Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube
Register
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 73
  1. #1
    ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Number 47's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.08.06
    Posts
    29,833
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 03:50 PM
    Likes
    1,881
    Liked 6,841 Times in 3,580 Posts


    Premium Member

    The Tonight Show Staring Jimmy Fallon

    'The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon' premiere review: No one is more excited than Jimmy

    Everything had to go wrong for Jimmy Fallon to get The Tonight Show. NBC had to choose Leno over Letterman, and then choose Leno again over O’Brien: A pair of historic injustices, if you’re the kind of person who treats millionaire-white-dude desk-swapping like generation-defining culture-quakes. There’s a school of thinking that Letterman and O’Brien “deserved” The Tonight Show — not to mention two decades of jokes about how Leno didn’t deserve it. But deserve’s got nothing to do with it. The Tonight Show is a powerful concept — a way to talk about Hollywood or America or Comedy or Whatever Matters Now — but it’s also a straightforward piece of old-fashioned showbiz, a variety show airing five times a week on a network that needs to make money.

    Letterman and O’Brien always had a perspective on the late-night franchise that was simultaneously admirable and totally weird: They seemed to buy in completely to the grand idea of The Tonight Show, but also want more than anything to stamp themselves completely onto that grand idea. As related in Bill Carter’s The War for Late Night, O’Brien could have actually kept The Tonight Show but refused to move it back to midnight. Four years later, it’s hard to tell whether that exit was a brave blow struck in the eternal battle of Individual against Machine, or a defining moment in the history of Taking Things Too Seriously.

    What’s undeniable is that, in his final weeks, O’Brien created some of the finest hours in contemporary late-night history: Hilarious and bitter, whimsical and sad. He was an intense host — and still is on TBS, though his fire has been replaced either with contentment or regret. It’s clear to see now that he struggled in the early months of his Tonight Show: The move to L.A., the Jay Leno Show catastrophe, the sense that NBC maybe just thought he was too weird for 11:30. The fight with his own network gave him a mission statement. His final speech still hits you in the heart.

    Fallon referenced this troubled history a couple of times in his first opening monologue: “I’m Jimmy Fallon, and I’ll be your host for now,” and thanking the previous Tonight Show hosts in puckish chronological order, ”Steve Allen, Jack Paar, Johnny Carson, Jay Leno, Conan O’Brien, and Jay Leno.” He made the same jokes that headline writers made months ago, probably because he felt like he had to.

    But then he moved on. And unlike when O’Brien started, Fallon right now is all mission statement. He moved The Tonight Show back to New York City. This simple change of location gives Fallon cool cred (opening credits by Spike Lee) but also legacy cred (he can talk a lot about Carson) while also helping NBC maintain the cultural conceit that 30 Rock is the center of the world. (All of Fallon’s monologue jokes were about the Olympics, currently airing on NBC; lest we miss the synergy, he played a clip from the Today show.) In the premiere’s showstopping moment, Fallon ascended to the Top of the Rock. U2 played one of their terrible new songs, and it was wonderful: Bono doing the Jesus pose, screaming “New York” while the Empire State Building shined red-white-and-blue in the background.

    Fallon is much younger than Leno and much less weird than O’Brien. Theoretically, this could lose him viewers in the long run — the young viewers stick with O’Brien and Colbert and Kimmel, the old people move on to Letterman or wait patiently for Leno or suddenly discover that cable got invented decades ago. But in this first show, you could marvel at how effectively Fallon and his team have attempted to triangulate themselves. Fallon’s new set is purposefully old-fashioned compared to the college-cafe-in-the-meatpacking-district where he lived on Late Night. But his bit about yearbook awards for Olympic athletes found time for a weed joke and a Saved by the Bell reference (“Lesbian Screech”), while mixing in rimshots about the Jonas Brothers and Justin Bieber.

    You got the clear sense that Fallon just wants everyone to play together. At one point, he turned to the camera and said, “To my buddy who said I’d never host The Tonight Show: You owe me 100 bucks.” The celebrity parade that followed was a canny mix: New York icons (De Niro, Giuliani, Broadway Joe, SJP), haterade-baiting tabloid icons (Kardashian, Lohan), NBC Super-Friends (Tina Fey, Tracy Morgan), legitimate superstars (Gaga, Rogen, Mariah Carey going full-pout), all of the above (Joan Rivers, Mike Tyson), and his time-slot rival Stephen Colbert, who got the loudest laugh of the night with the line “Welcome to 11:30, bitch!” But that was right after he took a selfie. Everyone’s a friend here.

    The viral bit — Fallon and first guest Will Smith doing “the evolution of hip-hop dancing” — was funny, and also a reminder that Fallon is one of the most natural physical performers to ever host a late-night show on a broadcast network. That was followed immediately by an actual interview with Will Smith — a reminder that Fallon is one of the least natural interviewers to ever host, etc., etc. Fallon is a nice guy. He’s a hugger. He gave Will Smith a hug and told him that he was great, and his family was great, and he asked Smith for advice on how to handle being great.

    People always bring up Fallon’s niceness when they compare him to other late-night hosts. On one hand, it’s a survival strategy. Celebrities have so many options for connecting to non-celebrity human beings now: More shows, more social media. Fallon wants people to come on his show and play. This means that his conversations can be shockingly dry — “I gotta congratulate you on raising the nicest girl ever!” — but they also reap big rewards when the celebrities start to play along. I glazed over for both segments of Smith’s interview, but the moment he stared at the camera with an intense curling face was worth it all.

    Likewise, the interview with U2 was well-nigh inscrutable — it was like everyone and yet no one was talking all at once. At one point, Fallon said: “If Bono can get up and talk, everyone knows it’s a great speech!” Grooooan. But then he asked Bono to do a speech about his coffee mug, and Bono played along:

    “I can only do a speech about things I believe in… but I believe in this cup. It’s not a cup, it’s a container. It demands to be filled, by our love or bad thoughts. This cup was held in the hand of Nelson Mandela.”

    Then Fallon asked U2 to perform acoustically for him. They played another one of their terrible new songs — the one that will probably win an Oscar — and it was just beautiful, and then midway through the song Bono turned to Fallon’s house band and said “Roots? Come on!” and then it was perfect.

    Even though Fallon is a big fan of The Tonight Show, you get the pleasant vibe that he is unencumbered by any extraneous anxiety of influence — that he has no soul-crushing concern that he will somehow fail to live up to some higher ideal of Carsonhood. “I wanna do the best I can and take care of this show for a while,” he said modestly in his prologue. “I read jokes off a cue card. My goal is to make you laugh and put a smile on your face.”

    It will be interesting to see over the months (and hopefully years) to follow how he evolves behind the desk. You hope that he can figure out how to conduct an interview without making half the questions a variation on “HOW DID YOU GET SO AWESOME?” Conversely, you wonder if he might just wind up replacing the interviews with viral-ready clips: More dance numbers, more nostalgia bait.

    But it could be that Fallon would prefer altogether not to do anything too bold with the format; that he sees himself as a proud curator, both of The Tonight Show‘s history and of a happy-place performance space where Will Smith can nod along at the end of the couch to a U2 acoustic performance. He’s confident; he’s casual; he’s well-adjusted; he’s got the Roots. “This is exciting!” he said at the start of the show, before helpfully reiterating, “I couldn’t be more excited.” Time-slot rival Jimmy Kimmel is the inheritor of the Letterman tradition: Too cool for school. Fallon is the guy who thinks school is pretty cool.

    Premiere Grade: B+

    http://popwatch.ew.com/2014/02/18/to...fallon-review/

  2. #2
    ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Number 47's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.08.06
    Posts
    29,833
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 03:50 PM
    Likes
    1,881
    Liked 6,841 Times in 3,580 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    Jimmy Fallon Debuts New ‘Tonight’ Show in New York

    What a nice young man.

    Jimmy Fallon, the new host of the “Tonight” show, introduced himself to viewers on Monday like a freshly licensed doctor taking over a retiring gerontologist’s practice.

    Mr. Fallon didn’t smirk or make sarcastic asides. He gently and earnestly explained that he is 39, lives in New York City, and has a wife and a new baby. He pointed out his parents in the studio audience and also how the monologue works. He choked up a little when talking about the “Tonight” show legacy. “I just want to do the best I can,” he said. “And take care of the show for a while.”

    Even with celebrity cameos (Tina Fey, Stephen Colbert, Robert De Niro, among many others) and high-profile guests like Will Smith and the band U2, Mr. Fallon’s debut was more sweet than sassy. He was the grateful heir, the eager freshman, the class clown with top grades and a good heart — someone older viewers can embrace without fear of being mocked or overlooked.

    And that was interesting, because the most fateful generational shift isn’t between baby boomers who were loyal to Jay Leno, the previous “Tonight” host, and younger viewers who are more comfortable with Mr. Fallon, a “Saturday Night Live” alumnus who incorporated tweets and Internet skits when he took over “Late Night” in 2009. Now it’s “Tonight” vs. tomorrow: this old-fashioned kind of programming is at the mercy of a changing landscape where audiences are balkanized and viewing habits are radically altered.

    The “Tonight” show is in good hands, but its longevity rests less on the host than on audiences who increasingly don’t turn on a television to watch television. Mr. Fallon intimated as much when he recalled begging his parents to let him stay up late to watch Johnny Carson. He got a little emotional when he added that he hoped there was “a kid out there asking their parents to stay up to watch me.”

    Maybe. But that kid can watch “Tonight” on his iPhone on the school bus the next day. And unlike Mr. Fallon, he isn’t likely to grow up aspiring to host the “Tonight” show anymore than he will get his news from a paper edition of The New York Times.

    Paradoxically, a format that hasn’t changed since Mr. Carson codified it (monologue, celebrity, musical guest), is ideally constituted for the cut-and-paste ethos of YouTube and Twitter. Far more than a drama or a reality show, a joke or musical number can be plucked and posted online as a stand-alone. There is no need to DVR anymore: why record the cow when the Internet and social media can give viewers the milk for free?

    And that sense of impending change tends to trigger the instinct to preserve, which may be why Mr. Fallon’s first “Tonight” show was so steeped in tradition and solemnity.

    After more than 40 years in Los Angeles, the show has moved back to New York, where it originated in 1954. Spike Lee was asked to film the show’s artsy opening credits. Even the title has reverted to the wording that Mr. Carson used. When Mr. Leno took over the show in 1992, he changed it to “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno.” Mr. Fallon is calling his “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.”

    The new set is more elegant than Mr. Leno’s, but also quite formal and a little impersonal: a slate blue couch, a handsome honey-colored wood desk and matching walls. The one feature that distinguishes it from a business center at a Four Seasons hotel is the backdrop – a New York skyline made of miniature wooden skyscrapers. (Mr. Fallon also had a four-leaf clover painted on the floor to mark his place for the monologue.)

    The changeover was commemorated with a visually stunning novelty: U2 performed a new song, “Invisible,” on the roof of Rockefeller Center, framed by the pink and gold of Manhattan’s skyline at sundown.

    Mr. Fallon delivered a fairly classic “Tonight” monologue with predictable jokes about the Olympics. He also introduced a staple of his “Late Night” repertoire, a dance number. He and Mr. Smith donned denim overalls and performed “The Evolution of Hip-Hop Dancing.”

    But throughout the show, Mr. Fallon made nice more than he made jokes. It was notable that when he brought up thank-you notes, he wasn’t introducing his popular letter-writing skit. Instead he congratulated Mr. Smith on the good manners of his daughter, Willow, 13, marveling that after he sang one of her songs a few years ago, Willow wrote him a polite thank-you letter on proper stationery.

    Mr. Fallon is a charming and gifted comedian who on his first night chose to be subdued and at times even serious. That said as much about the uncertain future of “Tonight” as it did about its new host.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/19/ar...york.html?_r=0

  3. #3
    ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Number 47's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.08.06
    Posts
    29,833
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 03:50 PM
    Likes
    1,881
    Liked 6,841 Times in 3,580 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    I never watched Fallon on Late Night so I don't know how this will compare to what he did there, but I enjoyed the first show last night.

    The move back to New York makes it all seem more like a fresh start then any of the previous "rebootings" have. The new set and band stand look great. Very understated but classy.

    U2 on the roof of 30 Rock at sunset was very cool and it looks like we will be seeing more bands up there in the future.

    Jimmy looks like he's going to handle this all pretty well. First impressions are the most important, and I've set my DVR based on his first outing last night.

  4. #4
    Atomic Punk edwardv's Avatar
    Join Date
    12.13.01
    Age
    59
    Location
    hanover pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,037
    Favorite VH Album

    diver down
    Favorite VH Song

    drop dead legs
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 05:41 PM
    Likes
    4,484
    Liked 2,386 Times in 1,488 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    RIP Johnny Carson
    EVH 1979: Well, actually it's not much of a vacation, because we run everything ourselves. We design our own album cover, we have to be in the office every day to sign checks - the whole corporation revolves around us. Nothing can be done without our approval. We even have photo approval.

  5. #5
    Atomic Punk jimmy812's Avatar
    Join Date
    06.03.04
    Age
    46
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,640
    Last Online

    06.03.17 @ 06:59 PM
    Likes
    1,188
    Liked 327 Times in 204 Posts

    Default

    He came off genuine enough. Understandably a little nervous, even though he's been doing this for a while now and it's only right down the hall from his Late Night studio.

    The Roots have more room to sprawl out, so they must enjoy that.

    I've seen his Late Night show a bunch of times, and this was, more or less, similar to that. He will still do little skits with the guests (that stupid history of hip-hop with Will Smith last night).

    I thought the new Tonight Show set was very plain and ordinary. His backdrop on Late Night was better, I thought.

    He'll do fine.
    2-time Fantasy Baseball Champion.

  6. #6
    Atomic Punk lovemachine97(Version 2)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    06.05.03
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    13,986
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 10:06 PM
    Likes
    815
    Liked 3,115 Times in 1,826 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    The way I understand it, around the time the announcement was made that he was taking over the show, a duplicate of the Late Night set was built down the hall. Late Night then moved to the duplicate set while the original Late Night set was torn down and the Tonight Show set was erected in the original studio. He finishd Late Night in the temporary studio, then moved back to his original studio and the new set for the Tonight Show.

    Anyway, I thought the new set was elegant without losing the charm of the show. Jay Leno's 10:00 set was pretty meh, and that's the set he used for the Tonight Show until he left.

    Fallon's decision to mix up the formula a tiny bit was interesting. One thing I learned from rereading The War For Late Night recently is that musical acts are the dirge of late night tv. Music is too polarizing nowadays for it to be reliable for ratings. Leno and his executive producer examined the ratings minute by minute and knew that the key was keeping viewers in "Act II," after the commercial that follows the monologue. (This is usually where a comedy bit like Headlines or Jaywalking went.) Then if you have a good first guest, you can keep the viewer, though the trend was for the viewers to drop out as the show went on.

    However, there was a cliff whenever the musical acts played.

    So I was surprised last night when Act II was not just a comedy bit, but also the musical performance.

    Thought the performance was really pretty on top of the building, though. And the performance at the end of the show was great too. The Roots took a backseat last night, which probably made sense. I think as people realize how good they are and how they work with him, they will really like the band.

    Last night was about introducing Fallon to a new group of viewers. He was himself, if a bit nervous. He came across as likeable and humble, and even a bit funny. I will continue to watch.

  7. #7
    Gird your loins Daisy Hill's Avatar
    Join Date
    04.17.08
    Age
    57
    Location
    Goose Poop, Ohio
    Posts
    13,063
    Favorite VH Album

    Fair Warning
    Favorite VH Song

    Panama
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 05:44 PM
    Likes
    1,811
    Liked 2,238 Times in 1,356 Posts

    Default

    I liked the set... warm and with interesting textures When they showed the entire set and part of the studio audience that was cool....lots or room allocated for the Roots The bit with the $100 payoff was cool.......wild to see Joan Rivers in the bunch...first time in 30 years, could have done without a kardashian tho

    I didn't like the opening.........if you want to see how to do that kind of address to the audience just right, revisist Conan's good bye speech...warm, with humility,humor and gratitude . The best work he did on the Tonight show ironically

    survivor of the Bowling Green Massacre 9-3-2016 BGSU 10 OSU 77

    She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.

  8. #8
    Atomic Punk lovemachine97(Version 2)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    06.05.03
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    13,986
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 10:06 PM
    Likes
    815
    Liked 3,115 Times in 1,826 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    The opening was a little rough. It seemed like they didn't know exactly which note to play, so they just went with letting Jimmy be nice.

    Conan's situation was so much different with so much emotion. Conan hosted Late Night for 17, 18 years. He turned down incredibly lucrative deals ($21M a year with Fox when he was making $3M a year) to stay the course. He negotiated a start date of June 2009 for the Tonight Show in 2004, so he had five years to dream about getting his dream job. In seven months, that was taken away.

    By contrast, Fallon couldn't have had any thoughts of ever getting the Tonight Show (much like Seth Meyers shouldn't, unless Fallon bombs and Meyers goes bananas). Conan got the show at 46. If you imagine he was going to do 20 years, Fallon would have been 55 by that time.

    Instead, because of yet another late night dust up, Fallon woke up one day in line for the throne, having only been on Late Night for five years. The future looks very bright for him.

    I guess what I am saying is that I don't think we could have expected the same sort of emotions piloting Fallon's words last night. Conan was in a unique position.

  9. #9
    ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Number 47's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.08.06
    Posts
    29,833
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 03:50 PM
    Likes
    1,881
    Liked 6,841 Times in 3,580 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    I thought the opening credits by Spike Lee were pretty weak and run of the mill. Plus you can barely hear the announcer over the crowd and theme. A minor complaint but it could be better... or will improve with time.

    Guess I'm just too much a fan of Craig Ferguson's theme which he wrote, produced and performed himself... plus the song sticks in your head the next day.

    ...it's OK! ...You can always sleep through work tomorrow!


  10. #10
    Atomic Punk Little Dreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    12.25.99
    Age
    45
    Location
    Pasadena, CA, USA
    Posts
    8,940
    Favorite VH Album

    Fair Warning
    Favorite VH Song

    Hear About It Later
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 01:39 PM
    Likes
    1,013
    Liked 1,387 Times in 761 Posts

    Default

    Jimmy's got the right attitude. All these commentators pretend very serious debate is going on during Late Night shows. It's all entertainment!
    Little Dreamer

  11. #11
    Forum Frontman Double Down's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.10.05
    Age
    49
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    17,911
    Favorite VH Album

    ('78-'84) VH 1; ('86-'95) 5150
    Favorite VH Song

    Dave- I'm The One ; Sam- 5150
    Last Online

    11.17.17 @ 12:11 PM
    Likes
    538
    Liked 1,033 Times in 543 Posts

    Default

    Literally have not watched the Tonight Show since Johnny Carson. Watched it religiously with him through the 80's. Never saw one full show with Leno in all those years and don't plan on starting with this tool.
    .
    .
    .
    VH with Dave ('78-'84) - The best years....the "real" VH.
    VH with Sam ('86-'96) - Incredible era....."We have renamed this town 'New Halen!'.
    VH with Gary ('98) - Fucking disaster. WTF was that??
    VH with Wolf/Dave ('12-'15) - Amazing comeback. Smokin' album and tours.

  12. #12
    Atomic Punk jimmy812's Avatar
    Join Date
    06.03.04
    Age
    46
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,640
    Last Online

    06.03.17 @ 06:59 PM
    Likes
    1,188
    Liked 327 Times in 204 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Double Down View Post
    Literally have not watched the Tonight Show since Johnny Carson. Watched it religiously with him through the 80's. Never saw one full show with Leno in all those years and don't plan on starting with this tool.
    Wow. Does he owe you money or something?

    It's funny; you don't know the guy, you've never seen his show, and you don't plan on it, yet you think he's a tool. Unless you're saying he's a tool because he's a Red Sox fan, then it's ok.
    2-time Fantasy Baseball Champion.

  13. #13
    Forum Frontman Double Down's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.10.05
    Age
    49
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    17,911
    Favorite VH Album

    ('78-'84) VH 1; ('86-'95) 5150
    Favorite VH Song

    Dave- I'm The One ; Sam- 5150
    Last Online

    11.17.17 @ 12:11 PM
    Likes
    538
    Liked 1,033 Times in 543 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy812 View Post
    It's funny; you don't know the guy, you've never seen his show, and you don't plan on it, yet you think he's a tool. Unless you're saying he's a tool because he's a Red Sox fan, then it's ok.
    I know who Fallon is.
    .
    .
    .
    VH with Dave ('78-'84) - The best years....the "real" VH.
    VH with Sam ('86-'96) - Incredible era....."We have renamed this town 'New Halen!'.
    VH with Gary ('98) - Fucking disaster. WTF was that??
    VH with Wolf/Dave ('12-'15) - Amazing comeback. Smokin' album and tours.

  14. #14
    Atomic Punk
    Join Date
    11.12.03
    Posts
    17,322
    Favorite VH Album

    1978-1996
    Favorite VH Song

    1978-1996
    Last Online

    12.23.16 @ 10:32 AM
    Likes
    4,364
    Liked 2,068 Times in 1,102 Posts


    Donor

    Default

    Didn't watch (Not that I would have, but I thought he wasn't starting until after the Olympics) but this was cool to read:

    Only a couple of jabs at NBC’s mishandling of the “Tonight” transition kept comedy in his opening segment. “I’m Jimmy Fallon, and I’ll be your host — for now,” he said, a nod to NBC giving “Tonight” to Conan O’Brien in 2009 and then taking it back the next year.

    Then, with a pointed list, he thanked the hosts who had come before him: “Steve Allen, Jack Paar, Johnny Carson, Jay Leno, Conan O’Brien and Jay Leno.”

    I thought Jimmy would be on his best behavior not to upset the Leno faithful and NBC. Fuck'em Nice jabs

  15. #15
    Forum Frontman It's Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    03.26.06
    Age
    43
    Location
    Vaughan, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    34,142
    Favorite VH Album

    like them all, no favourite
    Last Online

    12.14.17 @ 08:25 PM
    Likes
    1,316
    Liked 6,697 Times in 3,717 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greenpaw View Post
    Didn't watch (Not that I would have, but I thought he wasn't starting until after the Olympics) but this was cool to read:

    Only a couple of jabs at NBC’s mishandling of the “Tonight” transition kept comedy in his opening segment. “I’m Jimmy Fallon, and I’ll be your host — for now,” he said, a nod to NBC giving “Tonight” to Conan O’Brien in 2009 and then taking it back the next year.

    Then, with a pointed list, he thanked the hosts who had come before him: “Steve Allen, Jack Paar, Johnny Carson, Jay Leno, Conan O’Brien and Jay Leno.”

    I thought Jimmy would be on his best behavior not to upset the Leno faithful and NBC. Fuck'em Nice jabs
    I don't think fans of Jay would be upset with that (1) it was funny and (2) it's shots at NBC. Jay did it all at time, Dave does it with CBS, kind of standard stuff.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. CF to perform on The Tonight Show 3/1
    By At0micPunk in forum Chickenfoot
    Replies: 145
    Last Post: 03.19.12, 08:38 AM
  2. Joe on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon
    By killahound22 in forum Chickenfoot
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02.09.10, 09:33 PM
  3. Mos Def on Jimmy Fallon
    By VegasVic in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06.12.09, 07:10 PM
  4. VH1 Rock Show On Tonight?>
    By Mean_Street in forum Main VH Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01.06.02, 05:48 PM
  5. Abe's staring contest!
    By AbeVanHalen in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06.06.01, 01:45 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •