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    Default The American Health Care Act

    The American Health Care Act: What You Need to Know

    Obamacare has failed the American people. Over the past seven years, we’ve seen premiums skyrocket, choices dwindle, and government take more control over our health care. Left unchecked, the damage wrought by Obamacare would continue to spin out of control.

    Enter the American Health Care Act—legislation introduced today by House Republicans to repeal and replace Obamacare. Our plan will create an environment for universal access to quality, affordable health care. It will help create more choices, lower costs, and give back control to individuals and families. It will move decisions away from Washington and into state programs, doctors’ offices, and family living rooms.

    Of course, peace of mind is everything, and there will be a stable transition to make sure no one has the rug pulled out from under them. In addition, our plan takes care of people with pre-existing conditions and lets young adults stay on their parents’ plan. We will also work to ensure access to quality care for the poor and most vulnerable. Here’s how:

    Modernize Medicaid

    Medicaid is not sustainable in its current condition. By modernizing and strengthening the program, our reforms will empower states to create plans to best meet the specific needs of their citizens. It will put Medicaid on financial footing so it can do what it was designed to—protect the most vulnerable. It will help Americans in need of health coverage and return the focus of the program to its original intent.

    Introduce the Patient and State Stability Fund

    We have to repair the state insurance markets damaged by Obamacare. Our plan will do so through the Patient and State Stability Fund, allowing states to allocate resources in ways that will best take care of the most vulnerable of their populations. States can use these funds to support high-risk pools, cut out-of-pocket costs like premiums and deductibles, and promote health care accessibility. The Patient and State Stability Fund will give states the flexibility they need to care for their citizens.

    Enhance Health Savings Accounts (HSAs)

    Obamacare’s one-size-fits-all policies limit how individuals can spend and save their health care dollars. Our plan will do the opposite. By enhancing HSAs, we’ll empower individuals and families to spend their money how they see fit. This will create choice and competition among insurers. Ultimately, stronger HSAs will result in greater affordability and higher quality for Americans nationwide.

    Provide Advanceable, Refundable Monthly Tax Credits

    Obamacare subsidies are designed to drive people toward expensive, one-size-fits-all coverage—increasing costs and discouraging competition and work. After a stable transition period, our plan will repeal the open-ended subsidies and instead offer middle-income Americans an advanceable, refundable tax credit that empowers them as consumers. Available to those under a certain income who do not receive health coverage through work or a government program, these credits will be age-based, portable, and help create a true market for quality coverage. With this credit, we’ll incentivize competition to ensure there are quality, affordable plans for purchase.

    Eliminate Costly Insurance Mandates

    Obamacare mandates drive up the cost of coverage and stifle consumer choice. While the Trump administration has already acted to roll back the regulatory burdens of Obamacare, our plan will also reduce Washington control so consumers can more easily buy the kind of plan that fits their particular needs. These reforms will help provide consumers more affordable coverage options.

    Republicans made a promise to the American people—and today, we are turning those words into action. By repealing and replacing Obamacare, we will encourage greater choice, lower costs, and give power back to states and individuals.

    This is the American Health Care Act.



    http://www.speaker.gov/general/ameri...-you-need-know

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    Tax Credits under the Affordable Care Act vs. the American Health Care Act: An Interactive Map

    http://kff.org/interactive/tax-credi...teractive-map/

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    'Obamacare Lite'? Not Quite.

    What’s in the House Republicans’ new plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act?


    On Monday evening, the House Energy and Commerce and Ways and Means committees released the two long-awaited components of the House GOP’s plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Although intense secrecy from House aides and a hunt for the bill last week involving Senator Rand Paul and a gaggle of reporters had raised expectations of dramatic changes, the bills that will go into markup Wednesday in the committees look pretty similar to a draft version of the bill that leaked a few weeks ago.

    The two components—called the “American Health Care Act” in tandem—are intended to be passed by the reconciliation budgetary process, and as such only contain provisions that pertain to budgetary items, like the amount of the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate tax or the Medicaid funding granted to states. The whole bill has yet to be scored by the Congressional Budget Office, a critical step that will determine both the number of people projected to gain or lose coverage under the law, and the amount of spending or saving it would incur.

    In advance of that scoring, the general shape of the bill has been criticized from both sides even within Republican circles. Some, like the members of the more conservative Freedom Caucus in the House and Senator Rand Paul, have derided the tax credits as “Obamacare lite.” On the other side, some have blasted the idea of pulling Medicaid coverage away from sick, rural Americans who just became eligible under the ACA and enjoy their coverage. With the bill now public, it’s clear that while the framework does maintain some key Obamacare provisions, it also still would fundamentally reshape health policy—and reassign who reaps most of the benefits. Here’s a breakdown of what’s in the drafts:

    The American Health Care Act would reshape the Medicaid program and roll back Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion.

    First, the bill would roll back the ACA’s commitment to providing Medicaid funding for the so-called “expansion population,” or otherwise able-bodied, non-pregnant adults who qualified by their incomes under the ACA’s new rules. The bill doesn’t automatically take coverage away from those people, but it does end what’s called the “enhanced federal medical assistance percentage,” or FMAP, for them, whereby the federal government pays the vast majority share of their Medicaid costs. After 2020, states will no longer be allowed to enroll additional expansion adults, though those already covered will be allowed to remain covered if they don’t become ineligible for more than a month.

    There’s a much more radical change to Medicaid in the bill, though, and it involves the restructuring of the program’s federal funding to a hard per-capita cap. The full ramifications of that restructuring can be viewed in detail here, but suffice to say that states will probably be receiving less federal funds than before, and will have much less flexibility year-to-year in their spending. Additionally, the funding increases scheduled to allow Medicaid funding to keep up with medical inflation have been reduced from the original draft bill. Further provisions:

    -Bar providers that provide abortions from receiving Medicaid funding.
    - Remove some state flexibility in increasing the home-equity limit for Medicaid eligibility, whereby people are barred from Medicaid coverage if they have too much home equity.
    - Eliminate Essential Health Benefits requirements for certain Medicaid-covered plans, including requirements for mental-health services funding parity with other services.
    - Increase the frequency at which Medicaid enrollees are tested for eligibility.
    - Grant extra Medicaid provider reimbursement funds to states that didn’t expand Medicaid under Obamacare. Automatically disqualify any non-expansion state that chooses to expand before the expansion’s sunset in 2020.

    The American Health Care Act would replace Obamacare’s cost-sharing and tax credits with a refundable, age-rated, income-capped tax credit.

    The bill repeals the ACA’s cost-sharing reductions, where the federal government paid insurers to reduce the cost-sharing burden on enrollees based on their incomes. It also replaces the ACA’s age-rated, income-adjusted, cost-adjusted premium tax-credit for exchange plans with a more general refundable tax credit. That credit would still increase with age to accommodate their higher costs and would also contain some degree—though less on average than that of the ACA—of adjustment for income, but it would still not be adjusted to the average costs of the plans in particular markets.

    n order to quell that attacks that it is “Obamacare lite,” this new bill also places an income cap on the refundable tax credit, where individuals making over $75,000 would have their credit reduced by 10 percent of each additional dollar, meaning that for many people the tax credit for insurance would completely disappear over $100,000. Further provisions:

    -Reduce the qualifications that insurance has to meet to qualify for the credit, but also eliminate all grandfathered and “grandmothered” plans from creditability.
    - Establish that a person’s main tax-credit-qualifying insurance can’t cover abortion, but they can purchase supplemental coverage that provides it.
    - Keep the ACA’s ban on barring people from insurance for pre-existing conditions.
    - Establish a penalty for not having continuous insurance, where insurers can charge people 30 percent more in premiums for a year if they went two months or more without insurance recently. It’s not quite an individual mandate, but it’s still kind of an individual mandate.

    The American Health Care Act would repeal the mandates and just about all of the other taxes that pay for the Affordable Care Act.

    This is where it gets really tricky for the CBO scoring. The new proposed bill cuts almost all of the revenue-generating pieces of Obamacare, from its tanning taxes to its medical-device taxes. The individual mandate to purchase insurance and the employer mandate to provide it are levied as taxes, and the Republican plan would repeal those as well. Although this plan will probably lower long-term Medicaid outlays, it’s unclear if the relatively generous tax credit and its rescission of revenue-generation will lead the bill as a whole to have a positive impact on the deficit. Further provisions:

    - Repeal several taxes used to pay for tanning, health insurer, Medicare investment, HSA, medical device, and Medicare taxes, in addition to the “Cadillac tax” on expensive insurance plans.
    - Repeal Obamacare’s excessive remuneration rule for insurers, meaning insurance providers can deduct payments to physicians and other qualified individuals in excess of $500,000.
    - Repeal the small-employer insurance tax credit.

    The American Health Care Act would change federal funding in some other places too.

    The newly proposed act would increase annual contribution limits for health savings accounts for people with high-deductible health insurance plans, which also reduces people’s taxable income and the revenues for the federal government. On the other side of the revenue coin, the bill would cancel unobligated funding for the Prevention and Public Health Fund after 2018. That fund allows the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to supplement lagging public-health funding and respond to public-health crises via a wide range of mechanisms, including block grants to states. That fund also covers the CDC’s childhood lead prevention program.

    The bill would also establish a “Patient and State Stability Fund” to provide states with grants to pursue certain innovations to reduce the cost and risks of health-care, including things like creating high-risk pools, providing preventative care, and establishing state-based cost-sharing reductions.

    In all, the American Health Care Act is roughly a repeal of the Obamacare mandates, a steep rollback of current and future federal commitments to covering people via Medicaid, a replacement of the existing tax credit with one that’s less generous for low-income people but still applies to middle-class people, and a repeal of most of the revenue-generating taxes of the ACA. At first glance, it appears that the most likely result nationally would be a net loss of coverage and a decrease in insurance affordability for many people who are the most vulnerable, but at least some of that effect might be offset by some enhanced state Medicaid payment capabilities and the stability fund. For now, it’s on to markup and the CBO.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics...and-no/518772/

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    Congressman Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) appeared on CNN’s New Day Tuesday morning to defend the Republican replacement for Obamacare that was rolled out to the public yesterday.

    The proposal has already faced heat from Democratic and non-partisan organizations who claim it will lead to a growth in the U.S. uninsured population.

    Congressman Chaffetz said the Republican plan would require Americans to make their own health choices, a situation he explained in the following way:

    Americans have choices and they’ve got to make a choice and so maybe rather than getting that new iPhone that they just love and they want to go spend hundreds of dollars on that, maybe they should invest it in their own healthcare. They’ve got to make those decisions themselves.

    “So in other words, for lower income Americans, you’re saying this is going to require some sacrifice on their part?” asked show co-anchor Alisyn Camerota.

    “We’ve got to be able to lower the cost of healthcare,” said Chaffetz, pivoting.

    When pressed again by Camerota, Chaffetz finally admitted that the Republican plan would likely result in less coverage.

    “Yes, I think that’s fair.”

    http://www.mediaite.com/tv/gop-congr...at-new-iphone/

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    Before the ACA, half of the 40 million uninsured either already qualified for state Medicaid or could afford insurance but were young and spent it on other things.

    I have a friend who got a metal shaving in his eye when he didn't have insurance and was upset at the cost. This was early to mid-2000s. But he was a pack a day smoker and a weed smoker. Add to that his marijuana habit, and he could've afforded catastrophic insurance. Too many young, healthy people buy $100 jeans, get loaded, go to the movies, pay for a newer car, etc.

    But to say this isn't Obamacare light is wrong. They're moving subsidies around and changing how the mandate works. Ultimately they haven't addressed the actual cost of health care.


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    I'm not against it, but I'm not impressed either. This is the trouble with trying to replace an entitlement that is already woven into the fabric of America. The minute you want to roll something back because it's unaffordable and doesn't really work, people freak out because they hear that someone is trying to take something away from them. Immediately human instinct kicks in and everyone screams "that's MINE!"

    As a result they have to come up with a plan that doesn't exactly repeal it but doesn't exactly keep it either and hope that people are okay with it.
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

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    RINO-Care: A more insolvent version of Obamacare … except this time GOP owns it

    The first thing to understand about the GOP healthcare bill is that it is not merely Obamacare-lite or a bad “replacement” bill. It doesn’t repeal the core of Obamacare in the first place. In fact, the few parts that it repeals or tweaks within a few years will actually intensify the death spiral of Obamacare when mixed with the core regulatory structure, exacerbated by the subsidies that they do keep. And this time, the GOP will own it politically. All of it.

    The most dangerous myth about the GOP plan is that it repeals Obamacare. At least if GOP leadership would be honest and say they are too scared to repeal the ACA and are just tweaking it a few years from now (after the death spiral is made worse), then we can blame the Democrats for voting for it. Now that a bill codifying Obamacare in the worst possible form is being sold as “repeal and replace,” Republicans have bailed out Democrats from their most toxic political issue without securing a single concession.

    Regulations, spending, mandates, subsidies, and taxes

    The basic structure of this plan is what I outlined last week after the first draft was leaked to the media. There is no discussion of lowering prices, fostering a revolution of choice, competition, portability, cost-consciousness, or breaking down the barriers between consumer and provider. That is because most of the regulatory structure and the exchanges are left in place.

    There is no innovation, and no way to lower costs. While some of the regulations are tweaked with more flexibility, the 800-pound gorilla in the room — guaranteed issue mixed with community rating (which is responsible for almost all of the premium hikes) — is left in place. Nor does this bill repeal the mandated essential benefits, which require insurers to cover a specific number of people and sex change operations, maternity care for men, etc.

    And even the repeal of actuarial value “metal” requirements (platinum, gold, silver, bronze) — the most positive of the outlined changes — would not take place until the 2020 plans.

    Amazingly, while the “American Health Care Act” blows up the insurance market in order to mandate coverage of the sick, it still throws a whopping $100 billion at states in order to further subsidies to the poor and the sick (on top of Medicaid expansion and exchange subsidies).

    Furthermore, the existence of the exchanges and the subsidies being steered to those exchanges will force insurers to continue competing for government-run health care that is actuarially insolvent. This continued structure will ensure that startup companies — which lack economies of scale to operate within this rigid (albeit slightly relaxed) structure — cannot enter the market. That is the core of what ails the health care industry.

    On top of leaving the regulatory regime and the rigid exchanges, this House bill replaces the income-based subsidies with age-based subsidies – ranging from $2,000 for younger people to $4,000 a year for older enrollees, and as much as $14,000 for a family. It is a massive new entitlement for middle-income and lower-income Americans. It would apply in full for families earning up to $150,000, and then phased out $100 per thousand dollars earned over that threshold. Thus, a family could theoretically get some sort of subsidy well into the $200,000-plus income level.

    As for Medicaid, the draft plan grandfathers in the entirety of the Obamacare expansion. Worse, it doesn’t freeze future enrollment for another two years, which will incentivize states to massively expand Medicaid before 2020. It also throws another $10 billion to states that never expanded Medicaid.

    Between the regulatory structure, subsidies, and Medicaid expansion, this bill is Obamacare. Literally.

    But, in fact, the GOP bill is actually worse than Obamacare for two reasons: 1) It will exacerbate the death spiral of fiscal insolvency; and 2) It will destroy the employer market.

    The one part of the bill that does actually immediately repeal an Obamacare provision is the immediate elimination of the individual mandate and the employer mandate that requires individuals to purchase and employers to provide health insurance.

    By leaving the price-hiking regulatory and subsidy structure in place, yet repealing the individual mandate, this bill will exacerbate the death spiral because people like myself — who are getting crushed with ridiculous premiums — will dump their insurance. Likewise, employers who are now forced to provide insurance will quickly dump their employees from their plans.

    This is what happens when Republicans focus on coverage numbers at the expense of lowering costs through the regulatory structure. They achieve neither. While the individual mandate is replaced with a provision mandating that insurance companies charge individuals who dropped their insurance an extra 30 percent when reenrolling, that provision doesn’t take effect until 2019. The adverse selection and death spiral will be terminal by then ; the employer mandate is not replaced at all.

    Also, the 40 percent Cadillac tax on more expensive health plans is delayed from 2020 until 2025, but not repealed.

    Thus, House Republicans have replaced the notorious taxes, regulations, subsidies, and mandates of Obamacare with … taxes, regulations, subsidies, and mandates. Except, this time, Republicans will own it. And that is exactly what the lobbyists for the status quo wanted.

    Now that Republicans will have their reputation tethered to Obamacare, they will be forced to consistently continue the hospital bailout program, otherwise known as Medicaid expansion. They will constantly be forced to re-up the individual and corporate cost-sharing subsidies to make up the gap from getting rid of the employer and individual mandates.

    This is not a half a loaf, it’s a poisonous loaf

    House leadership will tell its members, “Look, this isn’t perfect, but isn’t it better to take a half a loaf than no loaf at all?” In reality, this is a poisonous loaf. Again: It doesn’t repeal Obamacare, will exacerbate the death spiral, dump people off employer-based insurance, and force Republicans to own it this time.

    Yes, this is one of the rare instances when it’s better to do nothing if they don’t want to do the right thing. There is no upside for a conservative to sign onto this, and only downside. Also, remember that the Senate GOP is even more liberal than the House GOP, so this is the opening bid that will invariably get worse.

    Big picture: The result of this bill is that insurance companies will continue to look to government to regulate and subsidize. Thus, insurers will continue to run health care based on government and lobbyists to keep the gravy train rolling, and box out competitors instead of being forced to compete directly with new insurers for consumer business.

    Under the guise of promoting expanded coverage rather than decreasing costs, this plan will exacerbate both. Well done, Republicans.

    If nothing else, this is a vindication of those who warned during the primaries that Republicans were lying to us all along.

    It’s time for President Trump to lead, or this is over.

    https://www.conservativereview.com/c...me-gop-owns-it

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    Would really love to believe everything this guys says. We know how that will go.


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    The Conservative Uprising Against the Republican Health-Care Bill

    The new GOP proposal drew immediate criticism from lawmakers who argued it doesn’t go far enough in erasing the Affordable Care Act.



    House Republicans leaders on Monday embraced a legislative plan to replace the Affordable Care Act for the first time in the nearly seven years since Democrats enacted the transformative health-insurance law.

    Now, they have to sell it.

    That challenge ran into an immediate threat from key conservatives who criticized the new proposal for failing to fulfill the party’s iron-clad promise to rip out the signature policy of former President Barack Obama. “It’s Obamacare in a different format,” Representative Jim Jordan of Ohio, a member of the hardline House Freedom Caucus, said in a phone interview. Jordan cited three provisions that conservatives have complained about for weeks leading up to the formal release of the House GOP plan on Monday evening: its extension of Obamacare Medicaid expansion for another four years; its failure to immediately repeal all of the law’s tax increases; and its call to provide refundable tax credits to help people buy insurance, which Jordan labeled “a new entitlement.”

    Earlier on Monday, another member of the Freedom Caucus, Representative Justin Amash of Michigan, condemned the leadership bill in a two-word tweet: “Obamacare 2.0.” The full Freedom Caucus comprises about three dozen members of the 237 in the House Republican majority. If they voted as a bloc, they could sink the bill on their own. A spokeswoman for its chairman, Representative Mark Meadows of North Carolina, said members were still reviewing the legislation on Monday evening, and Jordan said the group planned to meet on Tuesday to discuss it.

    Representative Mark Walker of North Carolina, the leader of a far larger coalition of House conservatives, the Republican Study Committee, praised the new bill for moving in “the right direction” after he criticized an earlier draft. But he stopped well short of an endorsement. “We are carefully reviewing this legislation looking in three main areas of shared conservative concern: protection of the unborn, elimination of Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion and ensuring the tax credits are fiscally responsible,” Walker said.

    The reaction from conservative advocacy groups was no more favorable to the Republican leadership. FreedomWorks labeled the plan’s requirement that people pay a 30 percent premium to insurers if they stop their coverage for more than two months “the Republican individual mandate.” The Koch Brothers-backed Americans for Prosperity urged the leadership to “go back to the drawing board” a day before it released their bill.

    And on Tuesday morning, two more staunchly conservative activist organizations, Heritage Action and the Club for Growth, came out against the proposal. “Many Americans seeking health insurance on the individual market will notice no significant difference between the Affordable Care Act (i.e., Obamacare) and the American Health Care Act,” the group’s president, Michael Needham said. “That is bad politics and, more importantly, bad policy. Rather than accept the flawed premises of Obamacare, congressional Republicans should fully repeal the failed law and begin a genuine effort to deliver on longstanding campaign promises that create a free market health-care system that empowers patients and doctors.” The Club for Growth pejoratively dubbed the new bill “RyanCare” and added a new threat, vowing to downgrade any Republican who votes for the bill in the group’s closely-watched annual congressional scorecard.

    Monday’s release of the legislation follows weeks of negotiations among Republican lawmakers and senior Trump administration officials. President Trump gave the bill a boost on Twitter, but the White House notably declined to explicitly endorse it. “Today marks an important step toward restoring health-care choices and affordability back to the American people,” Press Secretary Sean Spicer said. “President Trump looks forward to working with both chambers of Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare.” The president leaned in a bit more enthusiastically on Tuesday morning: “Our wonderful new healthcare bill is now out for review and negotiation,” he tweeted.

    Yet what at least one conservative, Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, seized on was not Trump’s praise of the proposal but his suggestion that it was up for negotiation. “It won’t work,” Paul said Tuesday morning on Fox and Friends, continuing a crusade against the bill before it came out. Calling the legislation “Obamacare Lite,” the former presidential contender said its replacement of the individual mandate with a premium payment to insurers a “bailout for the insurance companies” that was unconstitutional. “I think it’ll be a real mistake to go for this,” Paul said. “It won’t pass, and conservatives won’t take it.”

    House leaders may need the president to make an aggressive push for the legislation for it to have a chance at passage. Trump plans to meet on Tuesday with the party’s team of vote-counters—a signal that he may engage in the legislative process more directly than he has so far. And the administration issued a letter of endorsement from Tom Price, the secretary of health and human services, and dispatched Mick Mulvaney, the budget director, to talk up the proposal on television. Both Price and Mulvaney are former congressmen who remain close with conservatives in the House, and the White House is banking on their ability to sell the plan to skeptical lawmakers. Yet despite their backing, the House Freedom Caucus, along with Paul and Senator Mike Lee of Utah, announced they would hold a press conference Tuesday afternoon, where they are expected to criticize the bill and call for a vote on a clean repeal of Obamacare.

    Two House committees announced plans to mark up and vote on the bill on Wednesday, less than 48 hours after its introduction and, in all likelihood, before the Congressional Budget Office has a chance to fully review it and project its impact on the deficit and the number of Americans who will gain or lose health insurance.

    As expected, Democrats immediately assailed the GOP bill as a plan that would strip insurance from people who gained coverage under Obamacare, cut taxes for the wealthy, and reduce funding for Medicaid. “This Republican bill will do massive damage to millions of families across the nation,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said. “Republicans have decided that affordable health care should be the privilege of the wealthy, not the right of every family in America.”

    House Speaker Paul Ryan has told Republicans he wants to pass the health-care bill within three weeks, but whether it ever makes it to a floor vote is an open question. The House effort nearly suffered a mortal blow hours before the plan was unveiled, when four Republican senators—Rob Portman of Ohio, Cory Gardner of Colorado, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska—warned that the emerging proposal would strip insurance from millions of their constituents who gained coverage through the Medicaid expansion. “The February 10th draft proposal from the House does not meet the test of stability for individuals currently enrolled in the program,” the senators wrote in a letter to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, “and we will not support a plan that does not include stability for Medicaid expansion populations or flexibility for states.”

    Republicans have just a 52–48 majority in the Senate, so the loss of four votes would doom any legislation. Paul appears to be a hard “no” on the bill, and several other senators have voiced concerns. Capito told Bloomberg News on Monday night that the new House bill was “moving in the right direction” on Medicaid, indicating that her vote was not lost.

    GOP leaders can find a narrow path to passage if enough of their members simultaneously accept legislation that falls short of full repeal while embracing the argument that more consumer choices, lower taxes, and less government involvement is worth the tradeoff of covering fewer people. If the initial reactions are any indication, however, that middle ground may not be large enough to hold a congressional majority.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics...cement/518775/

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    Sen. Rand Paul, House Freedom Caucus File Conservative Obamacare Replacement Bill After Meeting Veep Mike Pence

    7 Mar 2017



    Members of the House Freedom Caucus stood with Sen. Rand Paul (R.-Ky.) Tuesday to denounce the Obamacare replacement bill supported by House Speaker Paul Ryan (R.-Wis.) and to announce the filing of Paul’s own bill, which is sponsored in the House by Rep. Jim Jordan (R.-Ohio).
    “There is one thing that has united Republicans in 2010, when we won the House; in 2014, when we won the Senate; and 2016 when we won the White House,” said Paul, who was flanked by members of the House Freedom Caucus, including the caucus chairman Rep. Mark Meadows (R.-N.C.) and Jordan, the previous HFC chairman.



    A clean repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), like the bill that every House and Senate Republican voted for in 2015, should not divide Republicans, he said.

    Jordan said in order to bring down costs and improve medical care, Congress must repeal Obamacare completely. The Ohio congressman said the first step is to vote on the 2015 bill.

    Paul, who was a practising eye surgeon before his 2010 election to Congress, said in 2017 Republicans are united supporting complete repeal, but they are divided on how, if at all, to replace the 2010 PPACA. “Conservatives have a replacement plan. House leadership has a replacement plan,” he said. “Vote on all the replacement plans and let’s see what happens.”

    Jordan said the plan supported by Ryan and the House Republican leadership is Obamacare in a different form.

    “Then, there is our plan,” he said. “It is the one that I think is consistent with what we told the voters we’re going to do: Repeal Obamacare and replace it with a market-centered, patient-centered, and doctor-centered plan that actually brings down the cost of insurance.”

    In 2015, Republicans put a bill on President Barack Obama’s desk that repealed Obamacare, got rid of every single tax, and got rid of the mandate, Jordan said. Obama vetoed that bill, which was sponsored by then-Rep. Tom Price (R.-Ga.) — now the Secretary of Health and Human Services.



    Compare what happened in 2015 with the course that Ryan and the Republican leadership have set out on, Jordan said.

    “Now, the first thing that Republicans are bringing forward is a piece of legislation that we are going to put on a Republican president’s desk, that doesn’t repeal it, but keeps Medicaid expansion–and actually expands it–that keeps some of the tax increases. That is not what we promised the American people we would do.”

    Meadows said repealing Obamacare meant repealing all of Obamacare, all of the fees, taxes, and mandates. All Obamacare replacement bills will be subject to scoring by the Congressional Budget Office. “But there is one score that the American people will pay attention to: Does it really lower their health care costs and their premiums? That’s the only score that really matters and if this doesn’t do it, we better find something that does,” according to Meadows.

    Paul told reporters that in the House the score that counts is 218 votes.

    If the GOP leadership has 218 votes, then they will pass their bill and move on, he said.

    If the GOP leadership does not have 218 votes, then they have to find the votes and they will have to talk to conservatives, the senator said.

    Vice President Mike Pence added to the day’s drama when he met with members of the House Freedom Caucus after having his regular Tuesday lunch with GOP senators.

    Virginia Republican Rep. David Brat told Breitbart News the meeting with Pence was very direct and focused because both Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, who was traveling with Pence, are men of the House.

    Brat said he told Price that he needs to convince people on the Hill that regulations on insurance companies will be adjusted to make sense.

    Case in point, the congresman said: it is not legal for a 25-year-old male to buy a cheap insurance plan that only covers catastrophic illness and injury. “Right now, that kid has to buy a gold-plated that covers every health scenario under the sun.”

    The White House put out a statement about the meeting:


    The Vice President today met with conservative leaders in the House to discuss the failures of Obamacare and the need to repeal and replace that disastrous law. Participants discussed their shared desire for fiscally responsible, market-based reforms that encourage competition and provide individuals and families with the ability to choose the health insurance option that is best for them. The Vice President stressed this is the first step in the process to deliver on the President’s promise to the American people and looks forward to House passage of the American Health Care Act.

    The American Health Care Act is the name of the bill supported by House GOP leadership



    http://www.breitbart.com/big-governm...ep-mike-pence/
     "He has a swaggering retro machismo that will give hives to the Steinem cabal" -Camille Paglia on Donald Trump

    "But, fucking with Brook is like fucking with hot shit on and ax handle. You just don't get a grip"-track5

    "Make way for the bad guy"- Tony Montana

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    "My beef is people thinking Bon Jovi is good cuz they sold lots of records to housewives." -tango

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    Fuck, I give up. If anyone actually decides to move the conversation over here... blow me.

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    Not sure how Trump can say with a straight face that this is a large enough departure from the "awful" ACA to be meaningful.


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