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  1. #1
    Eruption
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    Default The Official HOMEBREWING Thread

    Hey,

    This is a place for Homebrewers to UNITE! For those of us that like to experiment and make our own beer, here is where we come together. Let's talk about any and all homebrewing: Techniques, ingredients, styles, equipment, horror stories (we all have them), and anything else you can think of.

    I am currently brewing (as I type this) a Christmas Ale that I made up today called Santa's Little Helper. It's a Darker Winter style ale with cinnamon and nutmeg added. Think of a heavy, dark, English Ale with some spice.

    If anyone wants the recipe I am more than happy to give it out.


    evans5150
    Thunder Mountain Brewing Company
    Owner and Brewmaster

    Bottled: 2010 Imperial Bastard Stout (9.5% ABV)
    Bottled: 2011 Thunder Mountain Pale Ale (5.5% ABV)
    Fermenting: 2011 Thunder Mountain Irrish Ale (4.9% ABV)


    "I'm just a normal jerk who happens to make music. As long as my brain and fingers work, I'm cool." -Eddie Van Halen, 1996

  2. #2
    Eruption EVHWolf's Avatar
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    I actually just started home brewing this week. So, I have nothing to show for it yet, but am looking forward to trying things out. I cleaned the hell out of everything and am watching the carboy and beer do it thing...I'd love to take a look at your receipe as I love Christmas Ales.
    For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge the New England Fucking Patriots, Dallas Fucking Cowboys, New York Fucking Giants, Washington Fucking Redskins, Carolina Fucking Panthers, Tampa Bay Fucking Bucs, Florida Fucking Marlins, Atlanta Fucking Braves, New York Fucking Mets, Boston Fucking Red Sox, Boston Fucking Bruins, and New Jersey Fucking Devils.

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  3. #3
    Damage your reputation seenbad's Avatar
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    A few years ago I got in to making hard apple cider. Damn it was goooood! I was thinking about busting out the bottles of stuff again this year but just haven't gotten around to it.

    I'm going the lazy route this year and just making some Limoncello. Just need some everclear, some lemons and some vanilla beans and sugar.
    sheepa latta peepah dabba looka foh a moopy

    Gunter glieben glauchen globen

  4. #4
    Atomic Punk chefcraig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seenbad View Post
    ...I'm going the lazy route this year and just making some Limoncello. Just need some everclear, some lemons and some vanilla beans and sugar.
    Seen, how long does that take for "setting up"? I mean, does it need to ferment for an extended period?
    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
    George Bernard Shaw

  5. #5
    Atomic Punk
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    I've been really curious about getting into homebrewing for quite some time. I know I like good beers, ales and stouts, mostly European imports and most of the Mexican beers and I really enjoy going to Specs and trying new beers I've never heard of. Where can I get started? How much of an investment does it take to get going?

  6. #6
    Hot For Teacher
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    I made moonshine one year from corn syrup and a teapot kettle.. not good but lethal HAHA

  7. #7
    Atomic Punk WinterlessIceness's Avatar
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    Me and my dad used to brew wine for a couple of years while I was still at home. I hate wine with passion, but my folks like it so what the hell. Since we'd always move to our countryside house for the summer we had a whole forrest to harvest, so to pick some 50Ltr of raspberries and blackberries was just a matter of 2-3 days. Then it was the fun part - I'd do all the math regarding how much sugar/water should be added during each stage of the process. So we had two 50Ltr (13 gallons) bottles filled with minced berries/sugar/water slowly brewing into a really fine wine (which I again couldn't stand but my folks loved it).

    Please someone post a recipe for making liqueurs!

  8. #8
    Damage your reputation seenbad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefcraig View Post
    Seen, how long does that take for "setting up"? I mean, does it need to ferment for an extended period?
    80 days.
    sheepa latta peepah dabba looka foh a moopy

    Gunter glieben glauchen globen

  9. #9
    Atomic Punk chefcraig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seenbad View Post
    80 days.
    Seriously? For some of the concoctions my friends and I made years ago, we'd cover the bottles with burlap and put them away in for about a month or so. In fact, at one time we secured them in plastic and settled them into a compost heap for about 2 months.
    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
    George Bernard Shaw

  10. #10
    Eye suffacozza YEWW! Goo's Avatar
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    12.11.17 @ 05:34 PM
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    Good timing - I know DIF was picking up a homebrewing kit and about to start experimenting, we spoke about it on email a bit and he said once he had something to write about, he'd probably kick off a homebrew thread.

    I used to brew a lot a few years ago but quit when I kinda realised that I could now finally afford to become an alcoholic! So I stopped for about 10 years. Last year I decided I was a little better off in the self control dept (having a woman in your ear helps too!) so I resumed brewing.

    Mainly do kits, I dont really have the time or patience to go all grain, but I do like to play around with the kits and change yeasts, add small hop/grain boils to the mix and the like. Among my better efforts have been a couple of pretty good stouts and a nice amber ale.

    Basically I mix up my kit in the fermenter (recently started using filtered water as an experiment, seems to be helping a little), add in whatever I'm experimenting with on the day, I usually rehydrate and start the dry yeast in a alittle water with some suger just to get it all foaming up a bit, then toss that in, seal it up

    Because it gets hot here, I place the fermenter in an old fridge with a temp controller to try and hold it at a good fermenting temperature. I usually give it a week or two in there till it ferments off, then rack it over to a secondary fermenter, put it back in the fridge and drop the temeperature right down for a couple weeks to try and drop out as much yeast as possible. I've found this, and being able to control temperatures to be the biggest benefit to my beer quality

    After that process is done, I drain it over to a priming bucket, mix in some dextrose and bottle it up.

    The great thing bout home brewing is time usually fixes a dodgy brew. Pop a bottle and if it doesnt taste so flash, leave 'em on the shelf another month or so and it makes a world of difference

    I'll go take some happy snaps out in the brewery shed later, got a couple lagers to rack over to secondarys

    A little zen....... Headed your way.......

  11. #11
    Sinner's Swing! InTheBeginning's Avatar
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    07.20.17 @ 05:17 PM
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    Quote Originally Posted by evans5150 View Post
    This is a place for Homebrewers to UNITE!
    Nice thread! I think there was one before the hack a few years ago. I haven't brewed in quite a few years....but I'm wanting to get back into it. Your Christmas Ale sounds great! I used to make one with cinnamon, nutmeg and I even added a little orange peel to the fermenter for a little surprise!

    It's just tough with a 4 year old and a 10 month old to find the time...


    Quote Originally Posted by WinterlessIceness View Post
    Please someone post a recipe for making liqueurs!
    Coffee liqueurs are the easiest to make. Found this:

    Coffee liqueur based on espresso coffee:
    1 cup (2.4 dl) espresso coffee (or strong South American coffee)
    1 cup sugar
    2 cups vodka (40-50% or 80-100 proof)
    1/2 vanilla bean split lengthwise
    Make a fresh brew of espresso coffee or strong coffee of a similar type. Add the sugar. After cooling, add the vanilla bean and vodka. Transfer to a bottle. After 2-4 weeks strain, remove the vanilla bean and transfer to a new bottle.

    You may substitute half a cup of vodka with brandy to obtain a slightly different flavor.

    Others
    A little more volume in the headphones please.

  12. #12
    Sinner's Swing! InTheBeginning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by InTheBeginning View Post
    I used to make one with cinnamon, nutmeg and I even added a little orange peel to the fermenter for a little surprise!
    hmmmmm...I can't find my recipe book but I may have also added a few cloves to the fermenter as well. I remember one year, I came really close to it tasting like Anchor Christmas Ale.
    A little more volume in the headphones please.

  13. #13
    Good Enough jeff spicoli's Avatar
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    12.11.17 @ 08:33 PM
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    I've been homebrewing for probably 12 years now. I love it!

    I have been an extract/specialty grains brewer pretty much the whole time. I get all of my ingredients in kits from Maltose Express in Monroe, CT. For those of you who may be familiar with the recipe books Clonebrews or Beer Captured, it's the shop owned by the authors, the Szamatulski's. Real nice people.

    I'm going to make the jump to all grain at some point. I've just been too lazy to go out and get the additional gear necessary. I also need to go out and get a small refrigerator to regulate temps so I can brew lagers. I've been an ale brewer due to apartment dwelling for most of my homebrewing career. Much easier to ferment at room temperature.

    Last X-mas, the Mrs. got me a small fridge and a kit to convert it into a 2 tap kegerator. I will never bottle beer again, unless I'm giving it out as gifts. I want to eventually make a tap handle to go along with each new beer I keg.

    The flagship brew for Angry Turtle Brewing (I went to U. of Maryland) is a vanilla porter. I add 5-6 vanilla beans that have been cut, scraped, and soaked in vodka for a couple of days to the secondary fermenter. Everyone that has ever tasted it has loved it.

    EVHWolf, the best piece of advice I can give you is watch your fermentation temperatures. I learned the hard way that brewing in the summer isn't the best idea. Stout actively fermenting + 90 degree summer day = exploding fermenter + every coat in the closet to the dry cleaner + unhappy wife.

    Cheers!
    ^
    ^
    ^---See that beer in my av? Brewed it myself.

    VHLinks Official Brewmaster (title bought)
    Angry Turtle Brewing

  14. #14
    Sinner's Swing! InTheBeginning's Avatar
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    Not a Hoppy Time

    It's not a hoppy time
    By Karen Rouse
    The Denver Post
    Article Last Updated: 11/12/2007 11:53:33 PM MST

    At Stomp Them Grapes, the international shortage of beer hops has hit home.

    In the Denver home-brewers supply store, signs taped to two freezers holding pouches of leaf and pellet hops — the flower used to give bitterness, flavor and aroma to beer — alert customers: “Due to hop shortage crisis, hops will only be sold in amounts needed to fill a recipe.”

    “We had to stop selling hops on the Internet,” said Brian Carter, co-owner of Stomp Them Grapes, who limits customers to 4 ounces at a time. “Last week, people were trying to buy 100 ounces.”

    The shortage stems from a prior 10- to 12-year surplus that prompted hops farmers to reduce acreage, as well as hail and flooding in Europe, said Julia Herz, director of craft-beer marketing for the Brewers Association in Boulder.

    “There is a 10 to 15 percent shortage,” she said.

    Craft brewers, which rely on hops to produce a wide range of flavors, are particularly susceptible, she said.

    While major brewers have long-term contracts that lock in supplies and prices, industry experts say smaller microbrewers and consumers will feel more of the pinch.

    “The prices are definitely going to go up,” said Benj Steinman, publisher of New York-based Beer Marketer's Insights.

    Boston Beer, the No. 1 craft brewer and maker of Samuel Adams, is looking at a 5 percent increase in retail prices, said Steinman.

    “The hop world is in crisis right now,” said Ralph Woodall, director of sales at Yakima, Wash.-based Hopunion LLC, which supplies hops to 1,200 craft brewers, brewpubs and home-brew supply stores in the United States and Canada.

    On Monday, even as he scrambled to fill orders for breweries that had not contracted orders ahead of time, Woodall said he believes the beer industry will feel the pain for up to three years out.

    Woodall said the U.S. and Germany produce about 75 percent of the world's hops.

    He has seen Cascade hops, the most popular among craft brewers, jump from $4.10 per pound to about $12.35 per pound in two months.

    “It's going to be painful,” he said.

    Kevin Lange, owner of the Brew Hut and Dry Dock Brewing in Aurora, said he is getting around the shortage by using multiple suppliers from Washington, Oregon, Ohio and Denver.

    “This year, we're relying on them more than we have in the past to make up some of our deficit,” he said.

    At Idaho Springs-based Tommyknocker Brewery, which produces 9,000 barrels of beer per year, head brewer Steve Indrehus expects prices to go up.

    A six-pack of “Maple Nut Brown Ale,” its flagship beer, is currently $6.99, while a case costs $28. Those prices will likely go up to $7.25 and $29 respectively, said Indrehus.

    He said hops are not the only reason; the industry is taking a hit from increases in barley and glass costs.

    Across the state, hundreds of home-brewers who belong to clubs like “Foam on the Range,” “Keg Ran Out Club” and “Hop Barley and the Alers” are paying attention.

    Shawn Hyde makes about 5 gallons of beer every two weeks, spending about $4 to $5 on hops each time. “My concern is if that's going to double,” he said.

    Home-brewer Lance Davison said the shortage offers a new challenge to home-brewers.

    “We may not be able to get a certain type of hop at the store,” he said. “You've presented (us) with a new challenge, trying to modify the recipe in order to take advantage (of) what you do have available.”

    Karen Rouse: 303-954-1684 or krouse@denverpost.com


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Now you know ... hops
    What they do:Hops give beer flavor and aroma, act as a preservative and help in head retention.

    What they are:Perennial plants that can be male or female. Male plants are for breeding and have no use in the brewing of beer. The female plant produces a hop cone containing the chemical properties that are used in brewing. There are two basic types: Aroma hops are used as a finishing or conditioning agent in beer; bitter hops are used in the boiling process to enhance bitterness.

    History:The use of hops for beer production dates from A.D. 736 in south-central Europe. They were introduced to America in 1629 by colonists. Today, most commercially grown hops come from Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

    Source: Hopunion LLC


    http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_7446274
    A little more volume in the headphones please.

 

 

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