Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube
Register
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Atomic Punk Little Dreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    12.25.99
    Age
    45
    Location
    Pasadena, CA, USA
    Posts
    8,938
    Favorite VH Album

    Fair Warning
    Favorite VH Song

    Hear About It Later
    Last Online

    12.13.17 @ 10:58 PM
    Likes
    1,005
    Liked 1,385 Times in 760 Posts

    Chicago more dangerous than Iraq and Afghanistan combined

    Unbelievable! 113 people killed in Chicago in 2010 so far, more than the combined total of US deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan! They're about to call in the National Guard!!! Maybe our linkers living in the windy city can comment.

    From the Chicago Sun-Times:


    The National Guard can seem like the natural answer to any urban emergency.

    Flooding? Call in the Guard.

    Blizzard? Call in the Guard.

    Rioting? Call in the Guard.

    And Chicago certainly has what feels like an emergency. A surge in violence over the first three weeks of April has put the city on track to a yearly total of homicides not seen in a decade. The number of murders in the first three months of 2010 was up 7 percent over the same period last year.

    Should we call in the Guard, as two state lawmakers urged on Sunday, to fight violence on Chicago's streets?

    State Representatives John Fritchey and LaShawn Ford think so. They point out that the 113 homicides in Chicago as of the weekend matched U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq put together.

    It's time, they say. Call in the Guard.

    Fritchey and Ford deserve credit for calling attention to an urgent situation. But Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis was right, too, when he said the National Guard isn't the answer.

    In post-Katrina New Orleans, the Guard served a useful role staffing checkpoints to keep people out of sealed-off neighborhoods. That's a job a military force can do.

    But the Guard isn't suited to fight drug violence and gangs. Guard units are not trained to collect evidence, obtain search warrants or help build criminal cases that can stand up in court. And they know far less about our city neighborhoods than do the police who are there every day.

    Good police work is more than uniformed personnel stationed on the corners of dangerous neighborhoods. And it's certainly not military rifles and camouflage.

    The Chicago Police Department is 2,000 officers short of what the city budget authorizes. We need more cops, not more soldiers.

    This is easy to say for those of us who write from office buildings in the Loop or live in safer neighborhoods or suburbs. It is more difficult to accept for those who must fall to the floor at night when gunfire starts or for the family of a 20-month-old girl -- Cynia Cole -- killed by an errant bullet as she sat in the back seat of her family's car.

    But the problems are deep, and the solutions must run deeper.

    We have been calling for years for public policies that go to the root of the problem of wasted lives, poverty and violence. We have called for better schools, backing dramatic, even radical, efforts such as Renaissance 2020, where whole schools are shut down for failure and reorganized. We have called for fundamental shifts in emphasis in education, to include what is called "social and emotional learning."

    We have called for programs to treat young nonviolent offenders in their communities, rather than dispatch them off to prison, where they become hardened.

    We have called for reforms in our drug laws, especially the harsh penalties for marijuana that fuel violence by creating a black market.

    Others have correctly pointed out that public policy and schools can only do so much. The fate of our neighborhoods also comes down to personal responsibility -- how well families raise their children.

    This year's statistics are alarming -- homicides are up 67 percent in the Harrison Police District.

    But the numbers also show the police have been doing good work in many places. Murders have not increased in Austin, which adjoins the Harrison district, and are down 40 percent in Englewood. Overall, violent crime is down 35 percent in the city over the past 10 years.


    From the Chicago Sun-Times:


    Blizzard? Call in the Guard.

    Rioting? Call in the Guard.

    And Chicago certainly has what feels like an emergency. A surge in violence over the first three weeks of April has put the city on track to a yearly total of homicides not seen in a decade. The number of murders in the first three months of 2010 was up 7 percent over the same period last year.

    Should we call in the Guard, as two state lawmakers urged on Sunday, to fight violence on Chicago's streets?

    State Representatives John Fritchey and LaShawn Ford think so. They point out that the 113 homicides in Chicago as of the weekend matched U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq put together.

    It's time, they say. Call in the Guard.

    Fritchey and Ford deserve credit for calling attention to an urgent situation. But Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis was right, too, when he said the National Guard isn't the answer.

    In post-Katrina New Orleans, the Guard served a useful role staffing checkpoints to keep people out of sealed-off neighborhoods. That's a job a military force can do.

    But the Guard isn't suited to fight drug violence and gangs. Guard units are not trained to collect evidence, obtain search warrants or help build criminal cases that can stand up in court. And they know far less about our city neighborhoods than do the police who are there every day.

    Good police work is more than uniformed personnel stationed on the corners of dangerous neighborhoods. And it's certainly not military rifles and camouflage.

    The Chicago Police Department is 2,000 officers short of what the city budget authorizes. We need more cops, not more soldiers.

    This is easy to say for those of us who write from office buildings in the Loop or live in safer neighborhoods or suburbs. It is more difficult to accept for those who must fall to the floor at night when gunfire starts or for the family of a 20-month-old girl -- Cynia Cole -- killed by an errant bullet as she sat in the back seat of her family's car.

    But the problems are deep, and the solutions must run deeper.

    We have been calling for years for public policies that go to the root of the problem of wasted lives, poverty and violence. We have called for better schools, backing dramatic, even radical, efforts such as Renaissance 2020, where whole schools are shut down for failure and reorganized. We have called for fundamental shifts in emphasis in education, to include what is called "social and emotional learning."

    We have called for programs to treat young nonviolent offenders in their communities, rather than dispatch them off to prison, where they become hardened.

    We have called for reforms in our drug laws, especially the harsh penalties for marijuana that fuel violence by creating a black market.

    Others have correctly pointed out that public policy and schools can only do so much. The fate of our neighborhoods also comes down to personal responsibility -- how well families raise their children.

    This year's statistics are alarming -- homicides are up 67 percent in the Harrison Police District.

    But the numbers also show the police have been doing good work in many places. Murders have not increased in Austin, which adjoins the Harrison district, and are down 40 percent in Englewood. Overall, violent crime is down 35 percent in the city over the past 10 years.

    Can the National Guard really do a better job?

    Even if Guard units were called in, they would not stay for long. Chicago needs a permanent solution, one rooted in solving problems of poverty, poor schools and dysfunctional families.

    It's tempting to yearn for the hero with the tin star to come to town and drive out the violence.

    But that's not how the real world works.

    The solution is not in our tin stars, but in ourselves.
    Little Dreamer

  2. #2
    Unchained HailNgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    03.07.00
    Posts
    448
    Last Online

    05.01.12 @ 10:03 PM
    Likes
    0
    Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Yes, Chicago is very dangerous, but only in certain areas. We are so separated as a city. Meaning, you have not a lot of mixing of race. (With exception of Mexicans) If your not from Chicago, you may not understand, but we are not a diverse "mix"........What is bad is a lot of night clubs are located in bad parts of town. Its a big city, not just the little "mag " mile. Sorry, trying to post from my phone.....not working to well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Little Dreamer View Post
    Unbelievable! 113 people killed in Chicago in 2010 so far, more than the combined total of US deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan! They're about to call in the National Guard!!! Maybe our linkers living in the windy city can comment.

    From the Chicago Sun-Times:


    The National Guard can seem like the natural answer to any urban emergency.

    Flooding? Call in the Guard.

    Blizzard? Call in the Guard.

    Rioting? Call in the Guard.

    And Chicago certainly has what feels like an emergency. A surge in violence over the first three weeks of April has put the city on track to a yearly total of homicides not seen in a decade. The number of murders in the first three months of 2010 was up 7 percent over the same period last year.

    Should we call in the Guard, as two state lawmakers urged on Sunday, to fight violence on Chicago's streets?

    State Representatives John Fritchey and LaShawn Ford think so. They point out that the 113 homicides in Chicago as of the weekend matched U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq put together.

    It's time, they say. Call in the Guard.

    Fritchey and Ford deserve credit for calling attention to an urgent situation. But Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis was right, too, when he said the National Guard isn't the answer.

    In post-Katrina New Orleans, the Guard served a useful role staffing checkpoints to keep people out of sealed-off neighborhoods. That's a job a military force can do.

    But the Guard isn't suited to fight drug violence and gangs. Guard units are not trained to collect evidence, obtain search warrants or help build criminal cases that can stand up in court. And they know far less about our city neighborhoods than do the police who are there every day.

    Good police work is more than uniformed personnel stationed on the corners of dangerous neighborhoods. And it's certainly not military rifles and camouflage.

    The Chicago Police Department is 2,000 officers short of what the city budget authorizes. We need more cops, not more soldiers.

    This is easy to say for those of us who write from office buildings in the Loop or live in safer neighborhoods or suburbs. It is more difficult to accept for those who must fall to the floor at night when gunfire starts or for the family of a 20-month-old girl -- Cynia Cole -- killed by an errant bullet as she sat in the back seat of her family's car.

    But the problems are deep, and the solutions must run deeper.

    We have been calling for years for public policies that go to the root of the problem of wasted lives, poverty and violence. We have called for better schools, backing dramatic, even radical, efforts such as Renaissance 2020, where whole schools are shut down for failure and reorganized. We have called for fundamental shifts in emphasis in education, to include what is called "social and emotional learning."

    We have called for programs to treat young nonviolent offenders in their communities, rather than dispatch them off to prison, where they become hardened.

    We have called for reforms in our drug laws, especially the harsh penalties for marijuana that fuel violence by creating a black market.

    Others have correctly pointed out that public policy and schools can only do so much. The fate of our neighborhoods also comes down to personal responsibility -- how well families raise their children.

    This year's statistics are alarming -- homicides are up 67 percent in the Harrison Police District.

    But the numbers also show the police have been doing good work in many places. Murders have not increased in Austin, which adjoins the Harrison district, and are down 40 percent in Englewood. Overall, violent crime is down 35 percent in the city over the past 10 years.


    From the Chicago Sun-Times:


    Blizzard? Call in the Guard.

    Rioting? Call in the Guard.

    And Chicago certainly has what feels like an emergency. A surge in violence over the first three weeks of April has put the city on track to a yearly total of homicides not seen in a decade. The number of murders in the first three months of 2010 was up 7 percent over the same period last year.

    Should we call in the Guard, as two state lawmakers urged on Sunday, to fight violence on Chicago's streets?

    State Representatives John Fritchey and LaShawn Ford think so. They point out that the 113 homicides in Chicago as of the weekend matched U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq put together.

    It's time, they say. Call in the Guard.

    Fritchey and Ford deserve credit for calling attention to an urgent situation. But Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis was right, too, when he said the National Guard isn't the answer.

    In post-Katrina New Orleans, the Guard served a useful role staffing checkpoints to keep people out of sealed-off neighborhoods. That's a job a military force can do.

    But the Guard isn't suited to fight drug violence and gangs. Guard units are not trained to collect evidence, obtain search warrants or help build criminal cases that can stand up in court. And they know far less about our city neighborhoods than do the police who are there every day.

    Good police work is more than uniformed personnel stationed on the corners of dangerous neighborhoods. And it's certainly not military rifles and camouflage.

    The Chicago Police Department is 2,000 officers short of what the city budget authorizes. We need more cops, not more soldiers.

    This is easy to say for those of us who write from office buildings in the Loop or live in safer neighborhoods or suburbs. It is more difficult to accept for those who must fall to the floor at night when gunfire starts or for the family of a 20-month-old girl -- Cynia Cole -- killed by an errant bullet as she sat in the back seat of her family's car.

    But the problems are deep, and the solutions must run deeper.

    We have been calling for years for public policies that go to the root of the problem of wasted lives, poverty and violence. We have called for better schools, backing dramatic, even radical, efforts such as Renaissance 2020, where whole schools are shut down for failure and reorganized. We have called for fundamental shifts in emphasis in education, to include what is called "social and emotional learning."

    We have called for programs to treat young nonviolent offenders in their communities, rather than dispatch them off to prison, where they become hardened.

    We have called for reforms in our drug laws, especially the harsh penalties for marijuana that fuel violence by creating a black market.

    Others have correctly pointed out that public policy and schools can only do so much. The fate of our neighborhoods also comes down to personal responsibility -- how well families raise their children.

    This year's statistics are alarming -- homicides are up 67 percent in the Harrison Police District.

    But the numbers also show the police have been doing good work in many places. Murders have not increased in Austin, which adjoins the Harrison district, and are down 40 percent in Englewood. Overall, violent crime is down 35 percent in the city over the past 10 years.

    Can the National Guard really do a better job?

    Even if Guard units were called in, they would not stay for long. Chicago needs a permanent solution, one rooted in solving problems of poverty, poor schools and dysfunctional families.

    It's tempting to yearn for the hero with the tin star to come to town and drive out the violence.

    But that's not how the real world works.

    The solution is not in our tin stars, but in ourselves.
    Posted from mobile device.

  3. #3
    Eruption Naked Wake's Avatar
    Join Date
    01.26.09
    Location
    Oakland Ca
    Posts
    1,067
    Favorite VH Album

    Diver Down
    Favorite VH Song

    I'm the One
    Last Online

    12.11.17 @ 12:57 PM
    Likes
    89
    Liked 102 Times in 69 Posts

    Default

    I saw a documentary a few nights ago about Guatemala City. Population of about two million people and they're experiencing about five thousand murders per year. Because they've had a shift in government after years of oppression, the cops are basically powerless. They have to witness a murder before they can make an arrest. Not an eye witness, but the police have to witness it.

  4. #4
    Atomic Punk Wruff_ajax's Avatar
    Join Date
    03.15.03
    Location
    US of America
    Posts
    8,884
    Favorite VH Album

    =VH= II
    Last Online

    12.13.17 @ 02:56 PM
    Likes
    740
    Liked 788 Times in 378 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Dreamer View Post
    Unbelievable! 113 people killed in Chicago in 2010 so far, more than the combined total of US deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan! They're about to call in the National Guard!!!
    If Chicago's on it's way to becoming a police state then I guess we should just nuke Detroit and save ourselves some trouble. (JK Detroit!)

    Obama leaving a trail of devastation from Chicago to the White House though. And now he rules us all.

    Hopefully what they believe is necessary for Chicago doesn't become necessary for the country.



    In post-Katrina New Orleans, the Guard served a useful role staffing checkpoints to keep people out of sealed-off neighborhoods. That's a job a military force can do.

    But the Guard isn't suited to fight drug violence and gangs. Guard units are not trained to collect evidence, obtain search warrants or help build criminal cases that can stand up in court.


    The Chicago Police Department is 2,000 officers short of what the city budget authorizes. We need more cops, not more soldiers.

    But the problems are deep, and the solutions must run deeper.
    PMC's in the house, y'all!! Security contractors.

    Private Military Companies. Contract killers. Fighting under contract of the US Govt in Iraq and Afghanistan, and already patrolling streets in America.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_military_company
    _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_

  5. #5
    Atomic Punk
    Join Date
    06.15.06
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    13,741
    Favorite VH Album

    VHIII/WACF/OU51BALUCK
    Last Online

    07.24.11 @ 04:36 PM
    Likes
    0
    Liked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    interestingly enough, so much attention is placed on the border towns and the violence in Mexico yet it's far from the only place where violence is spiking, as this article shows. Guatemala is a war zone. Brazil has major major problems with murder. Then there's places throughout Africa, the middle east, places in Asia...but even closer to home Chicago, Detroit, hell Houston's southwest side is nowhere any of us would want to be hanging out in.
    Stay out of it, dude.


    I am Van Halen.

  6. #6
    Good Enough pal1800's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.30.07
    Age
    46
    Location
    Mandeville, LA
    Posts
    1,731
    Favorite VH Album

    Too hard to choose
    Favorite VH Song

    Too hard to choose
    Last Online

    06.02.16 @ 09:13 AM
    Likes
    0
    Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    The usual suspects, over and over again. Exactly why I was forced to leave New Orleans. Shit culture is like a cancer, it moves around where things were once nice and it kills everything.

  7. #7
    Atomic Punk
    Join Date
    06.15.06
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    13,741
    Favorite VH Album

    VHIII/WACF/OU51BALUCK
    Last Online

    07.24.11 @ 04:36 PM
    Likes
    0
    Liked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pal1800 View Post
    The usual suspects, over and over again. Exactly why I was forced to leave New Orleans. Shit culture is like a cancer, it moves around where things were once nice and it kills everything.
    like a virus...reminds me of that awesome scene in the first Matrix where the agent is telling Morpheus how badly he wants to get away from the humans.
    Stay out of it, dude.


    I am Van Halen.

  8. #8
    Eruption
    Join Date
    05.11.05
    Posts
    1,024
    Last Online

    10.19.17 @ 03:51 PM
    Likes
    1
    Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I call BS. As a resident of the East side of STL in Illinois, why does the rest of the state take it up the proverbial back-side but Chi gets "help"? We deal with ours (although not well). Deal with yours on your own as well.

    Glad my Illinois tax dollar is not helping anyone within 250 miles. BS. I wish they had their own state.

    They run the rest of us in the ground (note the Illinois political base and budget crisis). There is one common thread - Chicago.

    The (unfortunate) real capital of Illinois.

    We are a lot like Cali in that sense.

  9. #9
    Good Enough pal1800's Avatar
    Join Date
    10.30.07
    Age
    46
    Location
    Mandeville, LA
    Posts
    1,731
    Favorite VH Album

    Too hard to choose
    Favorite VH Song

    Too hard to choose
    Last Online

    06.02.16 @ 09:13 AM
    Likes
    0
    Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by broken9500 View Post
    like a virus...reminds me of that awesome scene in the first Matrix where the agent is telling Morpheus how badly he wants to get away from the humans.
    We are all indeed an imperfect breed, some are just worse than others, and it's tied almost exclusively to culture, not race like some may contend.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Main VH Forum Combined
    By Brett in forum VHL Forum Announcements
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03.08.10, 04:26 PM
  2. Well, He doesn't look dangerous...
    By Eddie's Little Monster in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06.08.05, 12:13 PM
  3. If you combined any musos...
    By sean112 in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Music Only)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10.17.02, 12:50 PM
  4. Dangerous Performance
    By Cabo Kid in forum Bootleg Network
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09.14.00, 01:11 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •