Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Atomic Punk bklynboy68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Favorite VH Album

    The Magnificent 7
    Last Online

    10.27.16 @ 01:11 PM
    Liked 6,053 Times in 3,291 Posts

    Premium Member

    Default Supreme Court bans warrantless cell phone searches, updates privacy laws

    The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police cannot go snooping through people’s cell phones without a warrant, in a unanimous decision that amounts to a major statement in favor of privacy rights.

    Police agencies had argued that searching through the data on cell phones was no different than asking someone to turn out his pockets, but the justices rejected that, saying a cell phone is more fundamental.

    The ruling amounts to a 21st century update to legal understanding of privacy rights.

    “The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote for the unanimous court.

    “Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple— get a warrant.”

    Justices even said police cannot check a cellphone’s call log, saying even those contain more information that just phone numbers, and so perusing them is a violation of privacy that can only be justified with a warrant.

    The chief justice said cellphones are different not only because people can carry around so much more data — the equivalent of millions of pages of documents — that police would have access to, but that the data itself is qualitatively different than what someone might otherwise carry.

    He said it could lay bare someone’s entire personal history, from their medical records to their “specific movements down to the minute.”

    The chief justice cited court precedent that found a difference between asking someone to turn out his pockets versus “ransacking his house for everything which may incriminate him” — and the court found that a cellphone falls into that second category.

    Complicating matters further is the question of where the data is actually stored. The Obama administration and the state of California, both of which sought to justify cell phone searches, acknowledged that remotely stored data couldn’t be searched — but Chief Justice Roberts said with cloud computing, it’s now sometimes impossible to know the difference.

    The court did carve out exceptions for “exigencies” that arise, such as major security threats.

    Read more:

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a strong defense of digital age privacy, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police may not generally search the cellphones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants.
    Cellphones are powerful devices unlike anything else police may find on someone they arrest, Chief Justice John Roberts said for the court. Because the phones contain so much information, police must get a warrant before looking through them, Roberts said.

    "Modern cellphones are not just another technological convenience. With all they contain and all they may reveal, they hold for many Americans the privacies of life," Roberts said.

    The court chose not to extend earlier rulings that allow police to empty a suspect's pockets and examine whatever they find to ensure officers' safety and prevent the destruction of evidence.

    The Obama administration and the state of California, defending the cellphone searches, said cellphones should have no greater protection from a search than anything else police find.

    But the defendants in these cases, backed by civil libertarians, librarians and news media groups, argued that cellphones, especially smartphones, are increasingly powerful computers that can store troves of sensitive personal information.

    In the cases decided Wednesday, one defendant carried a smartphone, while the other carried an older flip phone.

    Roberts said the comparison to packages of cigarettes and other items that were at issue in the earlier cases is not apt.

    A ride on horseback and a flight to the moon both "are ways of getting from point A to point B, but little else justifies lumping them together," he said.

    Authorities concerned about the destruction of evidence can take steps to prevent the remote erasure of a phone's contents or the activation of encryption, Roberts said.

    One exception to the warrant requirement left open by the decision is a case in which officers reasonably fear for their safety or the lives of others.

    The two cases arose following arrests in San Diego and Boston.

    In San Diego, police found indications of gang membership when they looked through defendant David Leon Riley's Samsung smartphone. Prosecutors used video and photographs found on the smartphone to persuade a jury to convict Riley of attempted murder and other charges. California courts rejected Riley's efforts to throw out the evidence and upheld the convictions.

    The court ordered the California Supreme Court to take a new look at Riley's case.

    In Boston, a federal appeals court ruled that police must have a warrant before searching arrestees' cellphones.

    Police arrested Brima Wurie on suspicion of selling crack cocaine, checked the call log on his flip phone and used that information to determine where he lived. When they searched Wurie's home and had a warrant, they found crack, marijuana, a gun and ammunition. The evidence was enough to produce a conviction and a prison term of more than 20 years.

    The appeals court ruled for Wurie, but left in place a drug conviction for selling cocaine near a school that did not depend on the tainted evidence. That conviction also carried a 20-year sentence. The administration appealed the court ruling because it wants to preserve the warrantless searches following arrest.

    The justices upheld that ruling.
     "He has a swaggering retro machismo that will give hives to the Steinem cabal" -Camille Paglia on Donald Trump

    "Make way for the bad guy"- Tony Montana

    'This hamburger don't need no helper"- David Lee Roth

    "I wish Bon Jovi would've given me a call before he recorded all of his hits, because the lyrics would've been smarter, the melodies would've been much more smashing, and they would've sold a lot fewer records." -David Lee Roth

    "My beef is people thinking Bon Jovi is good cuz they sold lots of records to housewives." -tango

    "But being number one doesn’t really mean jack fuck all. We sold twice as many records as other records that year (1984) that landed in the Number One position." ~Eddie Van Halen

  2. #2
    Atomic Punk
    Join Date
    somewhere over the rainbow
    Last Online

    10.27.16 @ 10:14 AM
    Liked 779 Times in 312 Posts


    finally some sanity.... for now...
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton



Similar Threads

  1. Supreme Court rules against affirmative action
    By Jesus H Christ in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 04.28.14, 02:52 PM
  2. Obama administration asks Supreme Court to allow warrantless cellphone searches
    By voivod in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08.20.13, 03:56 AM
  3. Here we go.... Supreme Court considering to ban handguns...
    By voivod in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10.01.09, 12:09 PM
  4. Mobile Phone Tracker (cell phone)...
    By muffdiver in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04.02.07, 02:04 PM
  5. Supreme Court OKs Random Drug Tests in Schools
    By Pasadena Murdock in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 06.29.02, 11:30 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts