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  1. #1
    Baluchitherium Heisenberg's Avatar
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    Default Warner Brother's Billboard Article

    New Billboard article just popped up.

    I noticed it on Greg Renoff's Van Halen Rising Twitter page today. Most of you probably know he's been working on Ted Templeman's official biography due next year.

    This article has nothing to do with that but is a pretty good read for those who might be interested about the famous WB Records Company & Building.

    Quotes from Ted Templeman, Mo Ostin, & Lenny Waronaker & others at WB.

    A couple blurbs about VH.

    Here's the link.

    https://www.billboard.com/articles/n...lodge-memories









    3/26/2019 by Katherine Turman




    As Warner Music Group employees look to the future from their new state-of-the-art office building in Downtown L.A.’s Arts District, many have also been fondly reminiscing on the past. Warner Bros. Records spent 44 years in the “ski lodge” at 3300 Warner Boulevard in Burbank, Calif. From 1975 to 2019 such iconic artists as Prince, Fleetwood Mac, Van Halen, Randy Newman and Neil Young freely roamed the homey, wood-clad hallways, performed on the patio, and, in the case of Young, lit up in conference rooms before it was legal in California.

    The ski lodge, built by famed architect A. Quincy Jones, is a “significant piece of late Modernism architecture. The building, which remains the property of Warner Bros. Pictures, was designed to be residential and welcoming; not a lot of office buildings do that,” explains Adrian Scott Fine, director of advocacy for the Los Angeles Conservancy. “Every space has a connection with a patio or a balcony or terrace or views to the outside.” He notes that one of Jones’ main contacts at Warner Bros. Records was beloved art director Ed Thrasher, who apparently gave the proviso that the 89,452-square-foot building must definitely not “look establishment” in order to further encourage the creative family vibe that the label cultivated when it came to its artists. “It wasn’t just a place to have your offices, it was more of an experience; that’s what makes it so special,” he notes.

    Its residents, past and present, agree. They shared their memories and favorite moments with Billboard.

    Ted Templeman, former executive vp, A&R; producer: When I started there we were in a Quonset hut, and I helped design the new building. We even put the A&R department in the basement so we could play our music loud. Prince used to come in the back way and use my office because he wouldn't have to see anyone. I started as a listener for $50 a week, then staff producer, vp, senior vp, executive vp. It was a great place. When I was there it was Steve Barri, Gary Katz, me, Tommy LiPuma, and Lenny Waronker [in the A&R department]. I remember just finishing “What A Fool Believes” by the Doobies after four nights of mixing it. I walked into the A&R meeting and said ‘I don't know what to do with this, it has no form, wanders all over the place, I had to play the drums to get the groove right… ready to bag it.’ They listened and said: ‘Are you crazy? It's great!’

    Christine Christensen, former sales coordinator: Working in the A&R Department was absolutely the best of times! I got to listen to a lot of submission tapes, work VIP section at concerts and took bands out on the town when they were in L.A. Teddy Templeman was head of the department and was producing Royal Crown Revue at the time. Ted was absolutely the kindest human being I have ever met, he treated us all so special. You would never know he was one of the most legendary producers of all time.

    Bob Merlis, former senior vp, worldwide corporate communications: I remember getting a phone call from David Lee Roth after the band had gone out on tour, probably the first tour [in 1978]. My assistant said, ‘David Lee Roth is on line one.’ I thought it was joke ‘cause, you know, how does this guy have my phone number? How did he even know my name? I wasn't hiding, but I wasn't really involved with Van Halen. I picked it up and he goes, ‘Hey man, I'm on tour and there's only dudes out here. How come there's no honeys?’ I said ‘WHAT?’ He complained to me about the demographic of the original Van Halen concert audience. What could I have done? Oh my God. Mars wants women, and so does Dave, you know?

    Lenny Waronker, senior vp of A&R: Rickie Lee Jones came in with a guitar and played about two and a half songs, which was all it took to realize she was great. I think it was just Ted Templeman and myself. That was a no-brainer. Van Dyke Parks came into my office before his first record, when he was working with Brian Wilson. He had his stuff, and for me, it was amazing, him sitting at the piano… though that may have been at the old building. One time, when Russ Titelman and I were releasing Rickie Lee Jones’ first record [in 1979], we had a meeting with her in Russ’s office, which was adjacent to mine, and she had a new idea for an arrangement for “Chuck E.'s in Love,” which was basically to slow it down. It gave it real attitude.




    Here's the link to read the rest of the full article & see the pictures.

    https://www.billboard.com/articles/n...lodge-memories
    Last edited by Heisenberg; 03.27.19 at 09:48 PM.

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  3. #2
    Eruption Simon Ribeiro's Avatar
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    08.21.19 @ 11:48 AM
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heisenberg View Post
    ...

    Ted Templeman, former executive vp, A&R; producer: When I started there we were in a Quonset hut, and I helped design the new building. We even put the A&R department in the basement so we could play our music loud. Prince used to come in the back way and use my office because he wouldn't have to see anyone. I started as a listener for $50 a week, then staff producer, vp, senior vp, executive vp. It was a great place. When I was there it was Steve Barri, Gary Katz, me, Tommy LiPuma, and Lenny Waronker [in the A&R department]. I remember just finishing “What A Fool Believes” by the Doobies after four nights of mixing it. I walked into the A&R meeting and said ‘I don't know what to do with this, it has no form, wanders all over the place, I had to play the drums to get the groove right… ready to bag it.’ They listened and said: ‘Are you crazy? It's great!’

    ...
    That's a cool story. I like What a Fool Believes. A real hit by DB.
    TT: "Wow, you can play acoustic guitar?"
    EVH: "Sure. What's the difference? It's got six strings... It's a guitar!" - 31.12.1978
    ___________________________________

    "Van Halen is entertainment. Van Halen is entertainment delivered at maximum impact, but it's entertainment." DLR

 

 

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