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  1. #1
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    Default Americans Prefer Low Prices To Items "Made in the USA"

    The vast majority of Americans say they prefer lower prices instead of paying a premium for items labeled "Made in the USA," even if it means those cheaper items are made abroad, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll.

    While presidential candidates like Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders are vowing to bring back millions of American jobs lost to China and other foreign competitors, public sentiment reflects core challenges confronting the U.S. economy. Incomes have barely improved, forcing many households to look for the most convenient bargains instead of goods made in America.

    Employers now seek workers with college degrees, leaving those with only a high school degree who once would have held assembly lines jobs in the lurch. And some Americans who work at companies with clients worldwide see themselves as part of a global market.

    Nearly three in four say they would like to buy goods manufactured inside the United States, but those items are often too costly or difficult to find, according to the survey released Thursday.

    A mere 9 percent say they only buy American.

    Asked about a real world example of choosing between $50 pants made in another country or an $85 pair made in the United States - one retailer sells two such pairs made with the same fabric and design - 67 percent say they'd buy the cheaper pair. Only 30 percent would pony up for the more expensive American-made one. People in higher earning households earning more than $100,000 a year are no less likely than lower-income Americans to say they'd go for the lower price.

    "Low prices are a positive for US consumers - it stretches budgets and allows people to save for their retirements, if they're wise, with dollars that would otherwise be spent on day-to-day living," said Sonya Grob, 57, a middle school secretary from Norman, Oklahoma who described herself as a "liberal Democrat."

    But Trump and Sanders have galvanized many voters by attacking recent trade deals.

    From their perspective, layoffs and shuttered factories have erased the benefits to the economy from reduced consumer prices.

    "We're getting ripped off on trade by everyone," said Trump, the Republican front-runner, at a Monday speech in Albany, New York. "Jobs are going down the drain, folks."

    The real estate mogul and reality television star has threatened to shred the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada. He has also threatened to slap sharp tariffs on China in hopes of erasing the overall $540 billion trade deficit.

    Economists doubt that Trump could deliver on his promises to create the first trade surplus since 1975. Many see the backlash against trade as frustration with a broader economy coping with sluggish income gains.

    "The reaction to trade is less about trade and more about the decline in people's ability to achieve the American Dream," said Caroline Freund, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. "It's a lot easier to blame the foreigner than other forces that are affecting stagnant wage growth like technology."

    But Trump's message appeals to Merry Post, 58, of Paris, Texas where the empty factories are daily reminders of what was lost. Sixty-eight percent of people with a favorable opinion of Trump said that free trade agreements decreased the number of jobs available to Americans.

    "In our area down here in Texas, there used to be sewing factories and a lot of cotton gins," Post said. "I've watched them all shut down as things went to China, Mexico and the Philippines. All my friends had to take early retirements or walk away."

    Sanders, the Vermont senator battling for the Democratic nomination, has pledged to end the exodus of jobs overseas.

    "I will stop it by renegotiating all of the trade agreements that we have," Sanders told the New York Daily News editorial board earlier this month, saying that the wages paid to foreigner workers and environmental standards would be part of any deal he would strike.

    Still, voters are divided as to whether free trade agreements hurt job creation and incomes.

    Americans are slightly more likely to say free trade agreements are positive for the economy overall than negative, 33 percent to 27 percent. But 37 percent say the deals make no difference. Republicans (35 percent) are more likely than Democrats (22 percent) to say free trade agreements are bad for the economy.

    On jobs, 46 percent say the agreements decrease jobs for American workers, while 11 percent say they improve employment opportunities and 40 percent that they make no difference. Pessimism was especially pronounced among the 18 percent of respondents with a family member or friend whose job was offshored. Sixty-four percent of this group said free trade had decreased the availability of jobs.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/poll-ame...de-in-the-usa/

  2. #2
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    Most people can't afford to pay 70% more for items because of where they are made.

    Sent from my Z10 using Tapatalk

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    Shouldn't be a surprise. Walmart wouldn't be what it is if people cared about buying American. But buying American also isn't good for all Americans. It hurts some.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemachine97(Version 2) View Post
    Shouldn't be a surprise. Walmart wouldn't be what it is if people cared about buying American. But buying American also isn't good for all Americans. It hurts some.
    So when Trump says that he is going to bring jobs back to America - does that mean it will be for items Americans can't afford? If you want cheap - it can't be "Made In America"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Motherload View Post
    So when Trump says that he is going to bring jobs back to America - does that mean it will be for items Americans can't afford? If you want cheap - it can't be "Made In America"?
    This is one of those things that we have debated about from different sides. I prefer people be less hypocritical; you say the status quo isn't going to change, so I should deal with it.

    I think this is a classic example of Americans thinking something sounds really, really good. And in some ways it can be, while in other ways it can't be.

    But ultimately, at the end of the day, people are much more likely to buy the $50 pants than the $85 pants, even if the biggest difference is the "Made in the USA" label.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemachine97(Version 2) View Post
    This is one of those things that we have debated about from different sides. I prefer people be less hypocritical; you say the status quo isn't going to change, so I should deal with it.

    I think this is a classic example of Americans thinking something sounds really, really good. And in some ways it can be, while in other ways it can't be.

    But ultimately, at the end of the day, people are much more likely to buy the $50 pants than the $85 pants, even if the biggest difference is the "Made in the USA" label.
    So essentially - they prefer cheaper pants over making America great again.

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    It's a classic example of something sounding good, yet people don't do it when it comes to their wallets, and they don't really understand both the seen and unseen.

    Paying $85 for those USA jeans versus $50 for overseas jeans may make you feel good and it may be good for those who work for the company that manufactures the jeans and the American company that sold them. But it isn't good for the American business that won't see the $35 you would have otherwise spent there if you had bought the $50 jeans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemachine97(Version 2) View Post
    It's a classic example of something sounding good, yet people don't do it when it comes to their wallets, and they don't really understand both the seen and unseen.

    Paying $85 for those USA jeans versus $50 for overseas jeans may make you feel good and it may be good for those who work for the company that manufactures the jeans and the American company that sold them. But it isn't good for the American business that won't see the $35 you would have otherwise spent there if you had bought the $50 jeans.
    But will they actually need to charge $80 bucks for jeans to make any sort of profit or is there a little greed mixed in there and the prices are marked up needlessly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Motherload View Post
    But will they actually need to charge $80 bucks for jeans to make any sort of profit or is there a little greed mixed in there and the prices are marked up needlessly.
    I want to say that I remember a news story that was done years ago about Bernie Sanders being pissed that there wasn't enough made in America product at gift shops at things like the Smithsonian and Ford's Theater (where Lincoln was shot). A reporter went to a like gift shop and there was a made in USA hat ($20) and made in China hate ($11). So the gap here isn't something out of the ordinary.

    To your question, if a company believes that there is a prestige to a "made in America" label, absolutely I am guessing they price the hat higher than 'necessary' because people will pay it. But I don't find that any different than Apple selling their products at a premium because of the prestige associated with their brand. There are countless examples. It isn't just a "made in America" issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemachine97(Version 2) View Post
    I want to say that I remember a news story that was done years ago about Bernie Sanders being pissed that there wasn't enough made in America product at gift shops at things like the Smithsonian and Ford's Theater (where Lincoln was shot). A reporter went to a like gift shop and there was a made in USA hat ($20) and made in China hate ($11). So the gap here isn't something out of the ordinary.

    To your question, if a company believes that there is a prestige to a "made in America" label, absolutely I am guessing they price the hat higher than 'necessary' because people will pay it. But I don't find that any different than Apple selling their products at a premium because of the prestige associated with their brand. There are countless examples. It isn't just a "made in America" issue.
    Sure, but when polls come out like this one where Americans would rather have cheap cargo pants over a great America again - maybe companies should consider that, unless they are an American company that doesn't care to make made in America products.

    By the way, how are you as a consumer. Do you actually look at the back of products to see where it was made and proudly buy American or does a cheap cost or better quality than American made mean more to you.

    I know some Americans for example that say America makes shitty cars and they would never buy one - but I also know Americans that are all about American cars and a Ford Mustang or F150 makes them blow a load.
    Last edited by Motherload; 04.26.16 at 11:29 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Motherload View Post
    Sure, but when polls come out like this one where Americans would rather have cheap cargo pants over a great America again - maybe companies should consider that, unless they are an American company that doesn't care to make made in America products.
    But does it make America great again? If buying only "made in USA" makes America great, shouldn't buying only "made in California" make California great? Couldn't I make my city greater by buying things only made in my city?
    Last edited by lovemachine97(Version 2); 04.26.16 at 11:30 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemachine97(Version 2) View Post
    But does it make America great again? If buying only made in USA makes America great, shouldn't buying California only make California great? Couldn't I make my city greater by buying things only made in my city?
    Well the idea is that instead of people in China making those products - there would be new jobs for Americans - like a shoe factory for Nike, since Americans love to make shoes.

    By the way, how are you as a consumer. Do you actually look at the back of products to see where it was made and proudly buy American or does a cheap cost or better quality than American made mean more to you.

    I know some Americans for example that say America makes shitty cars and they would never buy one - but I also know Americans that are all about American cars and a Ford Mustang or F150 makes them blow a load.
    Last edited by Motherload; 04.26.16 at 11:36 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Motherload View Post
    Well the idea is that instead of people in China making those products - there would be new jobs for Americans - like a shoe factory for Nike.

    By the way, how are you as a consumer. Do you actually look at the back of products to see where it was made and proudly buy American or does a cheap cost or better quality than American made mean more to you.

    I know some Americans for example that say America makes shitty cars and they would never buy one - but I also know Americans that are all about American cars and a Ford Mustang or F150 makes them blow a load.
    Sure, but if I own a local restaurant, doesn't it matter to me more if local people have more and better jobs than someone in Alabama?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemachine97(Version 2) View Post
    Sure, but if I own a local restaurant, doesn't it matter to me more if local people have more and better jobs than someone in Alabama?
    Well I suspect when people say let's make America great again per Trump, they see it an overall let's all work together to make America great again. Every man for himself probably isn't a good campaign slogan.

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    Making "America great again"..to me, means putting our interests ahead of the world's interests.

    Now that sounds arrogant but it's mainly self-preservation. For too long we've neglected our own country in favor of this ideal of "globalism".

    We agree to shitty trade deals. We turn a blind eye to our Southern border. We've outsourced jobs to 3rd World countries and list goes on and on.

    Making America great, means telling China and others "here are our terms...don't like it...trade with someone else". The bully pulpit. Do we even exert that anymore?

    It's time to look out for ourselves for a change. How about that EU? Do they give a shit about America? Nope. How about the UN? Do they give a shit about America? Nope.

    Let's look inward. The time has come at least for the short term. Get our house in order.

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