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  1. #1
    Atomic Punk
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    Online College Education

    Has anyone here used University of Phoenix, etc etc?
    "Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.” -- Gen. George S. Patton

  2. #2
    Good Enough
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    A friend of my wife's was doing it.

    As someone in a position to hire people, if i saw a resume with a degree from the Univerisity of Phoenix i would equate it to someone with no college experience at all.
    Dealing with it.

  3. #3
    Sinner's Swing! VH122's Avatar
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    I'm contemplating the situation.

  4. #4
    The Joker BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rchop84
    As someone in a position to hire people, if i saw a resume with a degree from the Univerisity of Phoenix i would equate it to someone with no college experience at all.
    I have a friend who got his Master degree through the University of Phoenix online. He is a very intelligent guy, and I think the education was solid.

    Why would you view an online education that way?

  5. #5
    The Joker BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VH122
    I'm contemplating the situation.
    My buddy thought it was a good experience. I think you get out of it what you make of it. I thought about it, but ultimately decided to go through a physical university just because I don't think I'd have the discipline to check the classroom online and all that...I need a physical structured environment.

    Edit Add: it is also too damn expensive!
    Last edited by BradS; 03.26.06 at 01:30 PM.

  6. #6
    Romeo Delight
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    From an MBA perspective atleast, the knock that online programs get is that you lack the interaction with your classmates and professors, thus limiting the different perspectives you would get, teaming skills, etc.

    I've been doing a lot of research on this over the past year, since I don't want to leave my job, have financial obligations (family, mortgage, etc). It seems like the best ways to go are part-time to an accredited school or to an executive MBA program.

    Not sure if any of you are looking at Phoenix online for MBAs, but if so, if you are looking to change jobs, it may not be the best way to go.

  7. #7
    The Joker BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOTW92
    From an MBA perspective atleast, the knock that online programs get is that you lack the interaction with your classmates and professors, thus limiting the different perspectives you would get, teaming skills, etc.
    My buddy let me see his "class", I think his was a MBA, anyway, you interact with your classmates and professor all the time...that's mostly what it is, and if you don't in addition to not doing all the work(and there is a lot) you fail.

    It seems like the best ways to go are part-time to an accredited school or to an executive MBA program.
    University of Phoenix is an accredited school, as well as several others.

    Not sure if any of you are looking at Phoenix online for MBAs, but if so, if you are looking to change jobs, it may not be the best way to go.
    I'd feel confident with it. My buddy got a job with Nike, and they didn't seem to have a problem with it...pretty nice job too. I think it's a good route if you're really disciplined, don't get distracted easily, and want to spend the money...tuition is a bitch for those online classes.

    Personally, if you can go to a physical university, then I would do that, but if not, I wouldn't sweat it...the education is top notch.

  8. #8
    Atomic Punk MikeL's Avatar
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    I have mixed feelings about online education. I've got a fair bit of experience with it, from both a student's perspective and an educator's perspective. Brad is right in saying that it takes quite a bit of dedication and discipline.

    I've worked with a couple of online high schools. It takes a special type of teacher to teach effectively in an online environment and a special type of student to thrive there. The students that do well rave about the amount of individual attention that they get compared to a traditional classroom. They feel it's the best educational experience they've ever had, and some of the work that they produce is amazing.

    For higher education, I think it's the future--particularly for working adults that already have families. If I were an employer, I'd look at an online education as being a strong positive. An online student absolutely has to be able to communicate effectively, have strong computer skills, and work without much supervision. A traditional education provides no demonstration of any of that. The amount of initiative required to get an online education while working and managing a family is far greater than that required by a traditional education.

    The downsides are that as a student you don't always have a feeling of community. You work with names and writing styles, but unless you really make an effort to get to know your classmates it doesn't happen. There's also a feeling of being in an independent study program, particularly if the instructor is lazy about updating their materials.

    I think the very best model is a hybrid, where most work is done online with a weekly or bi-weekly lecture period.

    It's rare for a higher education institution not to offer a selection of online courses. It's been a proven model for a decade, and it's effective. I wouldn't hesitate to enroll in an online program, but then again I know more about it than most people do.

  9. #9
    The Joker BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeL
    I have mixed feelings about online education. I've got a fair bit of experience with it, from both a student's perspective and an educator's perspective. Brad is right in saying that it takes quite a bit of dedication and discipline.

    I've worked with a couple of online high schools. It takes a special type of teacher to teach effectively in an online environment and a special type of student to thrive there. The students that do well rave about the amount of individual attention that they get compared to a traditional classroom. They feel it's the best educational experience they've ever had, and some of the work that they produce is amazing.

    For higher education, I think it's the future--particularly for working adults that already have families. If I were an employer, I'd look at an online education as being a strong positive. An online student absolutely has to be able to communicate effectively, have strong computer skills, and work without much supervision. A traditional education provides no demonstration of any of that. The amount of initiative required to get an online education while working and managing a family is far greater than that required by a traditional education.

    The downsides are that as a student you don't always have a feeling of community. You work with names and writing styles, but unless you really make an effort to get to know your classmates it doesn't happen. There's also a feeling of being in an independent study program, particularly if the instructor is lazy about updating their materials.

    I think the very best model is a hybrid, where most work is done online with a weekly or bi-weekly lecture period.

    It's rare for a higher education institution not to offer a selection of online courses. It's been a proven model for a decade, and it's effective. I wouldn't hesitate to enroll in an online program, but then again I know more about it than most people do.
    Damn, Mike. You almost sold me on it reading that post. I am going to start my Ph.D in August. I might seriously consider trying it online.

    If I do decide to do it, I'll definitely post how it's going. The only online college I remember offering a Ph.D in Criminal Justice was Capella University, and from what I read it is an outstanding school.

  10. #10
    Atomic Punk MikeL's Avatar
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    If you haven't taken online classes in the past, I would wade into them rather than jumping in. It really is a very different experience than traditional classroom lecture and can add up to considerably more work as well. With podcasting being so easy now, many profs record lectures to be listened to in conjunction with the notes that they provide. There's often an expectation that you'll participate in online discussions on each topic, which is much like what we do here.

    There are real advantages to online programs, too. You can largely set your own schedule, working when it is most convenient to you. There's no commute and where you are really doesn't matter much. It opens up programs that you could never participate in if you're unwilling to relocate.

    I did have one embarrassing moment while taking an online class. We had to form small teams, and the two gals I was working with decided that they didn't like the quality of each other's work. One of them kicked the other out of the group. Part of the class requirement was to tour the local Ford plant at a time of our own choosing, so I went one weekday afternoon. Unbeknownst to me, the gal standing behind me at the sign-in window was the one that had been kicked out of my group. She saw my name as she signed in, and that created one of those uncomfortable moments. What are the odds of that, eh? We ended up getting along really well and that made the plant tour a lot more fun.

    My law school classes all have a considerable online component. We've all got laptops, use them obsessively in class, and often have to take tests online. I record all of the lectures on my Mac, and my version of Word let's me append the recording to the notes I take. If I want to listen to any particular part of a lecture, all I have to do is click on the text that relates to it. It's all very slick and handy.

    The result of all this is that I can't wait to go camping in May. No computers, no electricity, no plumbing. Paradise!

  11. #11
    The Joker BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeL
    If you haven't taken online classes in the past, I would wade into them rather than jumping in. It really is a very different experience than traditional classroom lecture and can add up to considerably more work as well. With podcasting being so easy now, many profs record lectures to be listened to in conjunction with the notes that they provide. There's often an expectation that you'll participate in online discussions on each topic, which is much like what we do here.

    There are real advantages to online programs, too. You can largely set your own schedule, working when it is most convenient to you. There's no commute and where you are really doesn't matter much. It opens up programs that you could never participate in if you're unwilling to relocate.

    I did have one embarrassing moment while taking an online class. We had to form small teams, and the two gals I was working with decided that they didn't like the quality of each other's work. One of them kicked the other out of the group. Part of the class requirement was to tour the local Ford plant at a time of our own choosing, so I went one weekday afternoon. Unbeknownst to me, the gal standing behind me at the sign-in window was the one that had been kicked out of my group. She saw my name as she signed in, and that created one of those uncomfortable moments. What are the odds of that, eh? We ended up getting along really well and that made the plant tour a lot more fun.

    My law school classes all have a considerable online component. We've all got laptops, use them obsessively in class, and often have to take tests online. I record all of the lectures on my Mac, and my version of Word let's me append the recording to the notes I take. If I want to listen to any particular part of a lecture, all I have to do is click on the text that relates to it. It's all very slick and handy.

    The result of all this is that I can't wait to go camping in May. No computers, no electricity, no plumbing. Paradise!

    Thanks for the advice. I know Capella's Ph.D program is only one class at a time, so that will ease me in okay...if I decide to go that route.

    I have to teach one of my Intro classes on-line next semester. It's through a system called WebCT...it's very easy. Money is a lot better as well.

  12. #12
    Atomic Punk MikeL's Avatar
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    WebCT is nice. Blackboard is the other widely used online software. It's been a while since I've used WebCT. One tip is to avoid putting a date on your materials. Students get a little suspicious when the course materials have a date that's obviously well in the past.

 

 

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