MLB 2021 - Page 18
Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube
Register
Likes Likes:  195
Page 18 of 36 FirstFirst ... 81516171819202128 ... LastLast
Results 256 to 270 of 535

Thread: MLB 2021

  1. #256
    Emperor of VHLinks.com
    Brett's Avatar
    Join Date
    09.02.99
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    77,843
    Posts Per Day
    9.82
    Favorite VH Album

    Fair Warning
    Favorite VH Song

    Unchained
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 09:57 PM
    Likes (Given)
    395
    Likes (Received)
    2766
    Thanks (Given)
    2125
    Thanks (Received)
    14173

    Achievements:
    Pic PosterMaster PraiserSupremely-LikedElite Daily Poster350,000 VHL Life PointsThee King

    Default

    I think Kershaw at 26 won the MVP and the Cy Young in the same season.
    Webmaster
    VHLinks.com - The Internet's Largest Van Halen Fan Forum
    http://www.vhlinks.com

    Check Out My YouTube Guitar Videos!
    http://www.youtube.com/banoneguitar
    Direct Link To Subscribe To My Channel!
    http://www.youtube.com/banoneguitar?sub_confirmation=1

    Join the VHLinks Facebook Group!



  2. #257
    Hot For Teacher
    jimmy812's Avatar
    Join Date
    06.03.04
    Age
    50
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    12,158
    Posts Per Day
    1.96
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 04:37 PM
    Likes (Given)
    1931
    Likes (Received)
    1938
    Thanks (Given)
    1305
    Thanks (Received)
    657

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserVHLinks Proud!Knight Of Da RoundtableSupremely-Liked50,000 VHL Life Points

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett View Post
    I think Kershaw at 26 won the MVP and the Cy Young in the same season.
    Yup. Just looked at his stats. Another example of what I was talking about--Kershaw in 2013 has a 1.83 ERA for the season...yet had 9 losses. It's as if teams feel they don't have to try as hard when their stud is on the hill. But the following year made more sense. His ERA went down (1.77) and he only had 3 losses.

  3. #258
    carpe damn diem
    billy007's Avatar
    Join Date
    04.19.00
    Age
    57
    Location
    socially distant
    Posts
    32,179
    Posts Per Day
    4.18
    Favorite VH Song

    "Dance The Night Away"
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 06:43 PM
    Likes (Given)
    355
    Likes (Received)
    603
    Thanks (Given)
    1531
    Thanks (Received)
    2473


    Premium Member
    Achievements:
    Master PraiserSupremely-LikedElite Daily PosterVHLinks Proud!150,000 VHL Life PointsThee King

    Default

    they talked about it on one of the Marlins games earlier this year - their theory is that a guy like DeGrom or Kershaw is usually matched up with the other team's ace, that's why the run support isn't there.
    If you like what you see here, please click here to donate!

  4. #259
    Hot For Teacher
    bsbll4's Avatar
    Join Date
    02.18.03
    Age
    37
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    10,903
    Posts Per Day
    1.64
    Favorite VH Album

    Van Halen/ADKOT
    Favorite VH Song

    Hot For Teacher
    Last Online

    05.11.21 @ 09:02 AM
    Likes (Given)
    272
    Likes (Received)
    450
    Thanks (Given)
    1184
    Thanks (Received)
    3391

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserSupremely-LikedVHLinks Proud!50,000 VHL Life PointsKnight Of Da Roundtable

    Default

    Ok so I hate the Red Sox (losing two WS to them will do that), but I saw this article on Facebook and now I'm rooting for them to succeed. I've been saying this for the last two or three years, that Manfred and the rest of the people calling for rule changes need to give a few years to allow players and teams to adjust to find the equilibrium before they start drastically altering the game. Now the Red Sox are changing their approach and are leading the league in runs by *gasp* putting the ball in play. Granted, they have a $175 million payroll which is 7th highest in the league, but it could be a lesson for lower payroll teams to value guys that are high average again.

    That's what always seemed to be missing from the analysis that I've heard from the saber guys who point to launch angle and "creating the most runs" by hitting for power. While one guy hitting a single isn't going to produce a run very often when everyone else in the lineup is concerned about launch angle and striking out a ton, if an entire roster is focused on getting on base and putting the ball in play with solid contact, it will produce runs in aggregate. Not only that, but those guys probably cost less than the 35 HR guy which means teams with lower payroll could be more competitive. Of course the trouble is that players from the majors all the way down to the minors and even college have been so focused on launch angle and increasing their power to keep up with the trend that those guys are fewer and farther between.

    Don't ban the shift. Let teams adjust their approach or suffer the consequences.

    https://www.nbcsports.com/boston/red...suRTA3cW3isgyM

    The old-school Sox offense might just save baseball

    We all know what a chore it has been to watch baseball since the start of the launch angle revolution. The nadir might've been Game 3 of the 2018 World Series, when the Dodgers and Red Sox played forever before L.A. mercifully walked things off in the 18th inning.

    What should've been an instant classic instead landed immediately in the trash. Can you remember a single play between Jackie Bradley's game-tying homer in the eighth and Max Muncy's game-winner? I can recall but one: Ian Kinsler throwing away what should've been the final out of the 13th inning to guarantee the game would last over seven hours.

    In extra innings, the teams combined for 16 strikeouts and eight hits. May we collectively be anesthetized before being subjected to such "drama" again.

    At first glance, not much has changed this season. Strikeouts are once again not just up, but topping more than one per inning for the first time ever. Batting average is once again not just down, but has never been lower, not even during 1968's Year of the Pitcher.

    Then along come the Red Sox, who seem to be on a one-team quest to save the game.

    They improved to 11-6 on Monday with an 11-4 thrashing of the White Sox and All-Star right-hander Lucas Giolito that included 17 hits and three home runs.

    In the process they improved their baseball-best batting average to .288, more than 50 points above the all-time low league average of .233. They're scoring runs in a time warp, stringing together line drives and walks, hitting the ball the other way, and keeping the line moving.

    It's a far more entertaining product than the three boring outcomes sludgefest that baseball has become, and it raises a tantalizing possibility -- could the Red Sox and their throwback approach inspire enough copycats to start leading the game out of the darkness?

    "We bang," said outfielder Alex Verdugo recently, and do they ever.

    Their 96 runs lead baseball, as do their 165 hits and 40 doubles. Their 21 homers rank seventh, so it's not like they don't slug, but outside of a six-homer blitzkrieg in Baltimore a couple of weeks ago, that's not really how they're winning, either.

    More typical is how they walloped Giolito during a six-run first inning. Kiké Hernández led off with a solo homer and then the next five batters reached thusly: two opposite-field singles, two pulled singles, one bunt single. After a groundout scored one run, Franchy Cordero drove in two with a single the other way and Bobby Dalbec worked a 14-pitch walk to cement that it wasn't going to be Giolito's day.

    "It started with Enrique and then the line kept moving," manager Alex Cora said. "It was probably the best inning of this short season, line drive after drive, quality at-bat after quality at-bat against a good pitcher, one of the best in the league, and it was fun to see."

    The Red Sox clearly do not feel beholden to one approach, and the diversity of their attack makes them so much more challenging to face than a squad of launch-angle cricketers. They've swung at more first pitches than any team in the American League, and they're not missing mistakes. Per Baseball Savant, they've swung at more meatballs (86 percent) than any team in baseball.

    Hernández, the leadoff man, likes to hunt fastballs. No. 2 hitter Alex Verdugo sprays the ball from corner to corner, with a single to left on Thursday on a fastball away and then a long homer over the bullpen on a fastball down and in. J.D. Martinez, Xander Bogaerts, and Rafael Devers can hit everything.

    Catcher Christian Vazquez provides surprising pop. Second baseman Christian Arroyo is a line-drive hitter. Cordero has shown a surprisingly ability to go the other way. Dalbec and Hunter Renfroe should eventually bring power to the bottom of the order. Super utility Marwin Gonzalez leads the team in walks.

    This brand of baseball is so much better to watch than walk-K-homer-K-K, with balls consistently in play, runners going first to third, and rallies actually sustainable. The Red Sox are putting nearly 27 percent of their balls into play to the opposite field, good for eighth in baseball, and suggesting more than just a once-size-fits-all attack aimed at the moon.

    It's the way things used to be, and let's hope the formula entices rivals to play copycat. Baseball needs excitement, and the Red Sox are showing the way.
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

  5. jimmy812, billy007 Liked This Post
  6. #260
    Hot For Teacher
    jimmy812's Avatar
    Join Date
    06.03.04
    Age
    50
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    12,158
    Posts Per Day
    1.96
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 04:37 PM
    Likes (Given)
    1931
    Likes (Received)
    1938
    Thanks (Given)
    1305
    Thanks (Received)
    657

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserVHLinks Proud!Knight Of Da RoundtableSupremely-Liked50,000 VHL Life Points

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bsbll4 View Post
    Ok so I hate the Red Sox (losing two WS to them will do that), but I saw this article on Facebook and now I'm rooting for them to succeed. I've been saying this for the last two or three years, that Manfred and the rest of the people calling for rule changes need to give a few years to allow players and teams to adjust to find the equilibrium before they start drastically altering the game. Now the Red Sox are changing their approach and are leading the league in runs by *gasp* putting the ball in play. Granted, they have a $175 million payroll which is 7th highest in the league, but it could be a lesson for lower payroll teams to value guys that are high average again.

    That's what always seemed to be missing from the analysis that I've heard from the saber guys who point to launch angle and "creating the most runs" by hitting for power. While one guy hitting a single isn't going to produce a run very often when everyone else in the lineup is concerned about launch angle and striking out a ton, if an entire roster is focused on getting on base and putting the ball in play with solid contact, it will produce runs in aggregate. Not only that, but those guys probably cost less than the 35 HR guy which means teams with lower payroll could be more competitive. Of course the trouble is that players from the majors all the way down to the minors and even college have been so focused on launch angle and increasing their power to keep up with the trend that those guys are fewer and farther between.

    Don't ban the shift. Let teams adjust their approach or suffer the consequences.

    https://www.nbcsports.com/boston/red...suRTA3cW3isgyM

    The old-school Sox offense might just save baseball
    It's not rocket science. Although many will approach the game and its endless statistics as such.

    I understand what you're saying. Yes, I'm rooting for the approach to catch on. But no way in fucking hell am I rooting for the Red Sox.

    Btw, they also lost 2 games to the White Sox over the weekend--one of them was against Dallas Keuchel and his 5+ ERA and the other they lost to a committee of no-names and were only able to "bang" out 4 hits.
    Sorry, just felt that needed to be mentioned.

  7. #261
    Hot For Teacher
    bsbll4's Avatar
    Join Date
    02.18.03
    Age
    37
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    10,903
    Posts Per Day
    1.64
    Favorite VH Album

    Van Halen/ADKOT
    Favorite VH Song

    Hot For Teacher
    Last Online

    05.11.21 @ 09:02 AM
    Likes (Given)
    272
    Likes (Received)
    450
    Thanks (Given)
    1184
    Thanks (Received)
    3391

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserSupremely-LikedVHLinks Proud!50,000 VHL Life PointsKnight Of Da Roundtable

    Default

    So I happened to be listening the radio at lunch time and the local ESPN guys were talking with Brian Kenny who is a huge sabermetrics guy for MLB Network. They were trying to get an explanation on Matt Carpenter: he's elite in barrel % and exit velocity, so how the hell is he so bad? Through the course of discussion, something I've always wondered was true was revealed: those "expected" numbers that managers and players point to when they are hitting poorly and chalk up to bad luck only take exit velocity and launch angle into the equation. In other words, there is no metric that takes into account where you hit the ball, which is why Matt Carpenter is doing so terrible (and the trend is similar with other players across baseball) when he hits the ball hard to the right side where there are 7 defenders dutifully waiting to catch his solidly hit ball.

    It seemed like Brian Kenny, who is up on this stuff as anyone, was completely surprised by this notion and said he was going to do a write up on Carpenter soon because "they may be on to something." No shit?

    It's easy to extrapolate on this if it's true. For players that have spent the last 5 seasons focused on those two metrics, exit velocity and launch angle, they've been told that if they get those numbers at an ideal range they will be more successful. That was true (and still can be), except when players started catering their swing to be in one plane to get the best result, their spray charts started getting way more predictable. By the defense taking the location of those hits into account they were able to adjust accordingly and now the number of hits plummets. Now those "expected" runs that would be produced by hard hit line drives are driven right at someone for an out. Also, by making their hitting more one dimensional they are more susceptible to striking out. Why make contact with 2 strikes when the only thing that matters over 162 games is hitting the ball as hard as possible? That's what they are being told from the top down.

    I have to say I was surprised that someone like Brian Kenny would be so intrigued by this. Either he is A) not as informed on the analytics teams are using as he thinks, or B) teams have been relying on bad data to drive organizational decisions and the way they coach which is leading to the results we're seeing. I'd like to think it's A due to all of the really smart people that have been brought into front offices over the years, but I almost wonder if group think has driven things to the point that it really is more option B.

    Just looking at historical data for the MLB Totals by year, and it seems like the number of runs has stayed relatively consistent. That's strange when you consider all of the sabermetricians pounding the idea into fans' and players' heads that if you just hit the ball harder every time you will score more runs. That doesn't seem to be the case.

    The average runs per game hasn't been any higher the last few years than it was in the mid 2000s and only slightly higher than the 70's and 80's when parks were bigger and players were smaller. The number of doubles is slightly less than it was 15 years ago, but it's still higher than it was in the 60's, 70's, and 80's. Triples are down, but that's likely because there are only a handful of players that can get triples consistently because of the lack of speed in the game in deference for bigger guys who can mash (and, again, the smaller ball parks). Interestingly the number of walks is about the same as it's always been. So if homers are up, doubles and walks are the same, and triples are down, what's the deal? It's far fewer singles. There is almost one less hit a game today than there was 12 years ago and two less than there was 90 years ago, and it's on pace to be lowest amount ever.

    Also, the red headed step child of sabermetrics, the sacrifice, is at it's lowest point ever. Sacrifice flies are pretty consistent, but the bunt is almost gone from the game (and soon to be completely eliminated when the universal DH is instated...so we can get one more AB with the three true outcomes rather than something different happening). HBPs are up slightly, mostly because of the "I'm a bitch" body armor these guys where so they have no fear. Interestingly, the Intentional Walk, while easier than ever now that you can simply avoid throwing those four pitches, is at its lowest ever. Why? Because since every player is more likely to strikeout than ever before, teams are willing to take the risk.

    What this tells us is that are hits to be had out there on the field, but players have pigeon holed themselves into a predictable model where defenses can lean heavily on the percentages and beat them at their own game. Bottom line, it's on the batters to adjust, and the ones that do will not only be more successful in the long run, but they can save the game of baseball from itself.
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

  8. It's Mike, rchop84, jimmy812 Liked This Post
  9. #262
    Hot For Teacher
    jimmy812's Avatar
    Join Date
    06.03.04
    Age
    50
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    12,158
    Posts Per Day
    1.96
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 04:37 PM
    Likes (Given)
    1931
    Likes (Received)
    1938
    Thanks (Given)
    1305
    Thanks (Received)
    657

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserVHLinks Proud!Knight Of Da RoundtableSupremely-Liked50,000 VHL Life Points

    Default

    While I'm not a particularly big fan of all the sabermetrics stuff, I do find it fascinating. And as exhaustive as Brian Kenney can be sometimes about it, I'm always interested in what he has to say. Looking forward to hearing his take on Carpenter. By the way, I stumbled upon the Cards game last night and Carpenter was up--must've been his 2nd AB. He ended up striking out with 3 whiffs and I believe a foul ball mixed in. But all 3 swings were as if he was trying to launch the ball into the upper deck. Was his swing always like that?

    The game drowns itself with statistics but it seems it's gone way too far now. "See ball, hit ball" is obviously over-simplifying it, but we need to come back a bit to that philosophy, with a few tweaks. Like the article bsbll posted about the stupid Red Sox seemingly returning to a plan of filling their roster with contact hitters. In other words, common sense.

  10. #263
    Hot For Teacher
    bsbll4's Avatar
    Join Date
    02.18.03
    Age
    37
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    10,903
    Posts Per Day
    1.64
    Favorite VH Album

    Van Halen/ADKOT
    Favorite VH Song

    Hot For Teacher
    Last Online

    05.11.21 @ 09:02 AM
    Likes (Given)
    272
    Likes (Received)
    450
    Thanks (Given)
    1184
    Thanks (Received)
    3391

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserSupremely-LikedVHLinks Proud!50,000 VHL Life PointsKnight Of Da Roundtable

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy812 View Post
    While I'm not a particularly big fan of all the sabermetrics stuff, I do find it fascinating. And as exhaustive as Brian Kenney can be sometimes about it, I'm always interested in what he has to say. Looking forward to hearing his take on Carpenter. By the way, I stumbled upon the Cards game last night and Carpenter was up--must've been his 2nd AB. He ended up striking out with 3 whiffs and I believe a foul ball mixed in. But all 3 swings were as if he was trying to launch the ball into the upper deck. Was his swing always like that?

    The game drowns itself with statistics but it seems it's gone way too far now. "See ball, hit ball" is obviously over-simplifying it, but we need to come back a bit to that philosophy, with a few tweaks. Like the article bsbll posted about the stupid Red Sox seemingly returning to a plan of filling their roster with contact hitters. In other words, common sense.
    No, he's taken a much more drastic upper cut to his swing in the last few years. I'm obviously not as talented as him, but I always found it extremely difficult to hit the ball consistently with that type of an uppercut. Your margin for error is basically zero where if you don't hit the ball perfectly you pop it up or hit a weak groundout. I was always taught (and this makes intuitive sense) that you want to keep you bat in the strikezone for as long as possible so you are more likely to make solid contact. A level swing where you take the knob of the bat at the ball and let the bat whip through the zone would produce the best results. Anyway, I'm typing this away on a computer at a desk job while he makes $18 million a year to K 3 times a night, so what the hell do I know?

    I've also never been a huge saber guy, but I do value data. The question I always had lingering in the back of my mind, though, was how valuable that data was when the circumstances are removed. It seems like there are so many variables to account for when crunching these numbers it's almost impossible to derive a single truth, so sabermetrics basically ignore the variables and say that given enough data those variables will even out. I don't think that's necessarily the case, which is why I think swinging for high risk, high reward early in the count or on and more to contact later in the count will make the most sense just about every time. Make the defense earn the out. The only times it doesn't make sense is when you are at a high risk of hitting into a double play. Still, the likelihood of it being turned is largely dependent on the player involved and the defense of the other team, and that can't be ignored.
    Last edited by bsbll4; 04.20.21 at 01:15 PM.
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

  11. #264
    Hot For Teacher
    jimmy812's Avatar
    Join Date
    06.03.04
    Age
    50
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    12,158
    Posts Per Day
    1.96
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 04:37 PM
    Likes (Given)
    1931
    Likes (Received)
    1938
    Thanks (Given)
    1305
    Thanks (Received)
    657

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserVHLinks Proud!Knight Of Da RoundtableSupremely-Liked50,000 VHL Life Points

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bsbll4 View Post
    No, he's taken a much more drastic upper cut to his swing in the last few years. I'm obviously not as talented as him, but I always found it extremely difficult to hit the ball consistently with that type of an uppercut. Your margin for error is basically zero where if you don't hit the ball perfectly you pop it up or hit a weak groundout. I was always taught (and this makes intuitive sense) that you want to keep you bat in the strikezone for as long as possible so you are more likely to make solid contact. A level swing where you take the knob of the bat at the ball and let the bat whip through the zone would produce the best results. Anyway, I'm typing this away on a computer at a desk job while he makes $18 million a year to K 3 times a night, so what the hell do I know?

    I've also never been a huge saber guy, but I do value data. The question I always had lingering in the back of my mind, though, was how valuable that data was when the circumstances are removed. It seems like there are so many variables to account for when crunching these numbers it's almost impossible to derive a single truth, so sabermetrics basically ignore the variables and say that given enough data those variables will even out. I don't think that's necessarily the case, which is why I think swinging for high risk, high reward early in the count or on and more to contact later in the count will make the most sense just about every time. Make the defense earn the out. The only times it doesn't make sense is when you are at a high risk of hitting into a double play. Still, the likelihood of it being turned is largely dependent on the player involved and the defense of the other team, and that can't be ignored.
    Yeah, I obviously haven't been able to follow Carpenter's career too closely but I knew he was talented and a good hitter at one time. But after seeing that AB last night, I didn't think he achieved that success with such an upper cut swing. Your breakdown is spot on...and, apparently a bit old school. LOL I was taught the same thing you were--keep the bat in the strike zone for as long as possible. Certainly made it easier to go opposite field. No wonder why Matt's numbers are down and the shift is so successful against him.

  12. #265
    Runnin' With The Devil
    MD 5150's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.15.20
    Posts
    1,669
    Posts Per Day
    7.78
    Favorite VH Album

    5150
    Favorite VH Song

    Summer Nights, Dreams
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 08:53 PM
    Likes (Given)
    1988
    Likes (Received)
    562
    Thanks (Given)
    0
    Thanks (Received)
    0

    Achievements:
    Elite Daily PosterWell-Liked5,000 VHL Life PointsMaster Praiser3 Months Registered

    Default

    If the hitting coaches can't do anything with Carpenter, maybe it's time to move on to someone that can make contact with the ball. This didn't start just recently.

  13. bsbll4 Liked This Post
  14. #266
    Hot For Teacher
    bsbll4's Avatar
    Join Date
    02.18.03
    Age
    37
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    10,903
    Posts Per Day
    1.64
    Favorite VH Album

    Van Halen/ADKOT
    Favorite VH Song

    Hot For Teacher
    Last Online

    05.11.21 @ 09:02 AM
    Likes (Given)
    272
    Likes (Received)
    450
    Thanks (Given)
    1184
    Thanks (Received)
    3391

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserSupremely-LikedVHLinks Proud!50,000 VHL Life PointsKnight Of Da Roundtable

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MD 5150 View Post
    If the hitting coaches can't do anything with Carpenter, maybe it's time to move on to someone that can make contact with the ball. This didn't start just recently.
    If you combine last year, spring training, and this year he's batting .163 across 190 ABs. It's either the most epic slump in the history of baseball and he's about to go on the biggest tear we've ever seen, or the book is out on him, he can't adjust, and his career is over.
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

  15. #267
    Top Of The World

    Join Date
    05.07.04
    Location
    Over Macho Grande
    Posts
    4,435
    Posts Per Day
    0.71
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 07:43 PM
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    189
    Thanks (Given)
    346
    Thanks (Received)
    600

    Achievements:
    Padawan PraiserWell-LikedKnight Of Da Roundtable25,000 VHL Life Points

    Default

    He's also gonna be 36 years old after the season, maybe he's just washed up
    Dealing with it.

  16. #268
    Runnin' With The Devil
    MD 5150's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.15.20
    Posts
    1,669
    Posts Per Day
    7.78
    Favorite VH Album

    5150
    Favorite VH Song

    Summer Nights, Dreams
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 08:53 PM
    Likes (Given)
    1988
    Likes (Received)
    562
    Thanks (Given)
    0
    Thanks (Received)
    0

    Achievements:
    Elite Daily PosterWell-Liked5,000 VHL Life PointsMaster Praiser3 Months Registered

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rchop84 View Post
    He's also gonna be 36 years old after the season, maybe he's just washed up
    Looking like he's done. Not sure why the Cardinals haven't come to this conclusion.

  17. #269
    Hot For Teacher
    bsbll4's Avatar
    Join Date
    02.18.03
    Age
    37
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    10,903
    Posts Per Day
    1.64
    Favorite VH Album

    Van Halen/ADKOT
    Favorite VH Song

    Hot For Teacher
    Last Online

    05.11.21 @ 09:02 AM
    Likes (Given)
    272
    Likes (Received)
    450
    Thanks (Given)
    1184
    Thanks (Received)
    3391

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserSupremely-LikedVHLinks Proud!50,000 VHL Life PointsKnight Of Da Roundtable

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rchop84 View Post
    He's also gonna be 36 years old after the season, maybe he's just washed up
    Quote Originally Posted by MD 5150 View Post
    Looking like he's done. Not sure why the Cardinals haven't come to this conclusion.
    Yep. I think they are trying to squeeze every last drop of production out of that $18 million contract, but it also has to do with lack of options. With Bader and O'Neill down, they had to put Tommy Edman in the OF because Lane Thomas was brutal and neither Austin Dean or Justin Williams have really shown much at this point. Once those guys get back I think Carp will be back to riding the pine...hopefully.
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

  18. #270
    Hot For Teacher
    jimmy812's Avatar
    Join Date
    06.03.04
    Age
    50
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    12,158
    Posts Per Day
    1.96
    Last Online

    Yesterday @ 04:37 PM
    Likes (Given)
    1931
    Likes (Received)
    1938
    Thanks (Given)
    1305
    Thanks (Received)
    657

    Achievements:
    Master PraiserVHLinks Proud!Knight Of Da RoundtableSupremely-Liked50,000 VHL Life Points

    Default

    How 'bout them A's!! Started off 0-6, just won their 11th in a row last night for a first place record of 12-7 now.

    They stole one last night from Minnesota. 10th inning, runner on 2nd (new rule), down by 2, with 2 outs. No hits in the inning and the A's end up winning. 2 walks and 2 horrible errors and it's over.

    https://www.mlb.com/news/a-s-walk-of...ed-10th-inning

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. 2021 NFL offseason thread.
    By edwardv in forum Play Ball!
    Replies: 183
    Last Post: Yesterday, 07:00 PM
  2. Easter 2021
    By Number 47 in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03.31.21, 11:03 PM
  3. Namm 2021
    By van77 in forum Guitar Room
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 03.30.21, 09:51 AM
  4. Happy Birthday Wolfgang 2021
    By Number 47 in forum Main VH Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03.17.21, 05:58 AM
  5. Auto Racing 2021
    By Raldo in forum Play Ball!
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02.22.21, 09:24 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •