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  1. #1
    Good Enough
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    06.19.15 @ 04:34 PM
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    Default Soundproofing Tips and Advice?

    We rehearse in a section of my finished basement, which is straight out of the 70's with old panelling and indoor/outdoor carpeting. The sound bouncing off the panelling finally got to all of us, so we covered the walls with very dense, 1.5" foam padding. While this was a huge improvement in the room's sound quality and allows us to hear each other much better - as I understand it, this is just sound absorbtion and not true soundproofing.

    However after reading about sound proofing on the web, I'm thinking that I might be able to reduce the amount of noise that travels outside the house by sheetrocking over the foam on the walls - thereby creating more mass and space to kill the noise. Although we try not to practice past 9:30 pm and my neighbors are really cool and have never complained, I think it would be best to try and limit the amount of noise they hear.

    If anyone thinks the method I've described above will work/help or can offer some advice, please let me know. Thanks!
    http://www.myspace.com/pennydreadfulnj

    “…and that’s when I learned that waterskiing and Quaaludes do not mix.”

    - Dewey Cox

  2. #2
    Top Of The World ncbuckeye3's Avatar
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    03.10.12 @ 09:20 PM
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    If you are going to put sheetrock up, then replace that foam with US Green Fiber Cocoon Cellulose Insulation (http://www.us-gf.com/. It is available at Lowe's, it is a blow-in insulation. I used to train on this product and one of the demos they gave us to train on was a five gallon bucket with the insulation in it. There was four-inches of insulation around the edge of the bucket, which is how wide an average wall is. The middle of the bucket was hollow and it had one of those rape-alert whistles that are annoying and loud as hell. If you turned the whistle on and lifted it out of the bucket, it was deafening, when you put it in the bucket with the insulation around it, you couldn't hear it at all.

    If I were going to soundproof something, I would use this stuff, nothing else. Frame up your walls with 2 x 4's with 24" centers , put sheetrock on it almost to the top, then fill the gaps with this stuff, you won't be sorry.

  3. #3
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    08.06.08 @ 04:31 AM
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    Default

    I've built a couple of rehearsal rooms in various homes and I've run amuk through the soundproofing vs. sound-absorption problem in real situations. The smallest air gap, like a door that has 1/4" - 1/8" of space at the bottom to allow it to swing open/closed can cause a lot of sound to escape into the next room. Its very frustrating when you think you've got all this mass on the walls & ceiling and you've got acoustic foam & insulation everywhere only to still hear a ton of leakage into the next room. Frankly, you need to accept a bit of that; so there's a little bit of forewarning there.

    Having said that, The best results I've ever heard came from rooms that were built within rooms. That is, if you have a room [let's say in the basement], build another wall 2-3" away from each of the existing walls without physically connecting the new walls to the old ones.

    The biggest problem overall I've had is making sure I'm within local building codes and making the inspectors happy. The letter of the building codes is pretty easy to follow but its the inspector who needs to be educated about acoustics and what you're attempting to do that will be an issue. Most inspectors see DIY builders try stuff all the time and frankly I don't blame them for being suspicious most of the time. But when they see rooms built within rooms or double walls, you'll probably get 20 questions about WHY you're doing it and they'll probably ask you to physically connect the inner walls to the outer ones somehow (which totally defeats the purpose). One example in my last build was that I put an air-gap between the wall of the control room and the studio performance room by building two stud walls (each of which was to code). The inspector forced me to put a fire-block header between the two walls (totally makes sense and should be done) but he forced me to connect the two walls with that header. That one header leaks a lot of vibration between the two rooms now.

    FWIW, I hope this helps. Good luck. Just don't negate your home owners insurance by trying to duck any building codes. It isn't worth it.

  4. #4
    Little Dreamer
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    01.10.12 @ 10:46 PM
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    Just finished buiding my own studio last fall doing exactly this. I was pretty surprised to see that the people who have already replied to your request, know pretty much what they're talking about and I commend you on knowing the difference between acoustic conditioning and sound proofing. You're already further than most people. However, there is much more to it all. More than you'll ever want to know, frankly.

    Check out http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php for advice from people who do it all the time.

    The biggest mistake you could make acoustically, is with the damn foam on the walls. Foam cuts down on high freq. reflections and has zero effect on anything below 1kHz resulting in a boomy, muddy room sound.

    Embrace the reflections. Control them, redirect them, don't try and remove them.

    Pictures of my room are at www.plan9studios.com/photos.html. I managed to build two rooms in a 750 sq. ft. basement, doing mostly all the labor myself for around $18k (construction only - bathroom & gear not included). The window wall between the rooms has an STC of over 65db and I've been recording drums at 1am while my wife and daughter are sound asleep. You can hear the drums upstairs, but it is below library levels and easy as hell to drown out with a fan or even a passing car.

    Good luck!

  5. #5
    Forum Frontman
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    07.04.16 @ 08:03 PM
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    Quote Originally Posted by HipCat5 View Post
    Having said that, The best results I've ever heard came from rooms that were built within rooms. That is, if you have a room [let's say in the basement], build another wall 2-3" away from each of the existing walls without physically connecting the new walls to the old ones.
    This is indeed the best means of soundproofing and is how most A-Room studios soundproof. When I finally buy a house and move my recording studio into it (which has occupied rented space since 1995), I will be building rooms within rooms and utilizing specialized insulation as per another thread above. HOWEVER, we're talking about a practice space here, not a recording studio, so I'd say do what is good for the house (and its value) and experiment with the insulation/sheetrock approach.

  6. #6
    Romeo Delight Strat God's Avatar
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    01.23.17 @ 01:54 PM
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    Depending on your budget - you can also hang large, thick cargo pads (for moving) 2 layers with nails to hold them against the walls. This is extremely effective in a pinch.
    Good luck.
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  7. #7
    Good Enough
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    06.19.15 @ 04:34 PM
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewThomas.net View Post
    HOWEVER, we're talking about a practice space here, not a recording studio, so I'd say do what is good for the house (and its value) and experiment with the insulation/sheetrock approach.
    Exactly. While I really appreciate everyone's help, the room-within-a- room option isn't practical....

    Anyway, we hung the drywall yesterday and tonight's our first practice. So I'll report back on my findings tomorrow...
    http://www.myspace.com/pennydreadfulnj

    “…and that’s when I learned that waterskiing and Quaaludes do not mix.”

    - Dewey Cox

  8. #8
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    Default Update

    So we had our fist post-soundproofing practice last night and….the room sounded fantastic! The sound was tight and we were actually able to turn down and hear ourselves and each other perfectly. I think part of the problem had been that with all of the noise bouncing off of the old wood paneling, we kept turning up to compensate; which probably made the situation worse. That’s not a problem anymore.

    As far as limiting the noise outside the house, it seemed to help a lot too. I had our drummer wail away for five minutes, while I went outside and walked around the house. It was considerably quieter than what I’m used to hearing. So, all in all, not bad results for about $200.
    http://www.myspace.com/pennydreadfulnj

    “…and that’s when I learned that waterskiing and Quaaludes do not mix.”

    - Dewey Cox

 

 

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