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  1. #1
    Atomic Punk
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    12.11.17 @ 04:37 PM
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    Default Police: Mexican Cartels Give OK to Hit U.S. Targets

    EL PASO, Texas — Security is being heightened along the southern U.S. border because of a threat that warring Mexican cartels may send hit men into the United States, authorities said Monday.

    Law enforcement officials would not discuss specific security measures being taken at the ports of entry, along the border or in the city of El Paso, Texas.

    "We received credible information that drug cartels in Mexico have given permission to hit targets on the U.S. side of the border," El Paso police spokesman Officer Chris Mears said.

    Authorities learned of the threat last week.

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection Chief Officer Rick Lopez said: "CBP is on heightened alert ever since we became aware of the threats in Mexico."

    U.S. Border Patrol spokesman Doug Mosier said officials "are reinforcing the importance of vigilance."

    Drug cartel violence has claimed thousands of lives in Mexico this year. Nearly 800 people have been killed in Ciudad Juarez, a hardscrabble city of about 1.3 million people across the Rio Grande from El Paso.

    The cartels, battling one another and the Mexican government for supremacy and control of lucrative drug and human smuggling routes, have become brazen in their attacks in recent months.

    In Juarez this month, masked gunmen stormed a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center and killed eight people. Days later, Red Cross workers stopped treating gunshot victims for several hours after receiving death threats over Red Cross radios. The Red Cross had already stopped responding to emergency calls after 10 p.m. because of security concerns.

    Law enforcement officials this year in New Mexico and Texas said they had received a purported cartel hit list identifying 15 to 20 potential targets in those states. Mears said the latest threat contained no specific targets.

    The deadly wave of shootings and a rise in kidnappings for ransom in Mexico has prompted some of its citizens, including police officers and a prosecutor, to seek asylum in the U.S.

    While the ongoing cartel war has been largely contained in Mexico, more than two dozen gunshot victims have been taken for medical treatment in El Paso, prompting security lockdowns at the county hospital.

    Lopez said agents working at the ports, where those gunshot victims have been taken before coming into the U.S., are taking extra security precautions. Ambulances transporting gunshot victims are already being escorted by local law enforcement to the hospital, he said.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  2. #2
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    Hit men kill 5 at family gathering in Mexico
    Tue Aug 26, 6:24 PM ET

    CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (Reuters) - Suspected drug hitmen burst onto a ranch in northern Mexico and opened fire on a family gathering, killing five people in the third big attack in Chihuahua state this month.

    The gunmen fired on the ranch near the sleepy rural town of Aldama in Chihuahua state on Monday evening, shooting the men, including two brothers and an elderly man, in the head, the state attorney general's office said on Tuesday.

    The killings were believed to be part of a drug feud as gangs fight over smuggling routes into the United States.

    Drug hitmen killed 13 people including a baby at a family party in the tourist town of Creel in Chihuahua state this month.

    In another attack on a drug rehabilitation center in Chihuahua's border city of Ciudad Juarez, hooded gunmen killed eight patients during a prayer session.

    More than 2,300 people have died this year in Mexico's drug war, mostly between rival gangs, in a fight for control of smuggling corridors into California, Arizona and Texas.

    Drug violence is intensifying and gangs are ever more brazen despite the deployment of 25,000 troops and federal police across Mexico by President Felipe Calderon.

    Mexico's most-wanted man, Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, is fighting local drug baron Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, boss of the Juarez cartel, for control of Chihuahua state and its smuggling routes.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  3. #3
    Hang 'Em High Hurricane Halen's Avatar
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    12.16.17 @ 06:49 AM
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    Don't do drugs............won't get shot!!

    HH<---Bring your Taco eatin ass's across that border and come get you some of this U.S. ass kicking that's coming your way!! (Having a Toby Keith moment or something...... )
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  4. #4
    Atomic Punk edwardv's Avatar
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    12.15.17 @ 05:43 PM
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    Very disturbing.......

  5. #5
    Atomic Punk Viking's Avatar
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    12.14.17 @ 03:26 PM
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Halen View Post
    Don't do drugs............won't get shot!!

    HH<---Bring your Taco eatin ass's across that border and come get you some of this U.S. ass kicking that's coming your way!! (Having a Toby Keith moment or something...... )
    Amen to that brother!
    "Viking - last to sleep, first to rise, last to leave, that's how the Nords of old rocked the house." ~ timmac in the 'Texas Linkers' thread talking about yours truly. :-)

  6. #6
    Atomic Punk
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    12.11.17 @ 04:37 PM
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    TIJUANA, Mexico - The bodies of 11 men and one woman, some with their tongues cut out, were found dumped in an empty lot next to a Tijuana elementary school Monday morning, an hour before children were scheduled to arrive.

    City officials suspended classes after finding the victims, most of whom had been bound and tortured. Some were only partially clothed, said Baja California attorney general's office spokesman Jose Manuel Yepiz.

    Baja California state attorney General Romel Moreno said seven of the victims had their tongues cut out. He said a plastic bag containing five human tongues was also found near the bodies.

    "We're in a war," Moreno told a news conference late Monday. "We're in a constant battle."

    Moreno said at least three of the victims were teenagers. He said the federal attorney general's office has taken over the investigation.

    Yepiz said the 12 bodies were discovered next to a message written on a white piece of cardboard that read, "This is going to happen to all of those who are with 'The Engineer' for being blabbermouths."

    Minutes after the grisly discovery, four other bodies were found in another empty lot in Tijuana, and two other bodies were discovered late Sunday in a lot next to a factory.

    Investigators believe 16 of the victims were killed by warring drug gangs. The other two were victims of street crime, Yepiz said.

    He said police also found a message with the four bodies found in an empty lot in a residential area that read, "I'm not a traitor but I don't like to be with in the company of cowards."

    Victor Clark Alfaro, director of the Binational Center for Human Rights, said the killings come as the Arellano Felix cartel suffers internal strife and seeks to fend off Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman's push into the region.

    Tijuana is among the cities hardest hit by violence as Mexico's drug cartels battle for lucrative smuggling routes past the border to supply illegal drug users in the United States.

    Nearly two years ago, President Felipe Calderon launched a nationwide battle to take back territory controlled by some of the world's most powerful drug gangs, and the cartels have responded with unprecedented violence.

    The violence has battered Tijuana's once-boisterous tourist economy, silencing discos and shops.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  7. #7
    Sinner's Swing!
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    Quote Originally Posted by voivod View Post
    TIJUANA, Mexico - The bodies of 11 men and one woman, some with their tongues cut out, were found dumped in an empty lot next to a Tijuana elementary school Monday morning, an hour before children were scheduled to arrive.
    I've been in TJ for the past 4 weeks working. Talk about a shit hole. On Monday, when they found those bodies, there was all sorts of police sirens going past the place I was working at. Didn't here about the bodies until later but there was obviously something wrong.

    Saw in the news that there were some more bodies found today at a shopping mall about a mile from where I've been working. Glad to be home. Not looking forward to going back there in two weeks.

    The Mexican govt' is now inspecting 1 in 10 cars going into Mexico as they are blaming the U.S. for these cartels getting their guns. It usually takes 2 hours to get from Tijuana to San Diego. Now it's take 2 hours going the other way as well.
    Last edited by looper_guy; 10.04.08 at 08:40 PM.

  8. #8
    Atomic Punk
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    Quote Originally Posted by voivod View Post
    EL PASO, Texas — Security is being heightened along the southern U.S. border because of a threat that warring Mexican cartels may send hit men into the United States, authorities said Monday.

    Law enforcement officials would not discuss specific security measures being taken at the ports of entry, along the border or in the city of El Paso, Texas.

    "We received credible information that drug cartels in Mexico have given permission to hit targets on the U.S. side of the border," El Paso police spokesman Officer Chris Mears said.
    six months later....


    Mexican drug violence spills over into the US. Just as government officials had feared, the drug violence raging in Mexico is spilling over into the United States.

    U.S. authorities are reporting a spike in killings, kidnappings and home invasions connected to Mexico's murderous cartels. And to some policymakers' surprise, much of the violence is happening not in towns along the border, where it was assumed the bloodshed would spread, but a considerable distance away, in places such as Phoenix and Atlanta.

    Investigators fear the violence could erupt elsewhere around the country because the Mexican cartels are believed to have set up drug-dealing operations all over the U.S., in such far-flung places as Anchorage, Alaska; Boston; and Sioux Falls, S.D.

    "The violence follows the drugs," said David Cuthbertson, agent in charge of the FBI's office in the border city of El Paso, Texas.

    The violence takes many forms: Drug customers who owe money are kidnapped until they pay up. Cartel employees who don't deliver the goods or turn over the profits are disciplined through beatings, kidnappings or worse. And drug smugglers kidnap illegal immigrants in clashes with human smugglers over the use of secret routes from Mexico.

    So far, the violence is nowhere near as grisly as the mayhem in Mexico, which has witnessed beheadings, assassinations of police officers and soldiers, and mass killings in which the bodies were arranged to send a message. But law enforcement officials worry the violence on this side could escalate.

    "They are capable of doing about anything," said Rusty Payne, a Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman in Washington. "When you are willing to chop heads off, put them in an ice chest and drop them off at a police precinct, or roll a head into a disco, put beheadings on YouTube as a warning," very little is off limits.

    In an apartment near Birmingham, Ala., police found five men with their throats slit in August. They had apparently been tortured with electric shocks before being killed in a murder-for-hire orchestrated by a Mexican drug organization over a drug debt of about $400,000.

    In Phoenix, 150 miles north of the Mexican border, police have reported a sharp increase in kidnappings and home invasions, with about 350 each year for the last two years, and say the majority were committed at the behest of the Mexican drug gangs.

    In June, heavily armed men stormed a Phoenix house and fired randomly, killing one person. Police believe it was the work of Mexican drug organizations.

    Authorities in Atlanta are also seeing an increase in drug-related kidnappings tied to Mexican cartels. Estimates of how many such crimes are being committed are hard to come by because many victims are connected to the cartels and unwilling to go to the police, said Rodney G. Benson, DEA agent in charge in Atlanta.

    Agents said they have rarely seen such brutality in the U.S. since the "Miami Vice" years of the 1980s, when Colombian cartels had the corner on the cocaine market in Florida.

    Last summer, Atlanta-area police found a Dominican man who had been beaten, bound, gagged and chained to a wall in a quiet, middle-class neighborhood in Lilburn, Ga. The 31-year-old Rhode Island resident owed $300,000 to Mexico's Gulf Cartel, Benson said. The Gulf Cartel, based in Matamoros just south of the Texas border, is one of the most ruthless of the Mexican organizations that deal drugs such as cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine and heroin.

    "He was shackled to a wall and one suspect had an AK-47. The guy was in bad shape," Benson said. "I have no doubt in my mind if that ransom wasn't paid, he was going to be killed."

    In July, Atlanta-area police shot and killed a suspected kidnapper while he was trying to pick up a $2 million ransom owed to his cartel bosses, Benson said.

    State and federal governments have sent millions of dollars to local law enforcement along the Mexican border to help fend off spillover drug crime. But investigators believe Arizona and Atlanta are seeing the worst of the violence because they are major drug distribution hubs thanks to their webs of interstate highways.

    In fact, drug officials have dubbed Atlanta "the new Southwest border," said Jack Killorin, a former federal drug agent and director of the Atlanta region's High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area task force.

    El Paso, population 600,000, is only a quarter-mile away from Mexico's Ciudad Juarez, which has seen open gun battles and 1,700 murders in the last year. But El Paso remains one of America's safest cities, something Cuthbertson said is probably a result of the huge law enforcement presence in town, including thousands of Border Patrol and customs agents.

    In the past year, more than 5,000 people have been killed across Mexico in a power struggle among Mexico's drug cartels and ferocious fighting between them and the Mexican government. The cartels have established operations in at least 230 U.S. cities, according to the Justice Department's National Drug Intelligence Center.

    Payne said the U.S. and Mexico are working together to pressure the warring cartels. Payne cited the extradition of high-level drug suspects — four members of the Arellano Felix cartel in Tijuana were brought to the U.S. in December — and the capture or killings of several other top cartel leaders across Mexico in the past year.

    "We have to make sure that we attack these criminal organizations at every level so that we are safer not only in Mexico and on the Southwest border, but here in the rest of the country," Payne said.

    While some Americans may feel victimized by the spillover of violence, others are contributing to it. Americans provide 95 percent of the weapons used by the cartel, according to U.S. authorities. And Americans are the cartels' best customers, sending an estimated $28.5 billion in drug-sale proceeds across the Mexico border each year.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  9. #9
    Hang 'Em High sickman's Avatar
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    12.16.17 @ 05:11 AM
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    And they want to sue that rancher who is stopping these people from entering our country. Unbelievable.
    I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass.

  10. #10
    Atomic Punk
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    07.24.11 @ 04:36 PM
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    it's such a mess down there and no easy fixes. Such a gorgeous country with nothing but absolute potential but locked into perhaps the most corrupt government of the last 100 years. Given all the resources they have, there's no reason why they shouldn't be thriving...goes to show you what bad people can do when they are in power.

  11. #11
    Good Enough wombattt's Avatar
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    05.23.17 @ 01:16 PM
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    sad to say, but this stuff has been going on for at least the last 5 years, and on a few occasions the violence has spilled over to the u.s. side of the border.
    "Always hopeful, yet discontent,
    He knows changes aren't permanent
    But change is!"

  12. #12
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    PHOENIX (Reuters) – Hit men dressed in fake police tactical gear burst into a home in Phoenix, rake it with gunfire and execute a man.

    Armed kidnappers snatch victims from cars and even a local shopping mall across the Phoenix valley for ransom, turning the sun-baked city into the "kidnap capital" of the United States.

    Violence of this kind is common in Mexico where drug cartel abductions and executions are a daily feature of a raging drug war that claimed 6,000 lives south of the border last year.

    But U.S. authorities now fear that violent crime is beginning to bleed over the porous Mexico border and take hold here.

    "The fight in Mexico is about domination of the smuggling corridors and those corridors don't stop at the border," Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard said.

    Execution style murders, violent home invasions, and a spiraling kidnap rate in Phoenix -- where police reported an average of one abduction a day last year linked to Mexican crime -- are not the only examples along the border.

    In southern California, police have investigated cases of Americans abducted by armed groups tied to the Tijuana drug trade. One involved a businesswoman and her teenage daughter snatched in San Diego last year and held to ransom south of the border.

    In south Texas, a live hand grenade traced back to a Mexican cartel stash was tossed onto the pool table of a bar frequented by off-duty police officers in January. The pin was left in it and the assailant fled.

    COPING WITH SPILLOVER

    Mexican traffickers have always been violent, but the death toll has soared since President Felipe Calderon took office in late 2006 and sent tens of thousands of troops to fight the country's powerful cocaine cartels.

    Soldiers have fought pitched battles with drug gangs in several Mexican towns and overwhelmed police officers have fled municipal forces the length of the border. In many cases, police officers have been paid off by the drug gangs or even joined them.

    In a sign of an increasingly desperate struggle to rein in the violence, Calderon this week ordered 5,000 more troops and federal police to Ciudad Juarez, just across the border from El Paso, Texas.

    The cartels have killed 250 people in Ciudad Juarez in the past month, forced the police chief to resign, and shut down the airport with bomb threats.

    The struggle by outgunned Mexican authorities to contain the violence was highlighted for Arizona state police last November, when Mexican police officers pinned down in a raging gun battle in Nogales, Sonora, reached out to them with an urgent request for more bullets.

    While U.S. authorities stress they have not seen anything like the kind of street battles and horrific beheadings that are now common in Mexico, they are already taking action to curb was has become known as "overspill".

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry says he wants 1,000 troops to guard the border. The state's Attorney General Greg Abbott is backing legislation to crack down on money laundering and human, drug and weapons trafficking through the state by the warring Gulf and Sinaloa cartels.

    Lawmakers in Arizona heard testimony on border violence last week from police and prosecutors, who are seeking more robust measures to seize smugglers' assets, as well as cracking down harder on gunrunning to Mexico.

    PLANNING FOR THE WORST

    Washington has stepped up support for Calderon, pledging to give Mexico helicopters, surveillance aircraft, inspection equipment and police training under a $1.4 billion plan to beat the cartels in Mexico and Central America.

    Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano -- a former Arizona governor -- told a Congressional hearing last week she was focused on curbing the southbound traffic in guns that are being used to arm the violent cartels.

    In a measure of that commitment, a Phoenix gun dealer goes on trial next week on charges he sold hundreds of weapons, including AK-47 assault rifles, to smugglers knowing they would send them to a powerful cartel in Sinaloa state on Mexico's Pacific coast.

    As the spiraling drug violence shakes Mexican cities and towns along the U.S. border, U.S. Senate lawmakers announced last week they would hold two hearings to assess the ability of U.S. security forces to deal with the rise in crime on the U.S. side.

    Senator Joseph Lieberman, chairman of the homeland security governmental affairs committee, said the panel would assess border security programs already in place and review whether federal, state and local authorities are ready to respond to any serious spillover of the Mexican drugs war.

    For the sheriff of Hidalgo County, in south Texas, where the live grenade was thrown into a bar in Pharr, possibly by street gang members armed by a Mexican cartel, that renewed attention to the war on his doorstep can only be welcome.

    "It's the first time we've had a hand grenade attack," Guadalupe Trevino told Reuters. "I believe there's more out there that we need to find."
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  13. #13
    Eruption Naked Wake's Avatar
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    12.11.17 @ 12:57 PM
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    these articles all seem to give the notion that these Mexican Cartels are targeting innocent people. Can anyone confirm or deny this?

  14. #14
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    12.16.17 @ 06:39 AM
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Halen View Post
    Don't do drugs............won't get shot!!
    YUP!!!

    It also wouldn't hurt to put up a HUGE electric fence along the whole border. That and a few thousand extremely well armed American Soldiers...

    Problem solved.
    "The less I needed, the better I felt." ~ Charles Bukowski.

  15. #15
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    there were a couple stories on tv about this over the weekend. They always talk about the mexicans bringing in drugs to sell to our "children." No one wants to talk about the fact that "our children" are BUYING. It's simple economics. The same rules we apply to oranges, oatmeal and home electronics apply to coke, meth and pot. If there wasn't a market for it, it wouldn't be imported....and let's face it, there's a HELL OF A LOT more ADULTS buying this shit that our precious innocent children. The US has an unquenchable thirst for narcotics. Plain and simple. If we weren't buying. There wouldn't be anyone to sell to. They'd peddle their wares elsewhere.

    Wanna cut the cartels off at the knees? Legalize. Remove the necessity to do business underground. Remove the risk involved in trafficking which would grossly decrease the price of all these products. Let's not ignore the fact that those cartels are using US guns and US cash to wage their war. This isn't a Mexican issue. The Mexicans didn't get the US population hooked on anything. The US population needs a supplier, the Mexican cartels are filling that void.

 

 

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