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  1. #1
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    Default Missing Teens' Boat Found Capsized Off Florida Coast

    The two teens lost at sea off the coast of Florida could likely survive about 4 or 5 days in the water in current conditions, a Coast Guard official said today.

    U.S. Coast Guard press release
    who went missing on a fishing trip in Florida.
    The water where Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen, both 14, went missing is relatively warm, Coast Guard Captain Mark Fedor said at a press conference today, but he added that the environment is still dangerous.

    Fedor estimated that Austin and Perry -- who were last seen Friday and whose boat was found abandoned Sunday -- could likely survive about 4 or 5 days at sea based in part on survivability charts. He would not elaborate.

    Fedor told ABC News the Coast Guard hopes the boys may be hanging onto a lifejacket or a cooler, which was apparently on board.

    On Sunday, the teens' boat was found capsized and damaged off the coast of the Ponce de Leon Inlet in central Florida, the Coast Guard said, noting that neither boy was in or around the boat.

    It's still unclear why the boat capsized, Fedor said today.

    Fedor said, while rescuers were disappointed they didn't find the boys clinging to the boat, having the vessel validates the Coast Guard's search strategy that they're looking in the right area.

    The Coast Guard's search is now focused north of where the boat was found, Fedor said, and the search will continue overnight. By midnight tonight, over 27,000 square miles will be covered in the search, Fedor said -- equivalent to the size of West Virginia.
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    Gird your loins Daisy Hill's Avatar
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    I was following this....seems like they were experienced and level headed kids, but they're still kids and that's a big ocean. I hope the family gets news soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daisy Hill View Post
    I was following this....seems like they were experienced and level headed kids, but they're still kids and that's a big ocean. I hope the family gets news soon.
    Just finished arguing with a co-worker on this, those kids were too young and the ocean doesn't mess around. Permission should not have been granted.
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    Marine experts say missing Fla. teenagers should not have been alone offshore



    When news broke over the weekend that two 14-year-old boys had gone missing off the coast of Florida in a fishing boat, many parents raised a painful, yet inevitable, question: Why were the teenagers, Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen, allowed to take a 19-foot, single-engine boat onto the Atlantic Ocean without adult supervision in the first place?

    Addressing that question Tuesday on NBC’s “Today” show, their mothers told Savannah Guthrie that the boys were more than capable.

    “Austin has been on the water since before he could walk,” said Austin’s mother, Carly Black. “This is his fourth boat. This isn’t new to them. These boys have been doing this…it’s not even second nature at this point. It’s in their blood…they’re out there.”

    Perry’s mother, Pamela Cohen, told NBC: “We live in a boating community. These children are surrounded by water from the moment that they’re born. Perry knew how to swim before he knew how to walk.”

    After concentrating their search for the boys about 70 miles off the coast of Jacksonville on Monday, the U.S. Coast Guard expanded its search Tuesday to an area the size of West Virginia, reaching as far north as Savannah, Georgia, and as far south as Cape Canaveral, according to the Associated Press. The Navy has also joined the rescue effort, adding the USS Carney to the Coast Guard search team that has covered more than 28,000 square miles by air and by sea.

    The two boys were reported missing from Jupiter, Fla., on Friday afternoon. They were last seen purchasing $110 worth of gas for their boat on Friday; the capsized boat was found Sunday morning off the coast of Ponce Inlet, more than 180 miles north of where the teens started their journey.

    The search has continued day and night, with no sign of the boys.

    The search has taken on extra urgency after the Coast Guard located the boat they had been piloting; the capsized vessel was discovered Sunday about 67 nautical miles off Ponce de Leon Inlet in Volusia County, but there was no sign of Austin or Perry, both 14, in or around the boat.

    The boys were believed to be heading in the direction of the Bahamas, but their mothers disputed that idea during their appearance Tuesday on NBC. Black said the families, who live across the street from each other, believe the boys were fishing offshore when the weather turned bad and “something went amiss.”

    As the search continues, a debate over parenting and marine safety has been raging on Facebook and Twitter (and in the comments online), in which two camps have emerged: Those who believe the case of the missing boys is emblematic of reckless parenting, and those who have boating backgrounds and believe that the teenagers’ disappearance has nothing to do with their age.

    “My 15 year old has been boating alone and with buddies since he was 12,” Dawn Quarles argued on Facebook. ” He is trained, certified, and has thousands of hours logged on the water. This is an accident that could have easily happened to adults. Engine trouble happens to everyone. No need to judge these parents, you don’t know them or their kids.”

    Perry’s stepfather, Nick Korniloff, echoed those sentiments during an interview with CNN on Monday, when he called the two missing boys “survivors” and said the two families are “people of the water” who taught their kids “the respect of mother nature” and “the power of the sea.”

    Korniloff told the AP that the boys “were more passionate about the sea than anything else. If you put two pretty girls in front of them and two fishing rods, they’d grab the fishing rods first.”

    “Anybody who wants to judge and look back and ask why these boys went out there, they can do that,” Korniloff told CNN. “We know who our children are, and people who live on the water know what the water is all about and how we raise our kids.”

    Cohen added that when 14-year-old boys decide to do something when nobody is watching, there’s little parents can do.

    “We can’t keep them under our eye every moment of every day,” she said on CNN. “We raised them right and hopefully they will make the right decisions, and I do believe that they have the knowledge and the strength to get them through this.”

    According to USA Today, Korniloff told reporters on Sunday that the boys were not allowed to take the boat offshore or to the Bahamas.

    Mario Vittone, a marine safety expert who spent 22 years in the Coast Guard as a rescue swimmer and boating accident investigator, understands why.

    He said teenagers can spend years on the water and still be emotionally and mentally unprepared to deal with emergency situations. Asked whether teenagers should be allowed to go boating offshore without supervision, he said parents should consider the question very carefully.

    “I would rephrase the question,” he told The Post on Monday. “They should ask: Should I send a teenager who has no experience with crisis out into the largest wilderness in the world, completely surrounded on all sides by something that will kill them if they get in it?

    “Then the answer becomes obvious: No.”

    Vittone, who grew up in Florida and spent his teenage years boating along the state’s Intracoastal Waterway, like Perry and Stephanos, said everything changes when people move offshore.

    “The whole Florida coast is full of kids boating on the Intracoastal Waterway and if they get in trouble there’ll be six other boaters passing by in a minute,” he said. “But offshore, you’re really alone out there. There’s no safety anymore, and it’s up to you, and communication is up to you.”

    Coast Guard Petty Officer Mark Barney told The Post that the agency doesn’t have age recommendations for boaters, but encourages all boaters to take a boating safety course, which the boys completed.

    Their families reported there were life jackets on their boat, but Barney noted that Coast Guard and Navy rescuers don’t believe the boat was equipped with a radio. The Coast Guard, Barney said, never received a distress call from the vessel.

    Complicating matters, he said, was a series of powerful thunderstorms up and down the coast Friday.

    “It’s a warning call for everyone else unfortunately for what could happen to you,” he said. “These kids fished a lot, and they were out in the water a lot, but at the same time they were still 14 years old, and they were out there alone.”

    Derrick Fries, a marine expert and author of “Start Sailing Right,” told The Post that he won’t allow his own children to navigate a boat until they have a driver’s license. Even then, Fries said, the kids remain under strict supervision.

    Over time, he said a parent’s goal should be to increase their child’s problem-solving skills on the water.

    “You need to know what to do when the engine stops,” he said, noting that it’s not uncommon for inexperienced boaters to make the mistake of attempting to swim to shore during an emergency. “What are your alternatives. and how do you keep the boat in the water when there are waves?”

    “There is a lot of stuff that can go wrong in a hurry,” he said. “The more time you’ve spent on the water, the more you learn and become experienced at handling situations in a safe way.”

    Rick Spilman, a marine expert from Florida who founded the popular sailing forum known as the Old Salt Blog, told The Post that he saw himself in the two missing teens. He was 15 when he got his first boat and didn’t hesitate to journey far off the Gulf Coast for fun, even during bad weather. Thinking back on his adventures, to an age when he considered himself invincible, makes Spilman shudder decades later.

    Spilman said the question of whether to let teenagers take a boat out on their own is a tough call for parents, he said.

    Ideally, parents might limit younger boaters to an inlet or waterway where they could see land on both sides, a place where they can flag down other boats during an emergency. However, he noted, it’s easy to envision a scenario in which a pair of teenagers decide to push past their parents’ boundaries, turning an ordinary outing into a life-threatening situation.

    “The water is a very dangerous place that can seem very safe,” he said. “You can see the shore, it’s beautiful, you can get caught up in the color of the water and the dolphins and the birds, and you feel so much a part of all of it. If you get caught up in the wonder, you forget this place can also kill you.”

    On Monday, Perry Cohen’s mother, Pamela, said she was still optimistic that her son and his friend would be rescued.

    “None of us are giving up hope they’re going to find those boys,” Cohen she told CNN. “Obviously, it’s a terrifying experience to be living through.”

    She added: “I don’t know what happened; none of us know what happened. If we did, we’d have them in our arms right now.”

    This post, originally published on July 27, has been updated.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/m...lone-offshore/

  5. #5
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    Default WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Jul 29, 2015, 1:27 PM ET

    Coast Guard Official: Search for Teens Is 'Active and Open'

    Coast Guard and state officials visited the Florida home of one of two missing teenage boaters Wednesday, and a spokesman told news reporters the search for the boys is still "active and open."

    Capt. Mark Fedor of the Coast Guard said, "There's been a lot of rumors that the search has been suspected. I just want to refute that. The search has not been suspended."

    The Coast Guard and Florida Fish and Wildlife officers were at the home of 14-year-old Perry Cohen for almost an hour Wednesday afternoon.

    As they left, Fedor offered no further comment and didn't take questions.

    Earlier, a U.S. official in Washington had said the Coast Guard was suspending the search.

    Crews have been searching for Cohen and Austin Stephanos for six days.

    The teen's capsized boat was found Sunday, and the Coast Guard said it was searching the waters from Daytona Beach, Florida, north to South Carolina.

    The Coast Guard's relentless hunt for the 14-year-old fishermen had entered its sixth day with questions growing over how long it could go on. Decision-makers were juggling a mix of "art and science," Chief Petty Officer Ryan Doss said, trying to balance the knowledge of how long people can survive adrift with the unknowns on whether the boys had flotation devices and drinking water and what their physical condition is.

    "We know it can happen," Doss said of finding the boys alive, "and we're hoping it happens again."

    Laurence Gonzales, the author of "Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why," said the general rule of thumb is humans can stay alive three minutes without air, three days without water and three weeks without food but examples of defying that abound. The longest someone has been known to survive in the open ocean without water was about five days, he said, but the unknowns about the teens mean anything is possible.

    "People will constantly surprise you," said Gonzales, an author of four books on survival whose own father was a World War II pilot who survived being shot down. "You'll think, 'Surely this guy is dead.' And you'll go out and there he will be alive."

    Dr. Claude Piantadosi, a Duke University medical professor who authored "The Biology of Human Survival: Life and Death in Extreme Environments," said "the odds are against" the boys, but the search should continue. He wondered if they could be clinging to a cooler believed to have been aboard the boat and maybe used it to catch rainwater. Even so, the former Naval officer and avid boater and diver knows they are fast reaching the edge of survivability.

    "Every hour that passes at this point," he said, "the chances go down."

    Still, the search continued.

    Five hundred feet above the Atlantic on Tuesday, an eight-person Coast Guard crew aboard a C-130 plane flew in a grid pattern to survey the ocean below. Two men flopped on their bellies on a cargo ramp, scouring the waters below, while other crew members searched from the windows or used a joystick to manipulate a camera scanning murky seas. Occasionally, they spotted something and looped around, sometimes dropping flares.

    A white rectangular shape that looked like a pillow. A box. Something greenish. But none of the items turned out to be worthwhile clues.

    "Frustrating," one crew member remarked on their headset.

    "Very," said another.

    http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/c...ching-32750720

  6. #6
    Baluchitherium
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    C'mon God, let something awesome happen and these kids get found alive.
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    Default TEQUESTA, Fla. — Jul 29, 2015, 8:09 PM ET

    Teens' 6 Days Adrift Verge on Limits for Survival at Sea

    Crews pushed the limits of an ever-expanding search zone Wednesday for two teens missing at sea and potentially nearing the boundaries of human survival.

    The Coast Guard's relentless hunt for the 14-year-old fishermen, Perry Cohen and Austin Stephanos, persisted for a sixth day as questions grew about how long it could go. Decision-makers were juggling a mix of "art and science," Chief Petty Officer Ryan Doss said, trying to balance the knowledge of how long people can survive adrift with the unknowns on whether the boys had flotation devices and drinking water and what their physical condition is.

    Still, authorities insisted their search would continue throughout the day.

    "There's been a lot of rumors that the search has been suspended. I just want to refute that," Capt. Mark Fedor said, speaking on the street where both boys live. "The search has not been suspended. It is still active and open."

    Earlier Wednesday, a U.S. official in Washington had said the Coast Guard was suspending the search.

    Fedor was part of a Coast Guard contingent that met with the boys' families for an hour Wednesday afternoon. Afterward, he declined to elaborate on the search or to answer reporters' questions, but even a day earlier he acknowledged that with each passing hour, the prospects were direr.

    The saga of the two boys from Tequesta, Florida, began Friday. Their parents believed their fishing outing would take them to a local river and waterway, as was the rule in previous solo trips, not the deep waters of the Atlantic. A line of summer storms moved through the area that afternoon, and when the teens didn't return on time, the Coast Guard was alerted and began their day-and-night search.

    The Coast Guard has covered a mammoth search area stretching nearly 40,000 square nautical miles, from the waters off South Florida up through South Carolina. It has proven a frustrating ordeal, with no new clues since the teens' capsized boat was located Sunday. Sightings of floating objects occasionally spurred hope before being found irrelevant.

    Dr. Claude Piantadosi, a Duke University medical professor who authored "The Biology of Human Survival: Life and Death in Extreme Environments," said finding individuals outside of a boat, simply bobbing in the water, is intensely difficult. The former Navy officer said sailors lost at sea might run an orange streamer 30 to 40 feet behind them to aid being located by air.

    "Single people in the ocean are the hardest to pick up," he said.

    Piantadosi, an avid boater and diver, has frequently visited the Atlantic waters where the teens disappeared, and says they are remarkably empty expanses, largely free of anything the boys might be able to grab unto.

    "There's just not that much debris out there," he said. "Occasionally you'll find a log or buoy, something like that drifting along, but not very often."

    But the lengthening interval since the boys disappeared does not dispel all hope for them.

    In 2005, two South Carolina teens were swept out to sea on their small sailboat during a storm. After searching for them for several days, the Coast Guard and state officials began referring to their effort as a recovery operation instead of a rescue.

    Yet the teens were found alive after almost a week at sea. A key difference from the Florida teens, though: They were still aboard their boat.

    Each year, Florida waters swallow a small number of boaters who venture out and never return. In 2013, when Florida had 56 boating fatalities, it also had nine missing boaters who were never found and are presumed dead, according to the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Last year, there were 64 fatalities and six missing boaters.

    The commission could not break down how many of these accidents happened in the ocean, the Gulf of Mexico or on a lake or river.

    Dr. Raj Dasgupta, a critical care doctor at the University of Southern California, said the boys' experience in the open water may be far different from what some might expect.

    "They're usually not going to be found eaten by sharks like some movies would have you believe. They're going to have fatigue and muscle cramps and dehydration," he said. "It's the worst oxymoron in the world: You're surrounded by water and there's no water."

    http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/c...ching-32750720

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    Old news story of teens being rescued from sea being confused for current situation

    Who knows someone on facebook that posted this old story from 2005 yesterday without checking the details first?

  9. #9
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    Default WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Jul 30, 2015, 6:22 PM ET

    Rescuers Hope for 'Best-Case Scenario' for Boys Lost at Sea

    Mustering hope for a "best-case scenario" in the face of countless unknowns, search crews braced for a seventh day and night at sea Thursday in the hunt for two teenagers missing from their capsized boat.

    Five things to know about air-and-sea search for 14-year-old friends Perry Cohen and Austin Stephanos, who went missing last Friday off Florida's Atlantic coast:

    ———

    THEY COULD BE ALIVE:

    The Coast Guard, which is leading the rescue mission, says it wouldn't continue searching if it didn't believe the boys could still be alive. Much remains unknown, including whether the teens are wearing life jackets, might have a cooler or some other object to cling to, or have drinking water or food. Chief Petty Officer Ryan Doss said its decision errs on the side of the "best-case scenario" while balancing the limits on human survival.

    ———

    THE SEARCH CONTINUES:

    The Coast Guard says it plans for its search crews to remain out throughout Thursday overnight into Friday, with the area of focus stretching from the waters off Daytona Beach, Florida, through Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. Officials have not yet said whether it will continue beyond that. The decision will be based on whether clues surface, marine and weather conditions and, most importantly, whether they believe the boys could still be alive. The Coast Guard doesn't mobilize to retrieve bodies, so if their hope is totally lost, a search is suspended. "At the end of the day, it's all based on the possibility of survival," Doss said.

    ———

    INITIAL REPORT:

    The Jupiter Police Department released the 911 call placed by Perry's stepfather Nick Korniloff, who reported the boys missing at 4:23 p.m. Friday, triggering the Coast Guard's search. In a calm voice, Korniloff said the 14-year-old boys hadn't been heard from since about 11:30 a.m. and said calls to a cellphone went unanswered. "Usually he checks in and he's told to check in on a regular basis," the stepfather said. The dispatcher replied, "And you know we had a storm before, too?" Korniloff said the boys went offshore, outside the bounds of their expected trip, though it's not clear how he knows this. "We had no idea they were going offshore," he said.

    ———

    PRIVATE EFFORTS:

    Even as the Coast Guard's intense hunt has covered nearly 44,000 square nautical miles, and other agencies have helped, the families of the boys have organized their own search and are prepared to keep it going if the teens aren't found before formal efforts end. The family said about 20 private pilots were flying out of Savannah, Georgia, and Charleston, South Carolina, on Thursday, in addition to numerous boaters, all attempting to cover areas not already in the Coast Guard's search zone. Matt Kuntz, an uncle of Austin, said those private efforts would continue even if the Coast Guard's search ends. "We will continue looking every day," he said.

    ———

    INTEREST FROM AFAR:

    More than 140,000 people have joined the "Find Austin & Perry" group on Facebook group and Twitter analytics site Topsy counted more than 40,000 tweets with the hashtag FindAustinAndPerry in the past week. Followers of the story are among those who pumped about $250,000 into a GoFundMe account to finance private search efforts. Kristen Mackey, a mother of two in Greenville, South Carolina, has been following the developments from afar and posting on Facebook about the boys. "The thought of two young boys lost at sea really pulled at my heart," she said, adding that she has faith their survival skills have helped them stay alive. "Miracles do happen," she said.


    Coast Guard Will Search All Night for Missing Florida Teens

    The boys' mothers said Thursday that Austin and Perry are experienced boaters, and are resourceful enough to survive at sea.

    "I think they've made a raft, between the cooler and the life jackets and whatever else they can find floating," said Carly Black, Austin's mother.

    "My husband keeps saying that he thinks one of them made a spear pole and they're out there eating sushi. These boys are like mini-MacGyvers," she said, referring to the inventive television character.

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    Hoping for the best but after a week, it doesn't look good.
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    Default 8:45 a.m. EDT July 31, 2015

    Were teens missing off Florida's coast too young to sail? Boating experts discuss

    Two Florida teens missing at sea have local experts at odds over how young is too young to safely pilot a boat.

    Some wonder how and why the 14-year-old Tequesta boys — Perry Cohen and Austin Stephanos — were boating alone, supposedly heading to a regular fishing spot within the Loxahatchee River and the Intracoastal Waterway.

    Their capsized boat, a 19-foot, single-engine vessel was found Sunday off Ponce de Leon Inlet south of Daytona more than 180 miles northeast from where they were last seen. The Gulf Stream probably carried the boat to that location.

    “Why would a couple 14-year-olds be going offshore in such a small boat by themselves? That was my first thought,” said Capt. Jay McMillin, co-owner of TowBoatU.S. in Cape Coral.

    He said the nearly $110 of fuel they had wouldn’t have taken them as far as where the boat was found.

    McMillin said waters off Jupiter can get wicked during storms, so boaters need to check the weather for not only when they are leaving but also for while they will be on the water.

    “They’re youngsters, so they’re not going to do that,” he said. “It’s tragic that they went out. I think they did what young boys do.”

    Bob Wasno, a licensed boat captain who operates all of FGCU’s Vester Marine Field Station research vessels, said conditions can worsen in a hurry on the water.

    “Two 14-year-old kids should remain in the backwater and never, ever, ever go out the pass,” he said. “Maybe they had a Superman, bravado, nothing-can-hurt-me thing going, but, by no means, should two young boys be out in the ocean in that vessel on a good day, much less what they were getting into.”

    Mike Burby said it isn’t that simple.

    “You can have all the experience in the world, don’t matter,” said Burby, operations director and powerboat instructor at Edison Sailing Center in Fort Myers.

    Burby has 14-year-olds teaching other children boating skills because they can relate to them more easily.

    Cohen and Stephanos have taken boating safety courses, said Ashley Johnson, U.S. Coast Guard petty officer 3rd class.

    The U.S. Coast Guard is searching the waters off Florida's east coast for two missing 14-year-olds who disappeared while fishing in the Atlantic Ocean. Their boat was found, capsized. AP

    Florida requires minors to take the course in order operate a boat of 10 horsepower or greater but does not issue licenses.

    All boaters born after 1988 who Burby trains must have at least a Boater Education Identification Card, which requires passing a test from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators. The minimum age to get the card, known as a bobber card, is 11 years old.

    Once they have the certification, Burby has trusted boaters as young as 11 to man the helm during 120-mile trips to the Dry Tortugas.

    He said he’s resisted making a snap-judgment of the missing teens because he didn’t train them.

    “They’re Florida boys, so they must have known the weather,” he said.

    Although he could “spin 1,001” theories about what happened to the missing boys, Burby said it’s of no use.

    “You’re not there, so you don’t know,” he said.

    Burby said he always tells his students to keep calm if they find themselves in a bind.

    “Nothing’s worth your life. It’s just a boat,” he said. “Boats handle weather better than people do.”

    That’s why he also tells people to stick to their vessel if they’re thrown from it.

    “If it’s afloat, stay with the boat,” he said. “You’re just an ant (to rescuers.)”

    The U.S. Coast Guard has scoured nearly 40,000 square nautical miles, stretching from the waters off Jupiter up through South Carolina.

    Burby said the most important thing is to teach children respect for the water and proper technique when they’re young, as they are the future of the seas.

    Motioning to the water, he said: “We want the kids to enjoy what’s here.”

    http://www.news-press.com/story/news...esta/30900537/

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    As a long time boater on big water my opinion is that 14 yr olds with no adult experienced mariner in a 19 ft boat offshore is a disaster waiting to happen. It's like a loaded gun in your house with kids same thing. As a father I would have never let this occur. Respect for the water and knowing your vessels limits are paramount.
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    Default Jul 31, 2015, 12:10 PM ET

    Coast Guard Will Suspend Search Tonight for Teens Missing at Sea, But Families Vow to Push On

    The Coast Guard tonight is expected to suspend their search for two Florida teenagers who've been missing at sea for one week, but the boys' families vow to push on with their bid to find them.

    The search for Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen, both 14, will be suspended at sunset tonight, Capt. Mark Fedor, of the Coast Guard's 7th District in Miami, said at a news conference today.

    The search, which spanned 8 days and 50,000 nautical miles, remains active and open today, Fedor said.

    Fedor said the suspension means if new information comes to light, they will reopen the case.

    Florida Teens Missing at Sea Could Likely Survive 4 to 5 Days, Coast Guard Says

    Florida Teens Missing at Sea: First Look at Capsized Boat

    Florida Teens Missing at Sea: What We Know About Their Survival Skills

    Perry and Austin's families said in a statement today that they are "committed to continue the search and rescue efforts of our boys with the aid of volunteer pilots and aircraft."

    They said they established a GoFundMe to raise money for private planes, boat fuel and other resources.

    "The case is not closed," the family said. "And if pertinent details emerge or credible information comes forward that we will have the assistance of the US Coast Guard to investigate this information."

    Fedor today offered his "heartfelt condolences" to Austin and Perry's families. He said he's met with them and that the decision to suspend the search was excruciating and gut-wrenching.

    Fedor said he hopes the families "can take solace from the fact that hundreds of people searched thousands of miles."

    Austin and Perry left on a fishing trip in Florida last Friday morning and they were reported missing Friday evening, authorities said.

    On Sunday, their boat was found capsized and damaged off the Ponce de Leon Inlet in central Florida, the Coast Guard said, noting that neither boy was in or around the boat.

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