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  1. #1
    Atomic Punk
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    Default "People come back from war different,"

    LEEDS, Mass. - Peter Mohan traces the path from the Iraqi battlefield to this lifeless conference room, where he sits in a kilt and a Camp Kill Yourself T-shirt and calmly describes how he became a sad cliche: a homeless veteran.


    Veteran of the Afghan and Iraq wars Peter Mohan, right, hugs Vietnam veteran Robert Whitfield, of Haydenville, Mass., left, in a hallway at a veterans homeless shelter, in Leeds, Mass., Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2007. Whitfield is a Veterans Administration employee.

    There was a happy homecoming, but then an accident — car crash, broken collarbone. And then a move east, close to his wife's new job but away from his best friends.

    And then self-destruction: He would gun his motorcycle to 100 mph and try to stand on the seat. He would wait for his wife to leave in the morning, draw the blinds and open up whatever bottle of booze was closest.

    He would pull out his gun, a .45-caliber, semiautomatic pistol. He would lovingly clean it, or just look at it and put it away. Sometimes place it in his mouth.

    "I don't know what to do anymore," his wife, Anna, told him one day. "You can't be here anymore."

    Peter Mohan never did find a steady job after he left Iraq. He lost his wife — a judge granted their divorce this fall — and he lost his friends and he lost his home, and now he is here, in a shelter.

    He is 28 years old. "People come back from war different," he offers by way of a summary.

    This is not a new story in America: A young veteran back from war whose struggle to rejoin society has failed, at least for the moment, fighting demons and left homeless.

    But it is happening to a new generation. As the war in Afghanistan plods on in its seventh year, and the war in Iraq in its fifth, a new cadre of homeless veterans is taking shape.

    And with it come the questions: How is it that a nation that became so familiar with the archetypal homeless, combat-addled Vietnam veteran is now watching as more homeless veterans turn up from new wars?

    What lessons have we not learned? Who is failing these people? Or is homelessness an unavoidable byproduct of war, of young men and women who devote themselves to serving their country and then see things no man or woman should?

    For as long as the United States has sent its young men — and later its young women — off to war, it has watched as a segment of them come home and lose the battle with their own memories, their own scars, and wind up without homes.

    The Civil War produced thousands of wandering veterans. Frequently addicted to morphine, they were known as "tramps," searching for jobs and, in many cases, literally still tending their wounds.

    More than a decade after the end of World War I, the "Bonus Army" descended on Washington — demanding immediate payment on benefits that had been promised to them, but payable years later — and were routed by the U.S. military.

    And, most publicly and perhaps most painfully, there was Vietnam: Tens of thousands of war-weary veterans, infamously rejected or forgotten by many of their own fellow citizens.

    Now it is happening again, in small but growing numbers.

    For now, about 1,500 veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan have been identified by the Department of Veterans Affairs. About 400 of them have taken part in VA programs designed to target homelessness.

    The 1,500 are a small, young segment of an estimated 336,000 veterans in the United States who were homeless at some point in 2006, the most recent year for which statistics are available, according to the National Alliance to End Homelessness.

    Still, advocates for homeless veterans use words like "surge" and "onslaught" and even "tsunami" to describe what could happen in the coming years, as both wars continue and thousands of veterans struggle with post-traumatic stress.

    People who have studied postwar trauma say there is always a lengthy gap between coming home — the time of parades and backslaps and "The Boys Are Back in Town" on the local FM station — and the moments of utter darkness that leave some of them homeless.

    In that time, usually a period of years, some veterans focus on the horrors they saw on the battlefield, or the friends they lost, or why on earth they themselves deserved to come home at all. They self-medicate, develop addictions, spiral down.

    How — or perhaps the better question is why — is this happening again?

    "I really wish I could answer that question," says Anthony Belcher, an outreach supervisor at New Directions, which conducts monthly sweeps of Skid Row in Los Angeles, identifying homeless veterans and trying to help them get over addictions.

    "It's the same question I've been asking myself and everyone around me. I'm like, wait, wait, hold it, we did this before. I don't know how our society can allow this to happen again."

    Mental illness, financial troubles and difficulty in finding affordable housing are generally accepted as the three primary causes of homelessness among veterans, and in the case of Iraq and Afghanistan, the first has raised particular concern.

    Iraq veterans are less likely to have substance abuse problems but more likely to suffer mental illness, particularly post-traumatic stress, according to the Veterans Administration. And that stress by itself can trigger substance abuse.

    Some advocates say there are also some factors particular to the Iraq war, like multiple deployments and the proliferation of improvised explosive devices, that could be pulling an early trigger on stress disorders that can lead to homelessness.

    While many Vietnam veterans began showing manifestations of stress disorders roughly 10 years after returning from the front, Iraq and Afghanistan veterans have shown the signs much earlier.

    That could also be because stress disorders are much better understood now than they were a generation ago, advocates say.

    "There's something about going back, and a third and a fourth time, that really aggravates that level of stress," said Michael Blecker, executive director of Swords to Plowshares," a San Francisco homeless-vet outreach program.

    "And being in a situation where you have these IEDs, everywhere's a combat zone. There's no really safe zone there. I think that all is just a stew for post-traumatic stress disorder."
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. -- Gen. George S. Patton

  2. #2
    Atomic Punk
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    Others point to something more difficult to define, something about American culture that while celebrating and honoring troops in a very real way upon their homecoming ultimately forgets them.

    This is not necessarily due to deliberate negligence. Perhaps because of the lingering memory of Vietnam, when troops returned from an unpopular war to face open hostility, many Americans have taken care to express support for the troops even as they solidly disapprove of the war in Iraq.

    But it remains easy for veterans home from Iraq for several years, and teetering on the edge of losing a job or home, to slip into the shadows. And as their troubles mount, they often feel increasingly alienated from friends and family members.

    "War changes people," says John Driscoll, vice president for operations and programs at the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans. "Your trust in people is strained. You've been separated from loved ones and friends. The camaraderie between troops is very extreme, and now you feel vulnerable."

    The VA spends about $265 million annually on programs targeting homeless veterans. And as Iraq and Afghanistan veterans face problems, the VA will not simply "wait for 10 years until they show up," Pete Dougherty, the VA's director of homeless programs, said when the new figures were released.

    "We're out there now trying to get everybody we can to get those kinds of services today, so we avoid this kind of problem in the future," he said.

    These are all problems defined in broad strokes, but they cascade in very real and acute ways in the lives of individual veterans.

    Take Mike Lally. He thinks back now to the long stretches in the stifling Iraq heat, nothing to do but play Spades and count flies, and about the day insurgents killed the friendly shop owner who sold his battalion Pringles and candy bars.

    He thinks about crouching in the back of a Humvee watching bullets crash into fuel tanks during his first firefight, and about waiting back at base for the vodka his mother sent him, dyed blue and concealed in bottles of Scope mouthwash.

    It was a little maddening, he supposes, every piece of it, but Lally is fairly sure that what finally cracked him was the bodies. Unloading the dead from ambulances and loading them onto helicopters. That was his job.

    "I guess I loaded at least 20," he says. "Always a couple at a time. And you knew who it was. You always knew who it was."

    It was in 2004, when he came back from his second tour in Iraq with the Marine Corps, that his own bumpy ride down began.

    He would wake up at night, sweating and screaming, and during the days he imagined people in the shadows a state the professionals call hypervigilence and Mike Lally calls "being on high alert, all the time."

    His father-in-law tossed him a job installing vinyl siding, but the stress overcame him, and Lally began to drink. A little rum in his morning coffee at first, and before he knew it he was drunk on the job, and then had no job at all.

    And now Mike Lally, still only 26 years old, is here, booted out of his house by his wife, padding around in an old T-shirt and sweats at a Leeds shelter called Soldier On, trying to get sober and perhaps, on a day he can envision but not yet grasp, get his home and family and life back.

    "I was trying to live every day in a fog," he says, reflecting between spits of tobacco juice. "I'd think I was back in there, see people popping out of windows. Any loud noise would set me off. It still does."

    Soldier On is staffed entirely by homeless veterans. A handful who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan, usually six or seven at a time, mix with dozens from Vietnam. Its president, Jack Downing, has spent nearly four decades working with addicts, the homeless and the mentally ill.

    Next spring, he plans to open a limited-equity cooperative in the western Massachusetts city of Pittsfield. Formerly homeless veterans will live there, with half their rents going into individual deposit accounts.

    Downing is convinced that ushering homeless veterans back into homeownership is the best way out of the pattern of homelessness that has repeated itself in an endless loop, war after war.

    "It's a disgrace," Downing says. "You have served your country, you get damaged, and you come back and we don't take care of you. And we make you prove that you need our services."

    "And how do you prove it?" he continues, voice rising in anger. "You prove it by regularly failing until you end up in a system where you're identified as a person in crisis. That has shocked me."

    Even as the nation gains a much better understanding of the types of post-traumatic stress disorders suffered by so many thousands of veterans even as it learns the lessons of Vietnam and tries to learn the lessons of Iraq it is probably impossible to foretell a day when young American men and women come home from wars unscarred.

    At least as long as there are wars.

    But Driscoll, at least, sees an opportunity to do much better.

    He notes that the VA now has more than 200 veteran adjustment centers to help ease the transition back into society, and the existence of more than 900 VA-connected community clinics nationwide.

    "We're hopeful that five years down the road, you're not going to see the same problems you saw after the Vietnam War," he says. "If we as a nation do the right thing by these guys."

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=17371565
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. -- Gen. George S. Patton

  3. #3
    Sinner's Swing! Bullwinkle's Avatar
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    "There's something about going back, and a third and a fourth time, that really aggravates that level of stress," said Michael Blecker, executive director of Swords to Plowshares," a San Francisco homeless-vet outreach program.

    Ya think?


    Let's hope the administration doesn't do something stupid like cut funding to the VA. They surely wouldn't do that, would they?







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  4. #4
    Atomic Punk chefcraig's Avatar
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    My brother returned from his tours of duty in Vietnam a completely changed person. It was truly horrible to watch his gradual decline into ill-heath, instability and yes, madness.

    And of course, his tragic to witness death.

    For this reason, I rarely (if ever) get involved in political threads that are engaged in around here, discussing military action and U.S. involvement in places such as the middle east. There is such a thing as a fate worse than death. In fact, those that die in wars in some ways are fortunate. And to tell you the honest truth, I sincerely do not give a fuck if you agree with that sentiment or not, as I have seen proof of it first hand. The recent embarrassment of veterans' shoddy and appallingly inept care at Walter Reed is a mere symptom of a severe problem this country faces regarding the treatment of it's military personnel. And after observing my brother's struggles with the V.A., it comes as absolutely no surprise that issues left unfixed from as far back as WWII are still extending themselves to yet another generation.

    There was a line uttered in an early episode of M.A.S.H. by actor Maclean Stevenson (as Col. Henry Blake) to an inconsolable Hawk-eye Pierce (Alan Alda) who had just lost a patient: "There are two rules in war...rule number one is that young men die. Rule number two is that doctors can not change rule number one."

    If only things were as cut and dried, as well as charmingly simple, in real life.
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  5. #5
    Sinner's Swing! Bullwinkle's Avatar
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    We return,
    We return from fighting,
    We return fighting.


    --W.E.B. DuBois







    Don't read this.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefcraig View Post
    My brother returned from his tours of duty in Vietnam a completely changed person. It was truly horrible to watch his gradual decline into ill-heath, instability and yes, madness.

    And of course, his tragic to witness death.

    For this reason, I rarely (if ever) get involved in political threads that are engaged in around here, discussing military action and U.S. involvement in places such as the middle east. There is such a thing as a fate worse than death. In fact, those that die in wars in some ways are fortunate. And to tell you the honest truth, I sincerely do not give a fuck if you agree with that sentiment or not, as I have seen proof of it first hand. The recent embarrassment of veterans' shoddy and appallingly inept care at Walter Reed is a mere symptom of a severe problem this country faces regarding the treatment of it's military personnel. And after observing my brother's struggles with the V.A., it comes as absolutely no surprise that issues left unfixed from as far back as WWII are still extending themselves to yet another generation.

    There was a line uttered in an early episode of M.A.S.H. by actor Maclean Stevenson (as Col. Henry Blake) to an inconsolable Hawk-eye Pierce (Alan Alda) who had just lost a patient: "There are two rules in war...rule number one is that young men die. Rule number two is that doctors can not change rule number one."

    If only things were as cut and dried, as well as charmingly simple, in real life.
    I hear you 100%. It is a disgrace to see how screwed up the system is for the people that sacrifice everything for this country. At this point, we can't count on the government. Everyone who is financially able, has time to donate, or has a specific skill, needs to step up to the plate and do what they can for our military and their families. To hell with this bloated, self serving government, we'll just have to help any way we can. There are many groups in most states already dedicated to this and they are doing a great service. I encourage everyone who can, to get involved, even if it is just a little. It will go a long way. Our military people are a unique breed, they don't really complain and they are proud of what they do. No matter what one's feelings are about war, you have to respect the heck out of these people.

  7. #7
    Sinner's Swing! Wickett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefcraig View Post
    My brother returned from his tours of duty in Vietnam a completely changed person. It was truly horrible to watch his gradual decline into ill-heath, instability and yes, madness.

    And of course, his tragic to witness death.

    For this reason, I rarely (if ever) get involved in political threads that are engaged in around here, discussing military action and U.S. involvement in places such as the middle east. There is such a thing as a fate worse than death. In fact, those that die in wars in some ways are fortunate. And to tell you the honest truth, I sincerely do not give a fuck if you agree with that sentiment or not, as I have seen proof of it first hand. The recent embarrassment of veterans' shoddy and appallingly inept care at Walter Reed is a mere symptom of a severe problem this country faces regarding the treatment of it's military personnel. And after observing my brother's struggles with the V.A., it comes as absolutely no surprise that issues left unfixed from as far back as WWII are still extending themselves to yet another generation.
    [/B]
    There was a line uttered in an early episode of M.A.S.H. by actor Maclean Stevenson (as Col. Henry Blake) to an inconsolable Hawk-eye Pierce (Alan Alda) who had just lost a patient: "There are two rules in war...rule number one is that young men die. Rule number two is that doctors can not change rule number one."

    If only things were as cut and dried, as well as charmingly simple, in real life.
    agreed.. How in the hell does the government (well, I guess that means us..) allow this to happen again????
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  8. #8
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    My brother spent 1 year in Iraq and he didn't allow it to affect how he acts, BUT he says he has a new understanding of how it could affect people. He said imagine going somewhere with the intent to kill someone and those same someones are intent on killing you. Then come home and just try to put it behind you. We should most certainly take care of our veterans better. My bro did come home with a stomach ailment that he cannot diagnose or get rid of and they just kinda let him out to dry. He saw 10 different doctors and specialists and none of them had a diagnosis. They just gave him high powered gas meds and that was that. bleeding out is not a gas problem. He refuses now to go see anyone medical wise.
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  9. #9
    Atomic Punk
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    Things are a little different today than in Vietnam. Back then when your tour was up you often went home the next day. One day you're in the jungle on patrol and the next day you're back home walking down main street.

    There was no decompression time.

    I know that the Army is coming around to reaching out to those with Post Traumatic Stress and getting them help while they are still in uniform because today they have a different kind of problem.

    Today you have 26 year olds who are going to see their FIFTH combat tour either in Iraq or Afghanistan. That's more than most Vietnam vets and even more than some WWII veterans.

    War sucks.
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    Baluchitherium
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    i served 2 tours in afganistan and 1 in iraq with the british armed forces (3rd parachute reg), during my tour in iraq we were ambushed and during the fight i lost 3 very good friends and was myself quite badly injured when an r.p.g. round exploded near my position. i was duly shipped to an army hospital and recieved several surgeries for my injuries (knee reconstruction and some for shrapnel) and then i was (for want of a better word) "kicked" out of the army (my knees were so mashed up i was unable to walk/march/run a great distance) and told to seek help with my rehabilitation through the n.h.s (the british national health service), this was fine for my physical injuries, i'm pretty much recovered, but the emotional scars it has left me with are another story i suffered from depression and post traumatic stress, i alienated my whole family and lost most of my friends, i started fighting in bars and eventualy was arrested (for starting a fight in a bar and braking someones arm). i found that the british army offers very little support for its ex soldiers who have been hurt in the line of duty just a bunch of phone numbers of people (quote) "you may like to talk to". it was only after speaking with other ex soldiers that i found the help i needed(and still do).
    when i was in america last week i noticed how proud you guys ae of all your verterans and even honoured them at seaworld brfore the killer whale show which i thought was wonderful, i just wish this country had this much pride, the british(armed forces) truly forgets its heros, both living or dead.
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  11. #11
    5150 YO!Edward's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommywho5150 View Post
    i served 2 tours in afganistan and 1 in iraq with the british armed forces (3rd parachute reg), during my tour in iraq we were ambushed and during the fight i lost 3 very good friends and was myself quite badly injured when an r.p.g. round exploded near my position. i was duly shipped to an army hospital and recieved several surgeries for my injuries (knee reconstruction and some for shrapnel) and then i was (for want of a better word) "kicked" out of the army (my knees were so mashed up i was unable to walk/march/run a great distance) and told to seek help with my rehabilitation through the n.h.s (the british national health service), this was fine for my physical injuries, i'm pretty much recovered, but the emotional scars it has left me with are another story i suffered from depression and post traumatic stress, i alienated my whole family and lost most of my friends, i started fighting in bars and eventualy was arrested (for starting a fight in a bar and braking someones arm). i found that the british army offers very little support for its ex soldiers who have been hurt in the line of duty just a bunch of phone numbers of people (quote) "you may like to talk to". it was only after speaking with other ex soldiers that i found the help i needed(and still do).
    when i was in america last week i noticed how proud you guys ae of all your verterans and even honoured them at seaworld brfore the killer whale show which i thought was wonderful, i just wish this country had this much pride, the british(armed forces) truly forgets its heros, both living or dead.
    I am glad somebody else beat me to this, especially someone with more knowledge on the matter and someone with first hand experience on this. In Britain, serving soldiers are often viewed with suspicion and tend to be considered those that have 'failed' in life. They are not respected by their people like US Soldiers seem to be. The hardship they go through, not only in combat but in everyday training, which as anyone knows is often gruelling, is rarely acknowledged. Some of you Americans would simply be DISGUSTED by how out troops are treated!

    Oh, and of course this is WHILE THEY ARE SERVING....nevermind when they have given their lives or witnessed trauma at first hand and are no longer part of the Armed Forces. Its an outrage.

    Well it may not count for much tommywho5150 but as one Englishman to another, your sacrifice, of blood sweat and tears, and that of your three friends who paid the ultimate price is remembered by me and my mates on a daily basis.
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  12. #12
    Atomic Punk
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    Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome has become another cliche in our world. There is very very little understanding and APPRECIATION for what people go through. The transition from battlefield to doing the groceries and watching the kids, sleeping in a bed next to your wife, and just going about a normal life can be incredibly difficult. Our military does very very little to prepare people for that and our communities aren't any better. It's not just a matter of debriefing someone, giving them a handshake and a thank you and telling them to enjoy being back home. The very same machine that sends them to war has to prepare them ahead of time for coming BACK from the war; give them the tools and the recourses as well as make sure they feel comfortable utilizing them. The tendency for many people is carry the psychological burden silently by themselves. Whether it's because their training emphasizes being "strong" and "brave" or their upbringing teaches them that "real" men don't share their feelings or cry about anything. It's not macho or noble or being a "good soldier" to try and process what they see, feel and experience in war by themselves and until THAT issue is addressed we will continue to see people unable to make the transition back to regular life.

    And I'm not just talking about bullshit group therapy with the cliche "i'm ok/you're ok" bullshit. I'm talking about individual programs and processes that allow each person to do whatever they need to do as an individual to begin digesting their experiences and make the segue into a civilian context. Not everyone needs the same thing and not everyone comes back with the same type of wounds, physical, emotional or psychological. What one person may have no problem whatsoever with, another one may be shattered inside. I've known many many men that suffered serious emotional trauma going through what sounded to me like absolutely nothing and I've met many many many men who walked through hell and came out without even an trace bit of emotional damage.

    It saddens me to see so many people completely unable to process their own emotional wounds and psychological trauma, be they war related or otherwise. Until people begin to understand that it is not a sign of weakness to seek help with something like this, until we as a human community can accept the fact that people need support and help to deal with things that we may not understand, until we accept the fact that what may not upset us may in fact ruin another person's life, we will continue to see more and more emotionally and psychologically wounded people come back from war and not make the transition. Hell, if we can't take care of our own when they go off to WAR, how is it that we can be surprised that regular people living their lives among us become emotionally and psychologically shattered and have no means of repairing themselves.

    Sadly, our culture's only answer to this kind of thing is pharmaceutical anti-anxiety and anti-depressants and if it isn't that it's simply "look, bad things happen, get over it." If we're not drugging people up so they're unable to see, touch or acknowledge their wounds in any meaningful or productive way, we're giving them some macho bullshit about "real men" don't cry. We tell them to toughen up and to appreciate the fact that they're still alive or that they're "LUCKY" to be alive.

    There is simply no respect or appreciation given to the significance of emotional and psychological wounds. I think most of that is due to the fact that those refusing to give that respect are afraid of their own wounds and to acknowledge another man's wound is to acknowledge your own.

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    Baluchitherium
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    Quote Originally Posted by YO!Edward View Post
    I am glad somebody else beat me to this, especially someone with more knowledge on the matter and someone with first hand experience on this. In Britain, serving soldiers are often viewed with suspicion and tend to be considered those that have 'failed' in life. They are not respected by their people like US Soldiers seem to be. The hardship they go through, not only in combat but in everyday training, which as anyone knows is often gruelling, is rarely acknowledged. Some of you Americans would simply be DISGUSTED by how out troops are treated!

    Oh, and of course this is WHILE THEY ARE SERVING....nevermind when they have given their lives or witnessed trauma at first hand and are no longer part of the Armed Forces. Its an outrage.

    Well it may not count for much tommywho5150 but as one Englishman to another, your sacrifice, of blood sweat and tears, and that of your three friends who paid the ultimate price is remembered by me and my mates on a daily basis.

    first of all can i say thankyou.
    you are correct that we are often "left out to dry" and made to feel like inadequate soldiers, because we have been injured and had to leave the army for whatever reason, and again once you rejoin the civilian life people dont understand and either view you as being a violent phsyco or a pathetic excuse for a man, i have been fortunate in i have found the correct rehabilitation program for me, but this wasnt through the army but another soldier who had been injured (in afganistan).
    while iwas passing through u.s. customs the obvious happened, the metal detectors went wild so after explaining i was full of pins, plates etc i had a conversation with a customs officer who took me straight to the front of the line, and i can honestly say it was one of the most healing conversations i've had with anyone, he was very respectful and polite and treated me with understanding and even said thankyou.
    from other comments in this thread people are sying that the american public aren't as supportive as they should be, this is perhaps true, but during my 2 week vacation i encountered nothing but respect and massive patriotism and love for the troops out there...even if the people concerned didnt agree with the war.
    http://www.facebook.com/Tommywho5150

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    I truly appreciated reading these posts, guys. Thanks to those who opened up here; I know we all have "known" one another for a while, but we of course still hesitate with getting deeply personal sometimes.

    I have only experienced the Iraq war from an "average" U.S citizen perspective. I've known a few people who have gone over to Iraq or Afghanistan in either a military or private capacity (a former cop friend of mine who was working as a security contactor was abducted now more than a year ago and hasn't been heard from since), and I keep up with news and politics a lot, but all of that info requires filtering and the necessary "reading between the lines." Personal accounts like these are what I find to be the most interesting and informative.

    One of my heroes in politics is the now-deceased Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone. Wellstone was a staunch liberal and someone the Bush Administration saw as a major obstacle--thus he was targeted in the '02 elections. He died in a plane crash ten days before the election. Wellstone was a major opponent of war and was extremely vocal about Bush's then push to pass the war resolution. Still, during his 12 years in the senate, one of Wellstone's major focuses was Veteran's affairs and funding of hospitals and groups, etc. Why was it a major anti-war senator was the biggest champion of his time for veteran's issues? It seems like we have to learn over and over again that a war is never over when the fighting ends or when troops come home.

    Though I have left-leaning tendencies, I really don't subscribe to the rhetoric or extreme party unity thing. Taking care of our troops--especially after their tours of duty--is fast becoming something I consider a major priority NOW. And I'm extremely disappointed it has hardly been discussed in all of the election talk thus far.

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    Quote Originally Posted by broken9500 View Post


    Sadly, our culture's only answer to this kind of thing is pharmaceutical anti-anxiety and anti-depressants and if it isn't that it's simply "look, bad things happen, get over it." If we're not drugging people up so they're unable to see, touch or acknowledge their wounds in any meaningful or productive way, we're giving them some macho bullshit about "real men" don't cry. We tell them to toughen up and to appreciate the fact that they're still alive or that they're "LUCKY" to be alive.

    There is simply no respect or appreciation given to the significance of emotional and psychological wounds. I think most of that is due to the fact that those refusing to give that respect are afraid of their own wounds and to acknowledge another man's wound is to acknowledge your own.
    But without some of these drugs, people would be curled up in a ball unable to function at all. While I am not a proponent of prescribing the drugs without the necessary counseling to go with it, they are needed until the person can work out all the emotional issues they are dealing with on the road to recovery and perhaps that is what you are saying as well.

    There are also instances that a person needs some of these drugs permanently without the counseling. Just as some people's bodies do not produce insulin in the correct amount, some people do not produce the correct amount of other chemicals to function properly. I've seen it first hand and trust me when I say, these drugs can be a real necessity. Of course there is always room for abuse as there is with anything where a doctor doesn't want to do the work that is required to actual "heal" a person.

 

 

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