Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube
Register
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Atomic Punk
    Join Date
    01.29.02
    Age
    49
    Location
    somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    22,946
    Last Online

    12.11.17 @ 04:37 PM
    Likes
    842
    Liked 1,229 Times in 448 Posts

    Default America's Hungry, now living with less...

    http://www.secondharvest.org/

    Food bank donations down sharply - Officials fear ‘donor fatigue’ in year plagued by disasters domestic, abroad

    Some of the nation’s bigger food charities and food banks are reporting that donations have continued long-standing declines, decreases that may well continue through the holidays.

    Turkeyless Thanksgiving
    City Harvest, a New York City relief organization that delivers donated food to hundreds of community programs throughout the city's five boroughs, notes that donations of turkeys, staple of Thanksgiving, are down dramatically.

    “Could we use more turkeys? Yes,” said Patricia Barrick, director of marketing and communication at City Harvest. “We’ve gotten about 3,500 turkeys so far; we can use about 10,000.”

    Barrick said that partly because of diversion of funds on behalf of Gulf Coast storm victims, her organization was down about $160,000.

    The Food Bank for New York City, which supplies meals to 240,000 New Yorkers a day, has similarly reported a drop in donations of holiday turkeys — and food in general.

    “We are tapping into our reserves,” spokeswoman Lisa Jakobsberg told The Associated Press. “I have not seen our shelves as empty as they are right now since 9/11.”

    Officials at the charities fear that “donor fatigue” may have set in, with people’s charitable instincts stretched to the limit in a year of an uncommon number of weather-related tragedies.

    At food charities in Seattle, Los Angeles, New York and Milwaukee, donations are down in large measure because of the one-two punch of serial disasters at home and abroad.

    The desperate call for donations for victims of Hurricane Katrina, and other Gulf Coast storms, was only compounded by the staggering need in Pakistan after an earthquake killed 70,000 people and left hundreds of thousands homeless.

    Less food, more people who need it
    Those dire situations have a parallel in America's growing food needs. An October report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that 2004 was the fifth consecutive year in which the number of Americans in households at risk of hunger increased. The number of people living in what the USDA calls “food-insecure” households rose to 38.2 million last year, including 13.8 million children.

    Food-bank officials say the problem's only gotten worse since then. The effect has been the worst of scenarios: a decrease in food donations and an increase in the number of people who need them.

    “Our food donations are significantly down this year compared to last year — they’re down about 20 percent,” said Becky Guerra, community affairs director for Northwest Harvest, a Washington state-based charity with offices in Seattle and warehouses serving 300 food banks throughout western Washington. “But our client numbers are up.”

    Guerra said the charity’s Cherry Street Food Bank in Seattle “is serving 3,000 more households a month compared to last year.”

    “We’re seeing people being pushed over the edge, struggling to feed themselves and heat their homes. They're having to stretch that much more. People are having to choose between medical expenses and good as other social services are cut,” Guerra said. “We're hoping it’s a temporary situation, but we just don know at this point.”

    The young and the old
    Guerra noted that those most vulnerable in society — the very young and the very old — bear the brunt. “Forty percent of the people we serve are children, and that’s held steady from year to year,” she said. “Another 17 percent are elderly.”

    Guerra admitted that, because her organization doesn't put the needy through the hassle of paperwork in order to get assistance, some of her information was anecdotal in nature. “We don't have detailed demographics; we just know what we see every day — we're seeing more, more, more.”

    It's much the same in Los Angeles. “We are down a little compared to last year,” said Darren Hoffman, public relations director of the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank. “The reason for that mainly is related to disasters. Some of our bigger donors nationally have redirected a lot of their product — and appropriately so — to the Gulf Coast during the disasters. That's where we're seeing a bit of a downtrend.”

    “Last year we distributed 45 million pounds of food, so year-to-date we’re about 12 percent down from that,” Hoffman said. “On [financial] donations, we're waiting to hear. A lot of our direct-mail appeals are out right now. Most of our donors are pretty strong and steadfast; they might pull out some extra money. We probably won't know about financial donations until early next year, but in product donations we have seen a decrease.”

    In Milwaukee, a fall food drive held by a regional food bank collected about 19,200 pounds of food, down from about 40,600 pounds last year.

    “We heard specifically from many of the schools that the reason why they weren’t collecting this year was that they had already collected for Katrina victims in September,” said Gina Styer, spokeswoman for Wisconsin's chapter of America’s Second Harvest, the largest network of U.S. food banks.

    A bright spot, in cans
    For City Harvest’s Barrick, the outlook isn’t entirely bleak. “The good news is in local donations,” she said. “Canned goods are still coming in. We're finding that individuals in New York want to donate, and we're very fortunate to have canned food drives that are going strong. Those donations are on a par with last year.”

    The bigger challenge is in getting turkeys, the birds that are, for many, the gustatory symbol of the holiday season.

    “It’s where we have to procure food from a distance,” Barrick said. “Turkeys fall into that category — New York isn’t where they breed turkeys — as well as fresh produce. Pennsylvania and the Midwest is where the wholesalers are, and bringing in things from far away, there’s always costs associated with that.”

    For Barrick, and for the other charities as well, a waiting game begins, one that continues through December. “I think it’s the period where we sit patiently watching and waiting,” Barrick said.

    “This is a very heavy fund-raising time,” she said. “We’re just getting into it now, looking to see if we’ll see donor fatigue resulting from anything from the hurricanes to Pakistan and everything else in the world. It is a critical fund-raising season for us.”

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  2. #2
    Atomic Punk
    Join Date
    01.29.02
    Age
    49
    Location
    somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    22,946
    Last Online

    12.11.17 @ 04:37 PM
    Likes
    842
    Liked 1,229 Times in 448 Posts

    Default

    Food pantries need donations; Kitchens want Brevard's help as holidays near
    FLORIDA TODAY

    Single mother Adri-yanna Herdener, 31, stood in line at the Daily Bread soup kitchen, waiting with about 50 people for a free lunch of baked chicken, vegetables, mashed potatoes with gravy and a salad.

    "I don't get any food stamps anymore, so it helps me make it stretch through the month with food," Herdener said.

    Like 68 percent of the people who turn to Daily Bread for a hot meal, Herdener is not homeless. She is on Social Security and shares a home with her 7-year-old daughter and her fiance, a handyman. The couple has another daughter on the way in about two months.

    As the holidays approach, the area's soup kitchens, shelters and food pantries hope Brevard County residents agree once again to share their abundance with those in need. Many companies choose this time of the year to gather food and cash donations to give back to their community.

    "We are truly the beneficiaries of people giving of their time, talent and treasure," said Daily Bread Executive Director John Farrell.

    Donate food today
    Daily Bread's soup kitchen serves 200 to 250 people daily. The kitchen is open seven days a week, 365 days a year, providing a hot midday meal plus hygienic services, including showers and laundry, along with mail service, to any one in need.

    Farrell said 95 percent of the food they serve people is donated. But 5 percent, along with plates, cups and utensils, is bought with donated money. The kitchen also buys and accepts donations of soap, shampoo, deodorant, clothing and blankets.

    "We get no support from the federal, state, county or local government," Farrell said. "Everything we get is donated."

    A food drive today involving area Boy Scouts will benefit Daily Bread. Scouts handed out plastic grocery bags last weekend for homeowners to fill and be collected today. In addition, donors can drop off nonperishable items today at local Winn-Dixie stores.

    Scouts throughout Central Florida are hoping to collect more than 500,000 pounds of food in Brevard, Flagler, Lake, Orange, Osceola, Seminole and Volusia counties.

    "The food collected by our Scouts will provide more than 370,000 meals for those in need this holiday season," said Ron Oats, executive director of the Central Florida Council of Boy Scouts.

    11 million meals
    According to the 2006 "Hunger in Central Florida" report issued by Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, based in Orlando, almost 54,000 people a week in Central Florida's seven counties receive assistance. The food bank provides about 11 million meals each year.

    Inside Second Harvest's Brevard warehouse on Vickie Circle in West Melbourne, a pallet of Krispy Kreme doughnuts waited to be distributed, along with dozens of boxes of Honeynut Cheerios, enough laundry detergent to fill a small pool and 50-pound bags of potatoes.

    Executive Director Valerie Carl said nearly 100 local agencies from small church pantries to large shelters, including Daily Bread, utilize their services.

    "We're gearing up right now for our holiday food drive," Carl said.

    One company that chose Second Harvest as the beneficiary of its food drive is the new Ford Motor Co. regional office in Melbourne.

    "We wanted to help out and give back to our community," regional manager Terry Huckaby said.

    The company plans to "Stuff a Cubicle" with as many nonperishable food items as they can and decorate money jars for cash donations.

    Salvation Army
    And it wouldn't be the Christmas season without hearing the ringing of the Salvation Army bells at area retailers. More than $119,000 in change was dropped into Melbourne area red kettles last year and $275,000 sent to the Melbourne office of the charity.

    The holiday giving amounted to 65 percent of the Salvation Army's annual budget.

    "With gas prices so high and the economy taking a downward trend, we're seeing more and more of a need," Salvation Army Maj. Tim Williford said. "Americans have an overwhelming sense of compassion when they see their fellow man in need."

    And for that, Herdener is grateful.

    In addition to eating at Daily Bread, she also volunteers there.

    Herdener urged people to give from their hearts "to help those that are less fortunate, that don't have a home."
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  3. #3
    Atomic Punk bsbll4's Avatar
    Join Date
    02.18.03
    Age
    34
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    8,660
    Favorite VH Album

    Van Halen/ADKOT
    Favorite VH Song

    Hot For Teacher
    Last Online

    12.15.17 @ 12:23 PM
    Likes
    575
    Liked 2,238 Times in 1,130 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    I wonder if they are getting less than ever or just less since 9/11. The article doesn't really spell that out very well. That being said, it shouldn't be a surprise that the number of hungry is growing. The population is always growing and in this country, the highest birthrates are from those in the poorest neighborhoods.

    The question is: is the percentage increase of those considered "hungry" or "at risk" out pacing the growth of the general population? If it is, that's a scary trend.
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

  4. #4
    Sinner's Swing! graeme's Avatar
    Join Date
    01.27.03
    Age
    10
    Location
    Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Posts
    3,946
    Favorite VH Album

    They're all shit
    Last Online

    11.19.17 @ 09:41 AM
    Likes
    0
    Liked 34 Times in 20 Posts

    Default

    There was a piece on English tv yesterday about the possibility of recession in the US this or next year. The reporter went on to talk about the situation in Detroit, saying that, as far of ther residents of this city are concerned, the recession is already with them.

    It followed a few families, blue and white collar, who had lost jobs and then benefits, and were now going to charity warehouses, just to stock the cupboards with food.

    It was pretty heartbreaking stuff. One family man, being interviewed about his plight, said that he had worked for thirty years for the same company and when laid off could not get other work. Savings gone, the camera crew followed him trying to get food for his kids from a charitable organisation.

    The amazing paradox in this piece was that he was sitting in the kitchen of a very nice house yet had no money to eat. Wonder how much longer he'll be able to keep that roof over his head.

    It's coming folks, not just in the US either, most of Europe is looking rightly fucked. Sell up everything now and wait it out. Then do the vulture bit and come back when the whole fucking show has collapsed and buy yourself a better future on the cheap.

    and maybe find it in your hearts to help those that are GOING TO lose out in a big way.
    A man could lose himself in a country like this.

    My blog at http://tollins.blogspot.de/

  5. #5
    Atomic Punk bsbll4's Avatar
    Join Date
    02.18.03
    Age
    34
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    8,660
    Favorite VH Album

    Van Halen/ADKOT
    Favorite VH Song

    Hot For Teacher
    Last Online

    12.15.17 @ 12:23 PM
    Likes
    575
    Liked 2,238 Times in 1,130 Posts


    Premium Member

    Default

    Thanks for making me feel better
    CNN may think my opinion matters, but you shouldn't.

  6. #6
    Atomic Punk
    Join Date
    06.15.06
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    13,741
    Favorite VH Album

    VHIII/WACF/OU51BALUCK
    Last Online

    07.24.11 @ 04:36 PM
    Likes
    0
    Liked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by graeme View Post
    There was a piece on English tv yesterday about the possibility of recession in the US this or next year. The reporter went on to talk about the situation in Detroit, saying that, as far of ther residents of this city are concerned, the recession is already with them.

    It followed a few families, blue and white collar, who had lost jobs and then benefits, and were now going to charity warehouses, just to stock the cupboards with food.

    It was pretty heartbreaking stuff. One family man, being interviewed about his plight, said that he had worked for thirty years for the same company and when laid off could not get other work. Savings gone, the camera crew followed him trying to get food for his kids from a charitable organisation.

    The amazing paradox in this piece was that he was sitting in the kitchen of a very nice house yet had no money to eat. Wonder how much longer he'll be able to keep that roof over his head.

    It's coming folks, not just in the US either, most of Europe is looking rightly fucked. Sell up everything now and wait it out. Then do the vulture bit and come back when the whole fucking show has collapsed and buy yourself a better future on the cheap.

    and maybe find it in your hearts to help those that are GOING TO lose out in a big way.
    This is a great example of why traditional definitions of "recession" and "economic growth" and other such concepts have become archaic. There is such a huge split between the figures and market analysis that we hear every quarter about consumer faith and spending and the health of the market and what regular people are experiencing in their day-to-day lives. I don't surround myself with whackjobs or alarmists and most everyone I spend time with is what we'd all consider middle-class and upper-middle class, employed full-time with very respectable positions in all sorts of industries. They are home-owners, have families, the whole bit and not a ONE OF THEM says they're doing as well as the government is telling them they should be doing. If you ask me, the economy sucks right now and the inflation that we're told isn't happening because the FED is doing such a wonderful job of managing interest rates began a long time ago! Groceries, gas, clothes, toiletries, cleaning products, all those things cost more than they did even 6 months ago. Again, I'm not being a Chicken Little or anything and I'm just saying that for several years now, there is a huge schism between what people are experiencing and what they're told they are experiencing. And I'm not just pointing to my own personal experience as anectdotal evidence, there are more and more reports from alternates sources that are showing this discrepency.
    Last edited by broken9500; 11.19.07 at 08:22 AM.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. America's 20 Craziest Politicians
    By Hot Sauce in forum Political Underground
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12.19.14, 05:19 PM
  2. America's most dangerous jobs
    By ZeoBandit in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08.17.06, 10:01 AM
  3. I'm hungry... who wants wings from Hooters?
    By SeriousDooDoo in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Non-Music)
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 02.11.03, 09:25 PM
  4. I'm hungry... who wants wings from Hooters?
    By SeriousDooDoo in forum Main VH Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01.18.02, 01:38 PM
  5. COC: America's Volume Dealer
    By paradiddle in forum VH Fans Meeting Place (Music Only)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11.10.00, 09:49 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •