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  1. #1
    Atomic Punk
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    Default 16-year-old drops out of school to play Guitar Hero



    'Guitar Hero' whiz aiming higher

    It's a small plastic thing, resembling a guitar in basic appearance only.
    But Blake Peebles brings energy to the room when he slides the strap over his skinny shoulder and steps atop the wooden box that serves as a stage.


    As the music begins, Blake quickly presses buttons on the guitar in time to a speed-metal tune blasting from the giant TV. It is an odd sensation, to watch a young man control the sounds of a rock song with a toy instrument, but this is "Guitar Hero," one of the most popular video game franchises in recent memory. Blake is one of the better players in the country.

    Other than his fingers, Blake barely moves while playing. His feet are set in place and his eyes are locked on the screen as he peers through a mop of curly brown hair. Gaming for him is serious business. It's his job.

    Among the prizes he's won playing "Guitar Hero" tournaments: gift certificates, gaming equipment and chicken sandwiches.

    Blake is 16, resides in North Raleigh and lives to play video games. On this night, he's at the Fox and Hound in Raleigh's North Hills shopping district. It's the restaurant's regular Sunday "Guitar Hero" night, and Blake and his family have come to watch and play. His brother and sister are here, as are his mom and dad, an aunt and an uncle, some cousins and some friends.

    But in the end, it's not the people related to Blake who confirm his plastic-guitar prowess. It's the group of 20-somethings sitting at a nearby table, who applaud when Blake finishes playing along to "Through the Fire and Flames," viewed as the game's toughest song.

    "It's pretty sick," says Andrew Gambling, 27, who describes himself as a casual player. "He's talented."

    Blake is appreciative of the applause and grins shyly when it is mentioned to him. But he's not very happy with his score.

    "That's probably the worst I've ever done," he says, which seems impossible. The game moves at warp speed, so Blake's fingers do too.

    This is not a competitive environment, so the score hardly matters. But his attitude about it underscores some Peebles family truisms: Blake is so dedicated to gaming that his parents let him quit school so he can better concentrate on it.

    They pay for home tutors instead. Mom and Dad do this, even though there are very few people in this country who make their living playing competitive video games.

    Blake very much would like to be one of them, but a boy cannot live on chicken sandwiches alone.

    Leaving school

    Blake is the middle child of Mike and Hunter Peebles. Tucker is 18, an honor-roll student who plays football for North Raleigh Christian Academy. Caramy is 13, a dancer with a congenital disorder that causes developmental disabilities.

    Mike and Hunter do not believe in one-size-fits-all parenting.

    That is not to say that it was an easy decision for them to let Blake leave school last September. They would have preferred that he stay in high school with his brother. But he bugged them until they let him quit.

    "We couldn't take the complaining anymore," says Hunter. "He always told me that he thought school was a waste of time."

    Blake never gravitated toward sports or drama or any of the other traditional school-based activities. Just gaming.

    So they made a deal. Blake could leave school but would have to be tutored at home. In one respect, the arrangement is similar to what parents of gifted child athletes and actors have done for years.

    In another, those careers can bring big money. Competitive gaming is still growing. Major League Gaming, one of the field's top sanctioning bodies, holds tournaments in cities across the country.

    The company has more than 125 players signed to management deals. Top players can earn more than $80,000 a year, plus outside sponsorship money, says an MLG spokeswoman. The average pay is in the $20,000 to $30,000 range.

    Blake has done well in local tournaments, including one held at a Chick-fil-A that earned him 52 combo meals. By his account, he has lost only once since "Guitar Hero III" was released late last year. Some of that time was spent playing online, against players from all over the world.

    This is how he knows he's good. It wasn't that long ago that kids who excelled at some activity, say basketball, would only have to go to the next neighborhood to have their dreams crushed by some older, more accomplished player.

    Today, on Xbox 360, players use the system's online component to compare scores with players all over the world. Blake, who goes by the online name "Dreminem," figures that he has top-10 scores on 20 or so of songs on "Guitar Hero III."

    He guesses that he's probably one of the top 15 or 20 players in the country.

    Blake so far has won about $1,000 in prizes in the months since he began competing in "Guitar Hero." His biggest challenge will come in mid-August, when father and son travel to California for the U.S. regionals of the World Cyber Games. Blake qualified to appear there after performing well online.

    If Blakes wins the regional, it's on to the national championship. The best "Guitar Hero III" players there will earn the right to represent the U.S. at the world tournament in Germany.

    Blake is happy with his success. Mom and Dad are happy with his grades. Since he's gone to the tutoring arrangement, she hasn't once had to tell him to do his homework, because he does it on his own. They got plenty of grief from family and friends about their decision at first, but they've also watched Blake, who is shy and disliked school, become a happier person.

    Set up to play

    Inside his upstairs bedroom, Blake's environment is set up specifically to make him a better gamer. There is a PlayStation 2, a Nintendo Wii and an Xbox 360. He also has a stack of plastic guitars, but no real ones. Blake doesn't play an actual guitar, a skill that doesn't really transfer to playing the virtual kind, anyway.

    The frame for his bed is on the back porch, with the box springs and mattress on the bedroom floor. That puts his bed at a more comfortable level for sitting to play "Guitar Hero III" for extended periods. At the moment, he plays just a few hours a day, but that number will increase as the California competition nears.

    Blake seems happy with his home school arrangement, as you would expect from a teenager who is allowed to stay up into the wee hours to play video games. Sometimes, when Mike heads to the gym before 5 a.m., his son is still playing video games. Blake calls it working "the late shift."

    He didn't enjoy school, he says, and especially didn't like the rules associated with attending the Christian academy. Shaggy hair is more his style.

    He's good at video games. "I wasn't really good at anything else that I liked."

    His "Guitar Hero" skills certainly have impressed the local gaming community.

    "He's amazing," says Mike Gibson, the good-natured owner of two local Play N Trade Video Games stores. "I can't have tournaments for that anymore. I might as well just give him the prize."

    Blake dreams of making a living playing games, and scoring a contract with Major League Gaming.

    But Terry Lindle, aka Terry15, knows how tough it can be to make it. Lindle, 23, lives in Illinois and has been a competitive gamer for about eight years. He won the national championship for "Halo 2" in 2005 and traveled to England earlier this year to compete in a world championship for the game "F.E.A.R."

    Lindle came in sixth and won $4,500. He estimates that he has earned about $25,000 in his years of gaming.

    "When you want to go somewhere with this gaming stuff, you've got to be in the top 1 percent," he says.

    Lindle is impressed that Blake qualified for the tournament in California. But in gaming, coming in third or fourth doesn't mean much.

    "You've got to win these major tournaments, otherwise you don't get noticed by advertisers and sponsors."

    Lindle believes there's a future to competitive gaming, one in which more people can make more money. He points to Major League Gaming's recent deal with ESPN, which includes live-streaming tournaments on ESPN360.com.

    Right now, Blake is concentrating on "Guitar Hero," working to get the "Dreminem" name out there. "Guitar Hero" isn't a big money game on the tournament circuit, as most of the cash goes to the people who play "Halo 3."

    Blake is biding his time to the next big thing, so he can get ahead of the curve.

    "The next big game that comes out, I'm just going to focus on that one," he says.

    And why not? The guy is self-employed. He sets his own hours.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  2. #2
    Emperor of VHLinks.com Brett's Avatar
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    12.15.17 @ 09:28 PM
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    One of the most pathetic things I've ever read...seriously.
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  3. #3
    Sinner's Swing! twonabomber's Avatar
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    12.08.16 @ 03:21 AM
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    dumb shit kid and even dumber shit parents.
    "is this a good show tonight, or fuckin' what?" - DLR, Montreal, 11/10/07

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  4. #4
    Atomic Punk Menlow's Avatar
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    06.14.17 @ 06:46 PM
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    To this day I wish my mom had let me become a professional Frogger player.

  5. #5
    Atomic Punk chefcraig's Avatar
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    So what? The kid will briefly make a few K then end up as what, a former "once was" in the gaming industry? Doesn't he realize there are currently 3 year olds out there actively in training?

    This shit is really weird sounding to me. I mean, yeah...I was a bastard at "Air Hockey", ya know? I was also quite good at "Submarine Command" or whatever this thing below was called, yet shit...I never thought about taking the act on the road as a way of making a living sometime in the mid-seventies...



    Eeww...I can just imagine kids coming up to me later in life: "I remember when you ruled at that game, craig..." as I serve them their Whopper w/cheese...
    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
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  6. #6
    Sinner's Swing! Darkstar's Avatar
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    12.04.14 @ 11:23 PM
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    Shit, if my parents had followed that trend when I was growing up I'd of ended up being a professional masturbator.........
    Love should NOT be work, it should be as easy as breathing Dave's Dreidel

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  7. #7
    Atomic Punk
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    His parents haven't figured out that the economy has yet to hit bottom . The pro-gaming circuit exists only because of a still-healthy video game industry but that's also going to take a hit eventually.

    Dumb.
    "Nothing is ever what it seems but everything is exactly what it is." - B. Banzai


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  8. #8
    Hot For Teacher mike-o's Avatar
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    This just might be the lamest thing ever

  9. #9
    Sinner's Swing! graeme's Avatar
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    11.19.17 @ 09:41 AM
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    I tend to agree with all the above comments. I've never owned a playstation or xbox or whatever (though they look like fun) but I do remember reading this article a few years back.

    Don't Tell the Kids:
    Computer Games
    Can Make You Rich
    Players in South Korea Do It
    Full Time, and Lucky Few
    Have Six-Figure Incomes
    By MEI FONG
    Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    May 21, 2004

    SEOUL, South Korea -- At age 24, Lim Yo-Hwan plays computer games all day, makes a six-figure income doing it and has thousands of adoring fans.

    Computer games have become a spectator sport here, and Mr. Lim is a star. In a packed Seoul television studio recently, Mr. Lim stood combat-ready in a military-style white tunic with epaulettes, his spiky hairdo set off by shiny silver headphones. Tapping frantically at a keyboard, Mr. Lim built a virtual empire and launched a daring attack on enemy forces in an imaginary electronic galaxy -- and was defeated -- all within five minutes.

    Broadcast on cable TV, his moves were also displayed on screen before 300 fans in the studio, who cheered, cried and smacked noisemakers to show support. "I never miss a match" of his, said Jung Eun-young, 28, who stood in line for 14 hours for her front-row seat.

    As electronic games attract big-dollar deals with sports leagues, Hollywood and advertisers, more gamers are starting to face off in professional venues. The payoffs are particularly rich here in Korea, where there's enough commercial and cultural support for a community of pros to earn a living and maybe even get rich.

    Three Korean cable TV channels broadcast matches 24 hours a day. Live matches take place every week here in Seoul, and are draw as many customers as movies. This gaming mecca is even drawing young men from all over the world, who are lured by prospects of fame and fortune.

    Last year, Mr. Lim made about $300,000 from player fees and commercials. Another top earner, Hung Jin-Ho, whose fingers are insured for $60,000, recently signed a three-year deal with telecom provider KTF Co. that will pay him $480,000 altogether.

    Computer games began taking off in Korea five years ago when the government rolled out a nationwide high-speed Internet system. Instead of buying expensive consoles or handheld games, which weren't widely available here then, teens began facing off on the Internet.

    Companies ranging from Samsung Electronics to Coca-Cola Co. started sponsoring tournaments, and some even adopted teams. Now there's a formal system to identify and groom potential champions by coaches and talent spotters under the auspices of the Korean Pro-Gamers Association. Sponsored pros like Mr. Lim live together as teams and practice as strenuously as martial arts devotees do.

    'Work, Not Fun'

    "It's work, not fun," says Mr. Lim, who trains 10 hours a day with his eight teammates and their coach in a two-bedroom apartment, where they also live, in southern Seoul. His team, called T1, recently switched sponsors from California chip maker Advanced Micro Devices to South Korea's biggest telecom provider, SK Telecom. They are planning to buy a van and move to a bigger apartment.

    The team competes in Starcraft, a game of strategy that's like a combination of high-speed chess and Risk. Players control one of three alien species in a computer-generated universe, attempting to gather resources, build weapons and annihilate the enemy. Matches generally last about 15 minutes.

    The team apartment is nearly bare, with some pizza boxes and a bank of computers where the players spend most of their waking hours. Mr. Lim rolls out a mattress to sleep on and keeps most of his clothes in boxes and bags. His team uniform and other clothes for public appearances are made of crease-free nylon.

    Like most serious gamers, Mr. Lim plays through much of the night and sleeps most of the day. He used to play basketball but stopped about two years ago for fear of hurting his fingers, which have to move fast to win tournaments. A measure pro-gamers use to gauge ability is APM, or actions per minute. APM is the average number of maneuvers a player can execute in 60 seconds. In Starcraft, most casual players have an APM of between 50 and 70. Mr. Lim has been known to hit 400 APM at some games, or 6.66 moves per second.

    At that speed, calculation and instinct merge, resulting in moves that fans insist are nothing less than art. Starcraft devotees study Mr. Lim's moves as chess players study Garry Kasparov. A DVD detailing Mr. Lim's winning plays sold 30,000 copies in South Korea last year, outselling the movie "Matrix Revolutions."

    Some female fans want to date Mr. Lim, while others want to mother him. His refrigerator is stuffed with vats of homemade kimchi, the fiery Korean pickled vegetables. His walls are hung with dainty cross-stitch samplers, and his bathroom crammed with skin-care products, all gifts. He has a fan club with 470,000 registered members, but for the past two years he hasn't had a girlfriend. His fame makes it hard for him to risk rejection by approaching girls, he says: "It's too embarrassing." Also, team rules bar him from bringing dates back to the apartment.

    Five years ago, most Starcraft players were just teens playing for fun. The rapid growth of cybercafés, called PC baangs, where players congregate and compete, helped popularize the game. A producer at the Korean cartoon network Tooniverse noticed that people were tuning in to telecasts of amateur gaming tournaments that the network occasionally screened, and persuaded his bosses to finance a channel devoted exclusively to televising computer games.

    Players in Costume

    The producer, Hyung Jun Hwang, hired well-known sports commentators and encouraged them to be outrageous. He put players in costumes resembling Batman's, though players have since come up with their own uniform designs, choosing looks ranging from silver, Star Trek-inspired jumpsuits to Navy dress whites.

    Viewership on the network has climbed from 3 million households in 2000 to 6.5 million last year. Companies like Coca Cola Co., Olympus Corp. and Gillette Co., took turns sponsoring three-month-long tournaments, paying $400,000 each. This year, SK Telecom, South Korea's biggest telecom company, paid $1.5 million to sponsor a nine-month tournament, called Sky League.

    The young sport has quickly become hypercompetitive. The Korean Pro-Gamer's Association has 170 members, though only about 50 make enough to support themselves, earning on average $20,000-$30,000. Fewer than 10 make six-figures, the KGPA estimates.

    Somewhere on the lower rungs is Australian Peter Neate, 23, a computer science major who dropped out of Griffith University in Queensland to try making it as a pro-gamer in Seoul. He makes $300 a month now, less than what fast-food workers earn in his native Brisbane. Roommate Sang Hoe, 19, earns nothing but gets free room and board in exchange for being a practice partner and the team gofer. "He's lucky," says team manager Daniel Lee. "I have to turn away a lot of kids."

    Canadian Guillaume Patry, who was the top-rated player four years ago, hasn't won a major game in well over a year. He made $100,000 a year at his peak but is now living on his savings. He's casting about for new ventures and has set up an e-commerce business. It's difficult to keep up the wearing training routine, says the 21-year-old. Starcraft, he says, is "a young man's game."
    A man could lose himself in a country like this.

    My blog at http://tollins.blogspot.de/

  10. #10
    Baluchitherium
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    this kinda shit makes me weep.
    as a parent myself i want my kids to make a possitive effect on society, ya know the kinda thing, cure cancer, find peace in the middle east or whatever. i know that they will probably grow up and get normal everyday jobs but they have dream carrears which i hope they fulfill. but if any of them came to me wishing to drop out of school and waste their lives playing a video game that really serves no purpose in the scale of things then im affraid i would throw out their xbox and send the to a boarding school.
    the kids parents seriously need to think about the kids future and not just a short lived stream of $$$
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  11. #11
    Atomic Punk Raldo's Avatar
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    12.15.17 @ 10:50 AM
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    Get your ass in school!!!
    Remember the Heroes - 9/11/01

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  12. #12
    Atomic Punk WinterlessIceness's Avatar
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    Umm... You know, my parents had been constantly tell me to get my ass in school while I wanted to play real guitar and make a living of it. Real guitar, x-box guitar - whatever. People in the early 20s/30s would have been equally outraged at all those Van Halens/Guns and Roses/blah blah if they knew how much entertainment would dominate everything else.

    I personally don't care. It's not my kid, nor my friend or anyone I know. He can do whatever the fuck he wants.

  13. #13
    Hot For Teacher
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    ...Not to play real guitar.
    I'm cool.

  14. #14
    Atomic Punk
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    07.24.11 @ 04:36 PM
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    Jonny Lang's parents yanked him out of school and got him tutors and home schooled him so school wouldn't interfere with his guitar playing and as such focus on his career.

    Most, if not ALL, of the gymnasts we see on the olympics have the same set up.

    Video games are a new frontier of sorts and there is an economy building up around them. So the kid's parents have the cash to drop on letting the little bastard stay home and play guitar hero. I wish I could have done that to play real guitar. I hated going to school and saw it as nothing but a waste of time. I'd have loved to home school the way my younger sister got too. By doing that she had the opportunity to concentrate on piano and ballet and had a lot more time for social activities that meant something to her instead of going through the paces in a classroom. Home schooling doesn't equal dropping out and becoming a loser for the rest of your life.

    Not my kid, not my parents, doesn't really affect me in the least. If he and his parents are smart, he'll still graduate and if he doesn't make it gaming perhaps he can make it in the gaming industry as a game designer or working for one of the companies...or he'll just live at mom and dad's house forever while working parttime at Gamestop...who really gives a shit?

  15. #15
    Atomic Punk ZeoBandit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett View Post
    One of the most pathetic things I've ever read...seriously.
    You can say that again. What a loser. We'll see how he feels about this decision in 5 years when he is homeless and begging for food on the street.
    "What we are dealing with here, is a complete lack of respect for the law" - Jackie Gleason, Smokey and the Bandit

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