitimate, well-researched book. He didn't spend his time quoting other writers.

    I'm a professional writer, have met Eddie once, and been on this site for 20 years. Hey, I could write yet another EVH book. I have all the old Guitar Worlds too.
    Little Dreamer

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    Oh so now its "my approved VH writer better than your writer "?

    Who gives a fuck as long as the fans are happy (Bennet exception)? It's like that bullshit we as fans aren't allowed to buy any VH merchandise except one fucking approved store on the internet.

    Guess what? I bought an official EVH beanie off of Ebay for less money. The HORROR!

    I'm a criminal and and stealing money from Wolfs trust fund.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Dreamer View Post

    I'm a professional writer, have met Eddie once, and been on this site for 20 years.
    Hey, I could write yet another EVH book. I have all the old Guitar Worlds too.
    You should have.

    Probably missed the boat with that one though, considering the market is fairly saturated by now.


    How was your time at 5150 though? This is the first we池e hearing about it.


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    Puking at his own wedding, hitting on Heart: The legend of Eddie Van Halen
    By Larry Getlen

    December 13, 2021 | 4:30pm


    The new book "Unchained: The Eddie Van Halen Story" looks at how the legendary guitarist -- along with his wife Valerie Bertinelli and Van Halen band mates -- sometimes enjoyed the rock 'n' roll lifestyle too much.

    Guitar god Eddie Van Halen married “One Day at a Time” actress Valerie Bertinelli on April 11, 1981, with a $35,000 reception held at the mansion featured in Barbra Streisand’s version of “A Star is Born.”

    But while the early days of their marriage saw them portrayed as a dream couple, a new book “Unchained: The Eddie Van Halen Story” (Permuted Press) by Paul Brannigan, out Dec. 28, shows how Eddie’s wild lifestyle of sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll led to trouble from the outset.

    The wedding became a party extraordinaire, as Eddie and Van Halen singer David Lee Roth did “fat bumps of [cocaine] in a restroom, ‘taking turns holding each other around the waist so [they didn’t] plunge head first into the toilet from dry heaving.’”

    This scene would soon be repeated with Bertinelli, as tour manager Noel Monk discovered when he located the newly-married couple in the bathroom.

    “There I found Valerie in her beautiful white lace wedding gown, looking every inch the angel — except for the tears streaming down her cheeks,” Monk recalls in the book.

    “Valerie was holding her husband’s head over a toilet bowl, pulling his hair back to make sure it didn’t become encrusted with puke.”

    Eddie Van Halen, who died of cancer in October 2020, at age 65, was a groundbreaking guitarist who redefined the instrument like no one since Jimi Hendrix.

    A Dutch immigrant who came to the US with his family in 1962 at age seven, Eddie played gigs with his father, Jan, and older brother, Alex, from childhood. At these shows, Jan ushered Eddie into an unfortunate habit that would define much of his life.

    “My dad got me into drinking and smoking when I was 12,” Eddie recalled.

    “I was nervous, so he said to me, ‘Here. Have a shot of vodka.’ Boom — I wasn’t nervous anymore.”

    The brothers grew up to form their own band, with bassist Michael Anthony and singer David Lee Roth.

    One of Van Halen’s first big opportunities came in early 1976, when they opened for British rockers UFO at the Golden West Ballroom in Norwalk, Calif.

    They wowed the crowd and, after the show, a local drug dealer offered Eddie some “dynamite blow,” which he accepted. Ten minutes later, Alex saw his brother collapse, and ran to him. Eddie had unknowingly snorted PCP.

    He went into spasms and was rushed to a hospital, where he was strapped to an operating table as an oxygen tube was forced down his throat.

    “I actually died on the table,” Eddie later said. “When I woke up the doctor said, ‘Your heart stopped. If it was thirty seconds later, we couldn’t have brought you back.’”

    Van Halen’s self-titled debut album, released in 1978 and recorded on a steady diet of morning beer and cocaine, introduced the rock world to its next legendary band, and the members tried every day to live up to the party attitude their music promised.

    ‘No one wore condoms, and it was just a big bone-fest, day after day‘

    After playing their first out-of-state headline show at a club in Madison, Wis., the band celebrated by “laying waste to their accommodations on the seventh floor of the Madison Sheraton hotel,” Brannigan writes. “They hosted fire-extinguisher battles in the corridors, taped frozen fish to the ceilings and reduced the in-room furnishings to match wood,”

    In May, while opening for Black Sabbath in Aberdeen, Scotland, the band received word that their debut album had gone gold, signifying sales of over 500,000 copies. They celebrated by getting “thoroughly s–t-faced on Glenmorangie whiskey.”

    “We took shoe polish and wrote our logo all over the walls,” Eddie later recalled. “The next morning the cops came and escorted us out of the country, not because we wasted their hotel, but because one of our crew stole a pillow!”

    The band, fronted by David Lee Roth, played up their wild persona by trashing hotel rooms, doing a lot of drugs and sleeping with groupies.

    Van Halen fell so deeply into their roles as emerging rock gods that at one point, someone captured a “graphic, X-rated, home-made [pornographic film] featuring the band members and enthusiastic female fans.”

    According to Brannigan, this led to a bizarre incident where their manager, Marshall Berle — nephew of comic Milton Berle, who MC’ed the party at the all-nude strip club the Body Shop where the band were presented with their first platinum albums — showed the footage to staff at Van Halen’s label, Warner Bros. Records.

    The band was so enraged by this betrayal that, in addition to firing Marshall Berle, they enacted an appropriately rock ’n’ roll revenge.

    “[They] elected to retaliate by breaking into [Marshall’s] Hollywood office with Noel Monk and stripping the room of everything bearing the Van Halen name — gold discs, memorabilia, promotional items and more.”

    “One Day At A Time” actress Valerie Bertinelli met Eddie Van Halen when she was enlisted to help her brothers — big Van Halen fans — get backstage.

    By their 1980 European tour, Van Halen had turned into a traveling orgy, as, according to Monk, “the sex never stopped, and the groupies never went away.”

    “Everyone likes to think they’re the bad boys of rock n roll, but the things I witnessed with Van Halen were the most debauched,” said veteran rock photographer Neil Zlozower in the book.

    “They had the hottest chicks you could imagine. There would be, like, 75 girls in the hotel room. Back then, it was pre-AIDS, no one wore condoms, and it was just a big bone-fest, day after day. Even just being the photographer, I got two or three chicks every night.”

    Eddie and Alex Van Halen tried to seduce another pair of rock ’n’ roll siblings

    In their 2013 memoir, Ann and Nancy Wilson — the siblings who front the band Heart — recalled meeting the brothers Van Halen in 1979.


    The Van Halen brothers tried to seduce the sisters of Heart, Ann (left) and Nancy Wilson. The ladies turned them down.

    “Eddie and Alex let it be known that if Ann and I wanted to sleep with them, they would be amenable to that,” Nancy wrote. “The concept was two brothers with two sisters … except they wanted us in one bed. It wasn’t the only time we had that offer, and as with every other request, we turned it down.”

    For their 1980 tour, Van Halen changed their rider — the contract that dictates a band’s backstage requirements — to include a demand for M&Ms, with the provision that there be “absolutely no brown ones.” This became legendary, with many interpreting it as a sign that the band had gone off the egomaniacal deep end.

    In reality, the outrageous clause had a greater purpose. The band’s technical stage requirements were precise and essential, and failure to implement them could cause the band harm. If their dressing room had brown M&Ms, they would know the rider hadn’t been read — and that they needed to review the stage set-up for their own safety.

    For those who hadn’t read it, the repercussions could be severe, as the band applied their hotel-destroying expertise to backstage dressing rooms.

    But the unusual provision had one very positive outcome, as without it, Eddie would never have met his future wife Bertinelli.

    By the time Van Halen rolled into Shreveport, La., for an August 1980 show, the brown M&M clause had become iconic. A radio DJ happened offered local brothers David and Patrick Bertinelli — big Van Halen fans — tickets and backstage passes if they could “sweet-talk their celebrity sister into presenting each of the four band members with a bag of M&Ms backstage.”

    Valerie, then 20 and a cast member on the hit sitcom “One Day At A Time,” agreed for her brothers’ sake. But at the venue, she was quickly enamored with guitar player Eddie, telling her brother Patrick, “Oh my God — what a cutie!”

    The couple remained together for 20 years, separating in 2001 and divorcing in 2007. Eddie got clean for good around 2008, and married actress and publicist Janie Liszewski the next year.

    Van Halen released one final, well-received album, with Roth on lead vocals and Eddie and Valerie’s son, Wolfgang, on bass, in 2012, followed by a successful worldwide tour.

    To those that saw Eddie in action around this time, he played like a man who had finally put his demons to rest.

    “His recent personal struggles seem to have been dealt with,” wrote Chris Epting for the heavy metal website Noisecreep.

    “He looks a bit heavier, but a lot healthier, and he played with the joy of a teenager, losing himself in the music while ripping off one ferocious solo after another. It was like seeing Van Halen’s classic ’80s videos all over again.”
    Beauty is life when life unveils
    her holy face.

    But you are life and you
    are the veil.

    Beauty is eternity gazing at itself
    in a mirror.

    But you are eternity
    and you are the mirror.

    -Kahil Gibran

 

 

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