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  1. #1
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    08.06.08 @ 04:31 AM
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    Default Resistive L-Pad attenuator

    Does anyone have any experience using a purely resistive L-Pad style speaker attenuation circuit and a Peavey 5150? I would like to build one using some rather large wattage power resistors to get roughly 10dB attenuation. Is the Peavey 5150 designed well enough to use such an L-pad circuit and not fry the output transformer in the process? I like the sound of the amp but I'd like to drive it a little harder without getting the volume.

    I know about the THD HotPlate type circuits, in case you're wondering ... I'm currently not in the mood to pay $300 for something as simple as an L-pad attenuator.

    Any feedback would be great.
    Thanks

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    08.06.08 @ 04:31 AM
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    Yeah, I've seen that thread. My question is more a question of how well the Peavey 5150 output transformers were engineered. If I were to build a simple L-Pad attenuator (2 resistors, each maybe 200w wirewound massive things) and gave it plenty of vent, could I drive the Peavey 5150 a little harder to get the tone out of the power tubes without melting the output transformer? Is it engineered well enough for that?

    Needless to say, the HOTPLATE is a nice design but its just so expensive for what it is. Oh well.

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    12.14.17 @ 12:39 PM
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    Hi,

    I have nowhere near your expertise regarding electronics, but I do use a 5150 with a Weber Mass. I use the line out of the Mass into a 1x12 solid state combo. I've never had any issues with the 5150. My pre and post gains are between 5 and 7. The amp doesn't need to be pushed past this really, and I found that it gets muddy when cranked to 10, but I have cranked it to 10 with the Weber for extended periods of time and had no problems at all. Hell, one night I even left the amp on, NOT on standby, and went to bed. I woke up out of a dead sleep at about 2 a.m. with the sickening realization that my amp was still on. I ran downstairs and shut it down-it fired up the next day just fine. Maybe I just got lucky, but the 5150 seems to be a rather rugged amp-but I don't really know about what kind of attenuator you plan to build-I do know the Mass works great with mine though.

  5. #5
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    08.06.08 @ 04:31 AM
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    vhin04: running the amp all night:

    Dude, don't sweat doing that. When EE's test their equipment, they do what is called "burn in" and usually its exactly what you did accidentally. They just set all controls to "10" and plug it into a resistive load and come back the next day. If something burned out, then they gotta re-engineer it. I actually do this with new gear I buy simply because if its still under warranty and it can't take a 24 hour "burn in" period, then it goes back to the shop from whence it came. =) The thing is, as long as there's no signal pushed into the amp, the amp isn't really doing That much work anyways, even on 10 on the dial. The work comes in when you hit a massive power chord with all controls dimed out ... older amps used to "sag" when you did that, almost giving a bit of a compression type effect.

    Sounds like the Peavey 5150 is engineered as good as most amps with some touring background behind the design, so I think I'm set. Wish me luck.

    Later!

 

 

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