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  1. #1
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    Default China in new fake milk powder scandal

    A HEALTH scare in China involving babies developing kidney stones after drinking possibly fake milk formula is spreading across the country.

    One baby had died from kidney stones in northwest Gansu province, Xinhua quoted health officials as saying, but it was not clear if there was any link to milk powder in that case.

    The health scare has revived memories of a grim scandal involving fake milk powder that killed at least 13 babies in eastern China in 2004.

    An unknown number of infants in at least seven provinces and regions were suffering from kidney stones after drinking milk formula marked "Sanlu", Xinhua news agency said, citing local media reports.

    Xinhua yesterday quoted doctors at a hospital in Gansu as saying that "fake milk powder" from one brand could have been responsible for kidney stones developing in 14 patients, all infants under 11 months.

    Cases of babies developing kidney stones had emerged in three other hospitals in Gansu and also in Jiangsu, Shandong, Hunan, Anhui, Ningxia and Shaanxi provinces, Xinhua said.

    Health officials in Gansu were investigating, Xinhua said.

    Dairy company Sanlu Group said that the products "may be fake" and that it had sent people to Gansu to conduct its own investigation, Xinhua said, quoting a company spokesman surnamed Zhang.

    Parents of the affected babies, mostly from remote and poor rural areas, had bought the milk powder at much cheaper prices than usual, Xinhua said.

    Kidney stones are small, solid masses that form when salts or minerals normally found in urine crystallise inside the kidney.

    If they become large enough, they can move out of the kidney, cause infection and lead to permanent kidney damage.

    In 2004, at least 13 babies in eastern Anhui province died after drinking fake milk powder that investigators later found had no nutritional value, a scandal that rocked the country and triggered widespread investigations into food and health safety.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  2. #2
    Atomic Punk
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    BEIJING - China's government vowed "serious punishment" on Friday after a major dairy recalled 700 tons of milk powder linked to a rash of kidney stones in infants in a case that reignited fears about Chinese product safety.

    U.S. authorities warned American consumers to avoid all Chinese infant formula. A New Zealand company that owns a stake in the Chinese producer said it believed none of the powder was exported from China.

    Sanlu Group Co., China's biggest milk powder producer, ordered the recall after more than 50 babies suffered kidney stones and one died, the official Xinhua News Agency said. It said tests found it was tainted with melamine, a chemical used in plastics.

    "Those responsible will face serious punishment," said a Health Ministry spokesman, Mao Qunan, quoted by Xinhua. The agency said investigators concluded the chemical was added when the milk was purchased from farmers but gave no other details. It said 78 "suspicious people" were summoned for questioning.

    A leading Chinese business magazine, Caijing, quoted Sanlu's brand manager, Su Changsheng, as saying the company knew about the contamination on Aug. 6 but refrained from telling the public. Su said Sanlu kept silent because some grocers refused to return tainted powder, but the report did not say why that prevented a warning.

    People who answered the phone at Sanlu said managers were not available to comment.

    China has suffered a string of safety incidents over tainted toothpaste, toys, seafood and other products that caused deaths or injuries. The incidents damaged foreign confidence in the safety of Chinese goods and prompted a shake-up of the country's regulatory system in an effort to reassure consumers.

    Melamine is the chemical involved in a massive pet food recall last year. It is not supposed to be added to food, but suppliers in China sometimes mix it in to make food appear to be high in protein. Melamine is nitrogen rich, and standard tests for protein in bulk food ingredients measure levels of nitrogen.

    The Sanlu manager Su, quoted on Caijing's Web site, said "criminal farmers" added melamine to the milk, possibly to make the protein content appear higher. The tainted milk was used in powder made from March to Aug. 5 for newborn babies to to 3 year olds, Su said. He said other batches were free of the chemical.

    The Health Ministry launched a nationwide investigation, ordering local officials to report all possible cases and "is urgently organizing experts to conduct research and treatment," a ministry statement said.

    Fonterra Co-operative Group, a New Zealand dairy farmers' group that owns 43 percent of Sanlu, said it was advised the company had a "quality issue in its products as a result of receiving defective milk in China."

    "We understand that the product involved is only sold in China," Fonterra said in a statement e-mailed to The Associated Press.

    The milk powder is sold in China under the name Sanlu Bei Bei Infant Powder.

    At about 1 p.m. on Friday, hackers changed Sanlu's Web site to say "Melamine Group" for about 20 minutes before the original page was restored, the Web portal Sina.com reported.

    In Washington, the Food and Drug Administration warned consumers to avoid infant formula from China. Authorities said Chinese formula is not approved for importation into the United States but might be sold at ethnic grocery stores.

    "We're concerned that there may be some infant formula that may have gotten into the United States illegally and may be on the ethnic market," said Janice Oliver, deputy director of the FDA's food safety program.

    Sanlu, based in Shijiazhuang, a city southwest of Beijing, has 18 percent of China's market for milk powder, according to government data. The company says it produces 6,800 tons of milk a day.

    Sanlu became the dairy supplier to China's space program in June and might provide milk for astronauts on the country's upcoming third manned space flight.

    In 2004, more than 200 Chinese infants suffered malnutrition and at least 12 died after being fed phony formula that contained no nutrients. Some 40 companies were found to be making phony formula and 47 people were arrested.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  3. #3
    Atomic Punk
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    BEIJING - The list of products caught in China's tainted milk scandal grew Friday to include baby cereal in Hong Kong and snack foods in Japan, while Taiwan reported three children and a mother with kidney stones in the island's first cases possibly linked to the crisis.

    The Japanese government also said it had suspended imports of milk and milk products from China, where some 54,000 children have developed kidney stones or other illnesses after drinking baby formula contaminated with the industrial chemical melamine. Four deaths have been blamed on the tainted milk.

    The latest problematic foods were Heinz baby cereal and Silang House steamed potato wasabi crackers. The Hong Kong government said in a statement Friday it found traces of melamine in the products, which were both made in mainland China.

    Hong Kong urged the manufacturers to stop selling the products in the Chinese territory. Pittsburgh, Pa.-based Heinz ordered a recall of the baby cereal as a precautionary measure following the government's announcement, it said in a statement on its Web site.

    Hundreds of international food companies have set up operations in China in recent years, exposing them to the country's notorious product safety problems. Melamine-tainted products have turned up in an increasing number of Chinese-made exports abroad — from candies to yogurt to rice balls.

    In Japan, the Marudai Food Co. pulled its cream buns, meat buns and creamed corn crepes from supermarkets a week ago and tests have found traces of contamination in several products, Japanese Health and Welfare Ministry official Mina Kojima said Friday.

    So far, there were no reports of health problems stemming from the contamination, she said. Marudai has sold more than 300,000 of the products, most of which are believed to have been consumed.

    News of that contamination came after the Chinese territory of Macau said it detected melamine at 24 times the safety limit in products from another Japan-based company, Koala's March cookies made by Lotte China Foods Co. The company is a member of a Tokyo-based conglomerate, Lotte Group.

    An official at Lotte (China) Investment Co. Ltd. in Shanghai said Friday previous inspections had not shown any problems.

    "But now that it tested positive in Macau, we find it necessary to do the inspections all over again," said Guo Hongming, a legal assistant in Lotte Shanghai's corporate planning department.

    Some Hong Kong supermarkets pulled the chocolate-filled cookies off shelves Friday after the announcement by Macau authorities late Thursday. Cookie packages list whole milk powder as an ingredient.

    Only some types of milk powder and milk have been recalled in mainland China so far, but the maker of one of China's most popular candies said Friday it had halted sales because of suspected melamine contamination. White Rabbit candies have already been pulled from shelves around Asia and in Britain.

    Ge Junjie, a vice president of Bright Foods (Group) Co. Ltd., was quoted as saying by the official Xinhua News Agency that the company was waiting for test results from the Shanghai Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau.

    "We decided to halt all sales of White Rabbit candy, although the test results have not yet come out," Ge said. Bright Foods' subsidiary Guangshengyuan produces White Rabbit.

    Meanwhile, Taiwanese authorities reported that three children who consumed Chinese milk formula had developed kidney stones, and doctors were checking whether their illnesses were linked to tainted products.

    The two 3-year-old girls and a 1-year-old boy traveled frequently between Taiwan and China with their parents, said Liu Yi-lien, health chief of the Ilan county government in eastern Taiwan. One of the girls' mothers also has kidney stones, he said.

    "They have all consumed Chinese milk, but more tests are needed to establish the link to their kidney stones," Liu said.

    The cases are the first reports of illnesses on the island that could be related to tainted Chinese milk products. Six children have also become ill from melamine-tainted products in the Chinese territories of Hong Kong and Macau.

    Still, the World Health Organization said it did not expect the number of victims to grow dramatically.

    WHO China representative Hans Troedsson said public awareness of the issue meant many young children were getting health checks and avoiding tainted products.

    "I think we will see some more cases, but not the high number like so far," he said. "I think the recall and more thorough investigation and testing are now starting to eliminate some of these contaminated products from coming out to the public."

    On Thursday, the European Union banned imports of baby food containing Chinese milk. The move by the 27-nation EU adds to the growing list of countries that have banned or recalled Chinese dairy products because of the contamination.

    Health experts say ingesting a small amount of melamine poses no danger, but in larger doses, the chemical — used to make plastics and fertilizer — can cause kidney stones and lead to kidney failure. Infants are particularly vulnerable.

    Chinese suppliers trying to cut costs are believed to have diluted their milk while adding melamine because its nitrogen content can fool tests aimed at verifying protein levels.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  4. #4
    Atomic Punk
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    Chinese lawyers face pressure to drop milk cases

    Lawyers advising the families of children sickened in China's tainted milk scandal said Tuesday they are facing growing official pressure to withdraw from the cases.

    A loose grouping of more than 100 lawyers across China have been offering free legal advice to the families of children who became ill after drinking milk laced with the industrial chemical melamine, said Chang Boyang, one of the lawyers.

    The group already has helped the parents of a 1-year-old boy who developed kidney stones after drinking tainted milk to file a lawsuit against the dairy at the center of the crisis, Sanlu Group Co. The court in Henan province has not yet said whether it will hear the suit, believed to be the first since the scandal broke last month.

    The government has been struggling to show the public that it is dealing successfully with the scandal, which has battered the country's image, so carefully cultivated during the Beijing Olympics. At least four babies have died and more than 54,000 children have been sickened.

    On Monday, the State Council, China's Cabinet and highest government body, acknowledged the dairy industry was "chaotic" and had suffered from a grave lack of oversight, while pledging to monitor milk products from farm to dinner table.

    But the government has also imposed controls on media coverage of the crisis, suggesting it does not want it to become a focal point of public dismay.

    At least 14 lawyers from Henan province who have been advising victims' families were told by officials from the provincial government's justice department to stop their activities, Chang told the Associated Press in a telephone interview.

    "They called me and my boss at my law firm and put pressure on me," Chang said. "They said that this has become a political issue and that I ought to follow the arrangements set out by the government."

    "If this suggestion is disobeyed, the lawyer and the firm will be dealt with," Chang quoted the official as saying.

    Henan's justice department could not immediately be reached for comment.

    Chang said he and the other lawyers from Henan took their names off the list of the group's volunteers but still continue to field calls and offer advice.

    "This incident will not affect my work. I was just giving the authorities 'face' by taking my name off the list," Chang said. "Sometimes you've got to learn to compromise."

    The State Council has ordered hospitals to provide free treatment for sick infants, but children like the toddler whose parents filed last month's lawsuit are not covered because he became sick before the scandal broke on Sept. 12. Free medical care is only available to those sickened after that date.

    Chang said the lawyers have been preparing other clients for a potential joint lawsuit if the government continues to refuse to provide compensation.

    Chinese authorities have blamed dairy suppliers for the scandal, saying they added melamine to watered-down milk to fool quality control tests and make the product appear rich in protein. The chemical can cause kidney stones as the body tries to eliminate it and, in extreme cases, lead to life-threatening kidney failure.

    The crisis — which has spread overseas with Chinese milk products pulled out of stores in dozens of countries — has forced the government to fire local and even high-level officials for negligence, and make repeated promises to raise product safety standards.

    Brazil and Liberia became the latest countries to take action. Brazil barred all Chinese food imports Tuesday, while Liberia banned Chinese dairy products.

    Meanwhile, China's iconic White Rabbit candy was back in production after being pulled from shelves in the U.S., Europe and Asia following tests that found it contained melamine, a state-run newspaper reported Tuesday.

    Guan Sheng Yuan Co. did not say when the candy would go on sale again, according to China Daily. The company could not be immediately contacted Tuesday.

    Meanwhile, Vietnam's vice minister of health, Cao Minh Quang, said Tuesday that 23 milk products had tested positive for melamine. The country has already recalled 300 tons of products, most imported from China.

    In the Philippines, traces of melamine were found in a milk product that already had been pulled from store shelves. It's the third Chinese-made milk product sold in the country found to be tainted.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  5. #5
    Atomic Punk smithjc's Avatar
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    I hate to say it but I no longer trust anything made in China. But who the hell else will make stuff??
    RIP - Classic Van Halen

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  6. #6
    Gird your loins Daisy Hill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithjc View Post
    I hate to say it but I no longer trust anything made in China. But who the hell else will make stuff??
    the next cheap work force will come from Africa, is my guess

  7. #7
    Atomic Punk WinterlessIceness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daisy Hill View Post
    the next cheap work force will come from Africa, is my guess
    That work force would require 24/7 US Marines protection, so it wouldn't be cheap after then.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daisy Hill View Post
    the next cheap work force will come from Africa, is my guess
    WHO in Africe? Ive received a lot of email from people in Africa, and they ALL have bank accounts with millions...it just needs to be transferred to MY account here
    "Look, I'll pay you for it, what the f**k?!"

    "If I don't make her happy in the bedroom the wife gets bitchy for days at a time, but when I come to bed ready for action she laughs and laughs. She even laughs while I make my moves so I know I must be pleasing her as only I can do."
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  9. #9
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    FDA finds traces of melamine in US infant formula

    Traces of the industrial chemical melamine have been detected in samples of top-selling U.S. infant formula, but federal regulators insist the products are safe. The Food and Drug Administration said last month it was unable to identify any melamine exposure level as safe for infants, but a top official said it would be a "dangerous overreaction" for parents to stop feeding infant formula to babies who depend on it.

    "The levels that we are detecting are extremely low," said Dr. Stephen Sundlof, director of the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. "They should not be changing the diet. If they've been feeding a particular product, they should continue to feed that product. That's in the best interest of the baby."

    Melamine is the chemical found in Chinese infant formula — in far larger concentrations — that has been blamed for killing at least three babies and making at least 50,000 others ill.

    Previously undisclosed tests, obtained by The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act, show that the FDA has detected melamine in a sample of one popular formula and the presence of cyanuric acid, a chemical relative of melamine, in the formula of a second manufacturer.

    Separately, a third major formula maker told AP that in-house tests had detected trace levels of melamine in its infant formula.

    The three firms — Abbott Laboratories, Nestle and Mead Johnson — manufacture more than 90 percent of all infant formula produced in the United States.

    The FDA and other experts said the melamine contamination in U.S.-made formula had occurred during the manufacturing process, rather than intentionally.

    The U.S. government quietly began testing domestically produced infant formula in September, soon after problems with melamine-spiked formula surfaced in China.

    Sundlof said there have been no reports of human illness in the United States from melamine, which can bind with other chemicals in urine, potentially causing damaging stones in the kidney or bladder and, in extreme cases, kidney failure.

    Melamine is used in some U.S. plastic food packaging and can rub off onto what we eat; it's also contained in a cleaning solution used on some food processing equipment and can leach into the products being prepared.

    Sundlof told the AP the positive test results "so far are in the trace range, and from a public health or infant health perspective, we consider those to be perfectly fine."

    That's different from the impression of zero tolerance the agency left on Oct. 3, when it stated: "FDA is currently unable to establish any level of melamine and melamine-related compounds in infant formula that does not raise public health concerns."

    FDA scientists said then that they couldn't set an acceptable level of melamine exposure in infant formula because science hadn't had enough time to understand the chemical's effects on infants' underdeveloped kidneys. Plus, there is the complicating factor that infant formula often constitutes a newborn's entire diet.

    The agency added, however, that its position did not mean that any exposure to a detectable level of melamine and melamine-related compounds in infant formula would result in harm to infants.

    Still, the announcement was widely interpreted by manufacturers, the news media and Congress to mean that infant formula that tested positive at any level could not be sold in the United States.

    The Grocery Manufacturers Association, for example, told its members: "FDA could not identify a safe level for melamine and related compounds in infant formula; thus it can be concluded they will not accept any detectable melamine in infant formula."

    It was not until the AP inquired about tests on domestic formula that the FDA articulated that while it couldn't set a safe exposure for infants, it would accept some melamine in formula — raising the question of whether the decision to accept very low concentrations was made only after traces were detected.

    On Sunday, Sundlof said the agency had never said, nor implied, that domestic infant formula was going to be entirely free of melamine. He said he didn't know if the agency's statements on infant formula had been misinterpreted.

    In China, melamine was intentionally dumped into watered-down milk to trick food quality tests into showing higher protein levels than actually existed. Byproducts of the milk ended up in infant formula, coffee creamers, even biscuits.

    The concentrations of melamine there were extraordinarily high, as much as 2,500 parts per million. The concentrations detected in the FDA samples were 10,000 times smaller — the equivalent of a drop in a 64-gallon trash bin.

    There would be no economic advantage to spiking U.S.-made formula at the extremely low levels found in the FDA testing. It neither raises the protein count nor saves valuable protein, said University of California, Davis chemist Michael Filigenzi, a melamine detection expert.

    According to FDA data for tests of 77 infant formula samples, a trace concentration of melamine was detected in one product — Mead Johnson's Infant Formula Powder, Enfamil LIPIL with Iron. An FDA spreadsheet shows two tests were conducted on the Enfamil, with readings of 0.137 and 0.14 parts per million.

    Three tests of Nestle's Good Start Supreme Infant Formula with Iron detected an average of 0.247 parts per million of cyanuric acid, a melamine byproduct.

    The FDA said last month that the toxicity of cyanuric acid is under study, but that meanwhile it is "prudent" to assume that its potency is equal to that of melamine.

    And while the FDA said tests of 18 samples of formula made by Abbott Laboratories, including its Similac brand, did not detect melamine, spokesman Colin McBean said some company tests did find the chemical. He did not identify the specific product or the number of positive tests.

    McBean did say the detections were at levels far below the health limits set by all countries in the world, including Taiwan, where the limit is 0.05 parts per million.

    "We're talking about trace amounts right here, and you know there's a lot of scientific bodies out there that say low levels of melamine are always present in certain types of foods," said McBean.

    Mead Johnson spokeswoman Gail Wood said her company's in-house tests had not detected any melamine, and that the company had not been informed of the FDA test results, even during a confidential agency conference call Monday with infant formula makers about melamine contamination.

    The FDA tests also detected melamine in two samples of nutritional supplements for very sick children who have trouble digesting regular food. Nestle's Peptamen Junior medical food showed 0.201 and 0.206 parts per million of melamine while Nestle's Nutren Junior-Fiber showed 0.16 and 0.184 parts per million.

    The agency said that while there are no established exposure levels for infant formula, pediatric medical food — often used in feeding tubes for very sick, young children — can have 2.5 parts per million of melamine, just like food products other than infant formula.

    In a written response to questions, a Nestle spokesman denied that any of the company's products contained cyanuric acid, and said its products are safe.

    Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., who heads a panel that oversees the FDA budget, said the agency was taking a "marketplace first, science last" approach.

    "The FDA should be insisting on a zero-tolerance policy for melamine in domestic infant formula until it is able to determine conclusively based on sound independent science that the trace levels would not pose a health risk to infants," DeLauro said.

    Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Mich., a frequent critic of the FDA, said: "If no safe level of melamine has been established for consumption by children, then the FDA should immediately recall any formula that has tested positive for even trace amounts of the contaminant."

    Several medical experts said trace concentrations would be diluted even in an infant, and are highly unlikely to be harmful.

    "It's just a tiny amount, it's very unlikely to cause stones," said Stanford University Medical School pediatrics professor Dr. Paul Grimm.

    Dr. Jerome Paulson, an associate professor of pediatrics at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., said he didn't think the FDA's decision was unreasonable. He added, however, that the agency should research the impacts of long-term, low-dose exposure, "and not just assume it's safe, and then 15 years from now find out that it's not."
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  10. #10
    Gird your loins Daisy Hill's Avatar
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    "it's very unlikely to cause kidney stones" Holy cow, as painful as kidney stones are to an adult can you imagine an infant suffering like that? I wouldn't take the chance....

    "the boob is better" as my DO always says....and I mean "always" as in so often and intensely and so out of context as to be creepy.

 

 

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