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  1. #1
    Good Enough brownnation's Avatar
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    Default Is Conservative Thought Being Discriminated Against?

    http://www.politicsdaily.com/2009/10...rams-should-t/

    Rush Limbaugh, Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and the Rams: Should the NFL be Renamed the 'National Liberal League'?
    Posted: 10/14/09

    Conservatives suggested this week, not unreasonably, that if one of their own is ever to be awarded a peace prize, an organization other than the Nobel committee is going to have to hand it out. Considering the onslaught against Rush Limbaugh over his effort to purchase the St. Louis Rams, a related question arises: Will conservatives soon need their own professional sports leagues, too?

    Millions of Americans tune into football games each autumn weekend precisely so they can block out the humdrum of everyday life, including the pettiness of party politics and even the pressing national problems that can never be cured with a Hail Mary pass. But sport mirrors society, and when the king of right-wing talk radio let it be known that he is part of a consortium seeking to purchase the St. Louis Rams, the partisan slings flew through the air as hard and speedily as a Brett Favre pass.

    Limbaugh preaches his own brand of caustic conservatism to an extravagantly large cheering section – the millions of devoted "ditto-heads" who faithfully give his show astronomical ratings. But in 2003 the world learned that the Rush-man had a broader set of interests than bashing Democratic politicians and the liberal media. That year, Limbaugh was hired by ESPN for sports commentary on Sunday NFL Countdown. It was a short-lived experiment. The show's conceit was that Limbaugh was to issue "challenges" to sports commentators, mimicking the challenges NFL coaches make to appeal close calls by the referees on the field of play.

    A few weeks into this moonlighting job, Limbaugh chose to "challenge" the established wisdom that the Philadelphia Eagles' Donovan McNabb is a good quarterback. Now, fans in Philly have been booing McNabb since the moment the team drafted him, and he was off to a rocky start in 2003, but it was when Limbaugh explained why he believed McNabb was overrated that he got in trouble. The beat reporters covering the NFL wouldn't criticize McNabb, he maintained, because they wanted a black quarterback to succeed. "I think what we've had here is a little social concern in the NFL," Limbaugh said. "The media has been very desirous that a black quarterback do well. There is a little hope invested in McNabb, and he got a lot of credit for the performance of this team that he didn't deserve. The defense carried this team."

    This remark seemed to strike Limbaugh's sports commentating colleagues, two of whom were black, as a deeply weird thing to say. They were literally speechless. For starters, several African-American quarterbacks had already succeeded in the NFL – and one of them, Doug Williams, won a Super Bowl 15 years earlier. Also, as far as the networks are concerned, race is the Third Rail of sport and it is a rail that has killed the careers of men with a lot more athletic street cred than Rush Limbaugh.

    In 1987, former Los Angeles Dodgers' general manager Al Campanis was asked by Ted Koppel on the 40th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's breaking of the color barrier why more African-Americans had not been made managers or front office executives. His answer – that blacks "may not have some of the necessities to be, let's say, a field manager, or, perhaps, a general manager" – got him fired within two days.

    Less than a year later, CBS Sports' on-air tout, former bookmaker Jimmy the Greek, was caught on camera musing aloud that slavery was the reason behind superior black performance in athletics.

    Speaking in a television interview days before Doug Williams' big Super Bowl win, the Greek opined: "During the slave period, the slave owner would breed his big black with his big woman so that he could have a big black kid – that's where it all started." He, too, was swiftly cashiered. Limbaugh's statement wasn't overtly racial in that way – he was beating his favorite hobbyhorse of liberal bias in the media – and it might be best thought of as a case of culture clash. But it offended the classy McNabb, who told the Philadelphia Daily News two days later. "It's sad that you've got to go to skin color. I thought we were through with that whole deal."

    Taking their cue from the quarterback, others quickly fanned the controversy. The National Association of Black Journalists, perhaps inadvertently confirming the gist of Limbaugh's claim, called for the sports network to "separate itself" from the conservative pundit. Democrats running for their party's presidential nomination jumped on it, too, as Wesley Clark, Howard Dean and Al Sharpton all demanded that ESPN fire Limbaugh. This was to be expected of Dems -- President Clinton had essentially blamed Limbaugh for the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing -- and Limbaugh was initially defiant. "All this has become the tempest that it is because I must have been right about something," he said the following Wednesday on his syndicated radio show. "If I wasn't right, there wouldn't be this cacophony of outrage that has sprung up in the sports writer community."

    He wasn't right, in either the tenor or substance of his remarks. Later that night, ESPN issued a statement disavowing Limbaugh's remarks as "insensitive and inappropriate," and he resigned soon thereafter with exceptional good grace. "My comments this past Sunday were directed at the media and were not racially motivated," Limbaugh said in a statement. "I offered an opinion. This opinion has caused discomfort to the crew, which I regret. I love NFL Sunday Countdown and do not want to be a distraction to the great work done by all who work on it."

    And so this rather minor matter was laid to rest. Or was it?

    Continued...

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    Good Enough brownnation's Avatar
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    ...

    Six years later, the knives have come out again. Limbaugh's ostensible sin was his comment directed at McNabb, who is still the Eagles' starting quarterback. But partisan politics seem to be at play here, too, with the involvement of many of the usual suspects, including Sharpton and Jesse Jackson, and some whose political views no one has ever had occasion to hear before.

    Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay said Tuesday that he wouldn't want Limbaugh as a colleague, "I, myself, couldn't even consider voting for him," Irsay told reporters. "I met Rush only once. He seemed like a nice guy to me and all those kind of things, (but) it's bigger than the NFL. As a nation, and as a world, we've got to watch our words and our thoughts. They can do damage."

    New York Jets linebacker Bart Scott was more succinct. "I know I wouldn't want to play for him," Scott told the New York Daily News. "He's a jerk. He's an _______."

    Apparently, Scott didn't get the talking point about watching "our words and our thoughts" and about how intemperate language can do damage. Then again, this isn't only about Limbaugh's ill-considered comment about Donovan McNabb. It's also about politics. Limbaugh is the conservative who said famously that he hopes President Obama fails. The campaign against Limbaugh was launched by an Obama supporter named DeMaurice Smith, who also happens to be the newly installed executive director of the NFL players union.

    Smith, who has no background in football, emerged earlier this year as a compromise candidate – and a surprise choice – to replace the legendary Gene Upshaw in the job. Smith, who ran track at Cedarville University, a small Christian college in Ohio, became a federal prosecutor after law school, rising through the ranks to assume several leadership positions in the U.S. Attorney's Office in Washington, D.C., and becoming well-connected in the process. Smith worked closely with current U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, served on the board of a charitable foundation with prominent ex-Washington Redskins stars Charles Mann and Art Monk, and joined the politically powerful and predominately Democratic law firm Patton Boggs. In 2008, Smith made political contributions to Barack Obama.

    Nothing is wrong with any of this, but it puts DeMaurice Smith's very public crusade against Rush Limbaugh's ownership bid in a somewhat different light. And it raises new kinds of issues for athletes. Should they refuse to play for an owner whose political views are not in sync with their own? On what issues? Abortion? Global warming? (And will their agents dare tell the players that, before the next collective bargaining agreement is signed between the NFL players and the owners, Obama and the Democratic Congress is likely to raise their taxes?)

    Or should we go whole hog and rename the New York Jets the New York Yellow Dog Democrats? Should the (red state) Atlanta Falcons become the Atlanta Elephants (and the blue state Seattle Seahawks the Seattle Donkeys? What about those pesky monikers that are not politically correct, such as the Redskins and the Chiefs. Perhaps those need to be be changed. (I kind of like Kansas City Trumans. They could play the Washington Eisenhowers in honor of the last Republican president whom D.C. Democrats can abide – and the first president of either party to sign a civil rights bill.) This all may seem silly, but it isn't. Team sports are supposed to unite the people of a given locale, not divide them. One of the things that traditionally unites sports fans, by the way, is the perfidy of the owners.

    Jesse Jackson made a sage observation this week. He noted that owning a pro football team is a "privilege" and not a right. He's right, and it's worth reiterating that Limbaugh's looming freeze-out is not censorship: He still has a right to say what he wants on the radio and if that makes him rich or costs him opportunities outside his chosen field – and clearly, it's done both for Limbaugh – that's part of life.

    On the other hand, if outspoken liberal MSNBC host (and frequent Limbaugh basher) Keith Olbermann is appalled by the groupthink attack on Limbaugh, that ought to give DeMaurice Smith and Limbaugh's other critics pause. "There're now gonna be character tests for sports owners?" Olbermann asked incredulously on the air this week. "There'll only be three of them left."

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    i can see why if i were an owner in the NFL that I might not want to let this guy in the club. There's nothing wrong with discriminating against the type of person who says:

    "Look, let me put it to you this way: The NFL all too often looks like a game between the Bloods and the Crips without any weapons. There, I said it."

    "I mean, let's face it, we didn't have slavery in this country for over 100 years because it was a bad thing. Quite the opposite: Slavery built the South. I'm not saying we should bring it back. I'm just saying it had its merits. For one thing, the streets were safer after dark."

    This is about Conservative thought being discriminated against. Most owners in the NFL are likely Conservative.

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    Quote Originally Posted by It's Mike View Post
    i can see why if i were an owner in the NFL that I might not want to let this guy in the club. There's nothing wrong with discriminating against the type of person who says:

    "Look, let me put it to you this way: The NFL all too often looks like a game between the Bloods and the Crips without any weapons. There, I said it."

    "I mean, let's face it, we didn't have slavery in this country for over 100 years because it was a bad thing. Quite the opposite: Slavery built the South. I'm not saying we should bring it back. I'm just saying it had its merits. For one thing, the streets were safer after dark."

    This is about Conservative thought being discriminated against. Most owners in the NFL are likely Conservative.
    I don't think this would even be a question if it were a liberal.

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    11.30.17 @ 11:15 AM
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    The wanna-be ownership group has dropped Rush.
    Sammy did the impossible. He made Van Halen better. Deal with it.
    Michael did the impossible. He made Van Halen better. Deal with it.
    --------------------------
    IAMA I am a stage hand for big mainstream artists. (self.IAmA)

    Q: who was the biggest douche that you have worked with?

    A: Eddie Van Halen hands down he threatened all the stage hands that if we wernt all pushed to the side when he got off stage that he would "bash our faces in"

    Now the new David-Lee-Roth-Van Halen album, “Tokyo Dome In Concert,” is available for purchase, and it’s super, super, super, super, super, super, crazy bad. - Doug Elfman

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    Quote Originally Posted by brownnation View Post
    I don't think this would even be a question if it were a liberal.
    why? do u think a group of rich white conservative owners would be more happy to have a liberal jackass join their club than a conservative jackass? I don't get your point.

    The union doesn't dislike him because he's conservative, they dislike him because he's a racist fool. If I was representing a largely black group of athletes i wouldn't want a racist like Rush associated with my sport either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheresOnlyOneWay View Post
    The wanna-be ownership group has dropped Rush.
    as they should, they never would have been approved with him included.

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    The Faith-Based Encyclopedia In Action

    Check your sources, bitches...

    The Faith-Based Encyclopedia In Action

    Red State’s Leon H. Wolf has an excellent post describing how easy it is to fabricate a quote, place it in Wikiquote, an adjunct to Wikipedia, and then use it as a source to smear your opponent:

    Having failed to prevent Rush Limbaugh from becoming a successful and wealthy entertainer, the mainstream media has apparently decided that they will attempt the next best thing; attempt to keep Rush Limbaugh from spending his money in the way he desires. In this case, Rush apparently desires to spend his money on a portion of the controlling stock in the St. Louis Rams of the National Football League. In the initial stages of this story, the media attempted to thwart Limbaugh’s plans by trumpeting his comments from several years ago to the effect that the media was overrating Donovan McNabb as a quarterback because they were desirous of seeing a black quarterback succeed. Apparently, has at long last realized the self-evident truth that Limbaugh’s comments about McNabb could not be construed as racist by anyone not determined to find racism in any sentence containing the word “black.” Therefore, they have set about with phase two of this story, attacking Limbaugh as racist with completely fabricated and unsourced quotes… from Wiki.

    I first became aware of this latest brouhaha when I opened FoxSports.com this morning as I typically do to check and see if anything interesting happened in the previous evening of sports. I was greeted with a huge front-page box featuring this insipid column from the execrable Jason Whitlock. By way of reminder, Jason Whitlock recently wrote this ridiculous column, which somehow passes for insightful commentary while Limbaugh’s comments about McNabb are evil, thoughtless, and racist. But I digress. The newest basis for the assertion that Limbaugh is an eeeeeevil racist is as follows, according to Whitlock:

    Here are two quotes attributed to Limbaugh in a 2006 book, “101 People Who Are Really Screwing America,” by Jack Huberman.

    * “You know who deserves a posthumous Medal of Honor? James Earl Ray (Dr. King’s assassin). We miss you, James. Godspeed.”
    * “Let’s face it, we didn’t have slavery in this country for over 100 years because it was a bad thing. Quite the opposite: Slavery built the South. I’m not saying we should bring it back. I’m just saying it had its merits. For one thing, the streets were safer after dark.”

    The first of these quotes has already been debunked most thoroughly, long before Rush’s bid to buy the Rams. It is self-evidently the complete fabrication of someone with a wiki account, which was then picked up by the unscrupulous Huberman and reported as fact (with no citations at all) in his book. The other, also attributed to Huberman, has never been sourced, and Huberman has never cited any original article, or even given any indication as to when this alleged statement was made. Of course, these facts make it utterly impossible to refute the claim; without any date or context, Rush cannot even call witnesses who were present during the alleged confirmation to confirm or deny that he ever made such a statement. It is literally impossible for Limbaugh (or anyone else) to offer convincing proof that they have never at any time made a given statement (other than their own denial, which Rush has already given). It is preposterous to ask anyone to prove that they did not make a statement if you cannot even so much as offer a time and place where the statement is alleged to have occurred.

    And yet, this is the position in which Limbaugh finds himself.
    And worse, idiots like Whitlock seem to think that it’s entirely appropriate to believe this completely unsourced accusation:

    Limbaugh claimed on his radio show Monday that his staff could not find any proof that he ever joked about slavery. I’m sorry. Limbaugh doesn’t get the benefit of the doubt on racial matters.

    See? In Jason Whitlock’s world, anyone at any time can claim that some unidentified person told them that Rush Limbaugh said [X], at a time and place they can’t identify, and if it touches on anything racial, it is fair to assume that Rush really said it because he doesn’t get “the benefit of the doubt.” This isn’t about the “benefit of the doubt,” it’s about whether the accusation is serious enough to create any doubt at all in the first place.

    Of course, this is far from the first political controversy to be ginned up by Wikipedia’s “anybody can post” philosophy.

    In 2004, Robert McHenry dubbed the site, “The Faith-Based Encyclopedia” at Tech Central Station. A year later, there was a scandal at Wikipedia that actually made a blip on the MSM’s radar, as I wrote at the time. Coincidentally, it was built around two other American icons assassinated in the 1960s:

    John Seigenthaler, Sr. was the assistant to Robert Kennedy when he was attorney general under JFK. His Wikipedia entry originally read as follows:

    “John Seigenthaler Sr. was the assistant to Attorney General Robert Kennedy in the early 1960’s. For a brief time, he was thought to have been directly involved in the Kennedy assassinations of both John, and his brother, Bobby. Nothing was ever proven.”

    Needless to say, Seigenthaler is — to say the least — not happy, and has harsh words for the Wiki concept in USA Today.

    I always find it fascinating that Limbaugh, who helped expose black libertarian/conservative academicians Thomas Sowell and Walter Williams to a huge new audience through their repeated guest-host slots during Rush’s frequent Carson-esque days off, is smeared as a racist. And such attacks have come from the highest realm in the land — but then, that was an era before the word’s massive overuse has caused it to go from being the 21st century equivalent of “commie” in the 1950s, to becoming an increasingly worn-out cliche.

    As Jeffrey Lord writes at the American Spectator:

    Liberals masquerading as “sports reporters” and “journalists” have been out there repeating this kind of garbage in the last few days. The goal: to keep Rush from buying an ownership stake in the St. Louis Rams.

    It doesn’t take a wizard to know the reason that this kind of thing (and a lot of other unprintable garbage) is routinely attributed not only to Rush but other conservative talk radio hosts. There is a point to it, as conservatives understand. Instead of engaging on the battlefield of ideas, liberals project a prejudice they picked up from the left’s own culture of racism, a “progressive” culture that, as often noted in this space, has ranged over the centuries from support for slavery to segregation to lynching to racial quotas and identity politics. This is frequently noted here in this space, two examples of which can be found here and here.


    And make no mistake:

    Rush today, some other conservative tomorrow.

    In the mid-1990s, Wired magazine coined the phrase “Pierre Salinger Syndrome”, named after JFK and LBJ’s press secretary, to describe someone taken in by something he found on the still new and novel World Wide Web:

    Veteran American newsman Pierre Salinger said today he has a government document saying that Navy gunners accidentally shot down TWA Flight 800 while conducting missile tests, killing all 230 people aboard. . . . Salinger said the document was dated Aug. 22 and was posted on the Internet at the beginning of September.
    —Jocelyn Noveck, “Paper On “Test’ Offered To FBI,” The Associated Press, November 8, 1996

    Shortly thereafter, print and television journalists would begin railing against Web-based journalists such as Matt Drudge, and a few years later, the Blogosphere in general. But it’s amazing how quickly they’ll acquire their own cases of Salinger syndrome when the target is one of their favorite bogeymen.

    Update: Mark Steyn notes the Epic Fail of the Media-Industrial Complex, which employs not just Media Matters as their de facto in-house stenographers of all things Rush, but also benefits from the “gotcha!” nature of the Blogosphere and YouTube. By 2006, given Rush’s 20 million listeners, not all of them supportive, somebody would have clipped off such a damning quote, from either a tape of the show as it aired live, or from the podcast versions that Rush’s team has been porting to the Web since mid-2005 and uploaded the audio to YouTube for all to hear. But, the legacy media Wants To Believe, Tim Blair sagely adds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by It's Mike View Post
    why? do u think a group of rich white conservative owners would be more happy to have a liberal jackass join their club than a conservative jackass? I don't get your point.

    The union doesn't dislike him because he's conservative, they dislike him because he's a racist fool. If I was representing a largely black group of athletes i wouldn't want a racist like Rush associated with my sport either.
    They most likely dropped him because of thuggish liberal tactics. It is the thought police at work again.

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    how many of the current owners in the nfl do u think are left leaning liberals? this has nothing to do with politics. The league, quite rightly, does not want their brand to be thrown into the toilet. They learned a valuable lesson from his ESPN experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brownnation View Post
    They most likely dropped him because of thuggish liberal tactics. It is the thought police at work again.
    no it's good business. there's no shortage of people looking to invest in nfl clubs. no need to pick up owners with rush-level baggage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by It's Mike View Post
    how many of the current owners in the nfl do u think are left leaning liberals? this has nothing to do with politics. The league, quite rightly, does not want their brand to be thrown into the toilet. They learned a valuable lesson from his ESPN experience.
    If your assessment of NFL owners is correct and they are in fact conservative this only proves my point! They wouldn't do it because of the vicious campaign that would be waged against them from the liberal freaks who love tolerance until you disagree with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by It's Mike View Post
    no it's good business. there's no shortage of people looking to invest in nfl clubs. no need to pick up owners with rush-level baggage.
    Shit Mike do we agree on anything??? Where you are liberal I'm conservative, where I'm liberal you're siding with priests!! I know you hate free speech but do you at least like puppies? Tell me we can agree on puppies?

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    Quote Originally Posted by brownnation View Post
    If your assessment of NFL owners is correct and they are in fact conservative this only proves my point! They wouldn't do it because of the vicious campaign that would be waged against them from the liberal freaks who love tolerance until you disagree with them.
    you're kidding me, right?

    this has NOTHING to do with being conservative. They have approved all kinds of conservatives to be owners. This has everything to do with not wanting to associate their product with a guy who's a timebomb that could go off at any given moment. If the Black Panther party wanted to buy the Raiders, I think the league might take issue with that too.

    BN,

    if you had hundreds of millions of dollars invested in a club, would u want Rush to join your club or would u prefer someone who didn't have his profile?

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    Default Rush Has No Place in the NFL, But Look Who Does

    Rush Has No Place in the NFL, But Look Who Does

    NFL Commish Roger Goodell said that Rush Limbaugh and his “divisive comments” have no place in the NFL.

    What does have a place in the NFL? Here’s a short list of players who were active after being convicted of felonies — I added Michael Vick to a list I found here:

    – Michael Vick: felony dogfighting charges
    – Leonard Little: vehicular manslaughter/DUI
    – Michael Irvin: felony drug possession
    – Ray Lewis: obstruction of justice in a murder
    – Plaxico Burress: felony weapon possession (in jail but not yet banned for life from the NFL)
    – Pacman Jones: technically a felon since he pled guilty to obstruction of an officer case in GA

    And what has Limbaugh done? Said some words that some people disagree with — and in some cases he hasn’t said them at all because the quotes have been made up.

    As for owners, former wide receiver Tim Brown once accused Al Davis, the owner of the Oakland Raiders, of being a racist. What’s Al still doing in the NFL, Rog? Isn’t the mere accusation enough? It’s certainly enough to exclude Limbaugh from your little club.

    What a joke the NFL is making of itself. Fortunately, I’m a Lions fan, so I’m all too used to jokes.

    Update: How’s this for timing — Fergie (Stacy Ferguson), a singer with the Black Eyed Peas, has been approved by the NFL to be a part-owner of the Miami Dolphins.

    Here’s part of the lyrics for a BEP song called “Head Bobs” (this was released before Fergie joined the band):

    I’m hard to handle like bikes with no bars
    We excite stores that got dykes leaving doors
    Unlock the heated ’cause they know when I sex well
    Left them breathless now they’re waiting to exhale
    Waiting to exhale with some competition
    So come in and test well
    The next one gets hung and chip of a chisel
    I’m making chicks’ nipples sizzle
    There’s no question to the way I rip the riddle
    I’m awesome, I bring on monsoon when I bloom and blossom
    And run over niggas like opossums


    But since that was recorded pre-Fergie (though clearly that sort of thing didn’t turn her off enough not to join the group), let’s look at some post-Fergie BEP work just to be fair. Here’s one called “Pump It”:

    Ha ha ha
    Pump it
    Ha ha ha
    And pump it (louder) [4x]

    Turn up the radio
    Blast your stereo
    Right

    Niggas wanna hate on us (who)
    Niggas be envious (who)
    And I know why they hatin’ on us (why)
    Cause that’s so fabulous (what)
    I’ma be real on us (c’mon)
    Nobody got nuttin’ on us (no)
    Girls be all on us, from London back down to the US


    Or the 2009 song “Electric City”:

    Fergie]

    Na Na NaNa Na Na NaNa

    Ghetto blaster blastin’ on your block
    Pumpin out megahurtz (mega-megawatts)
    You can get electric shock from my flow
    Bitches on my dick (Oh No) They on my dildo
    Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do
    I get the money money, I get dough
    EQ the equalizer for the stereo


    Peruse all the band’s lyrics and I’m sure you’ll find numerous other examples of the kind of high-class that the NFL is looking for in its ownership.

    But anyway, back to how Rush Limbaugh is way too inappropriate for the NFL…

 

 

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